Showing 37 results

Authority record
Faculty

Bloom, Samuel

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n2001004825
  • Person
  • 1921-2006

Hayes, Teresa

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n2014189446
  • Person
  • 1953-

Teresa Gray Hayes, MD, Ph.D. is an oncologist and an associate professor in hematology and oncology at Baylor College of Medicine. She earned both a Ph.D. and an MD from New York University School of Medicine, in 1981 and 1982, respectively

Marcus, Marianne

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n2017037881
  • Person

Marianne Marcus is the John P. McGovern Professor in Addiction Nursing and the assistant dean and department chair of Nursing Systems for the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Nursing. She donated her papers to the McGovern Historical Collections on May 14, 2013. One box totaling 1 cubic foot of various paper material.

Bruch, Hilde

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n50055887.html
  • Person
  • 1904-1984

Hilde Bruch was born in Dulken, Germany on March 11, 1904; her family was Jewish. An uncle encouraged her to study medicine and she graduated from Albert Ludwig University with a doctorate in 1929. She took academic and research positions with the University of Kiel and then the University of Leipzig, but left academia for private pediatric practice in 1932 because of rising anti-Semitism. She had already begun a career in pediatric physiology before she left Germany in 1933 after Hitler came into power. She then spent a year in England, where she worked at the East End Maternity Hospital, which served a Jewish community in an impoverished part of London. She moved to the United States in 1934 and worked at the Babies’ Hospital at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in New York City. She obtained her American medical license in 1935 and, in 1937, began research on childhood obesity, the beginning of her career studying eating disorders. She became an American citizen in 1940.
From 1941 to 1943 Bruch studied psychiatry at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore before returning to New York to open her own psychiatric practice and teach at Columbia University. She took a position in psychiatry at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston in 1964 and remained in Houston for the rest of her life. She died on December 15, 1984.

Merrill, Joseph

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n77015012
  • Person
  • 1923-

Joseph Melton Merrill was born December 8, 1923 in Andalusia, Alabama. He attended the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa for 15 months before qualifying for medical school. He enlisted in the infantry reserves in 1942 and because special consideration was given to medical students, was sent back to Tuscaloosa to start medical school in September 1944. He was in the Air Force in the early 1950s. As of February 2021, no obituary or other indication of his death have been found.

Busch, Harris

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n79039895
  • Person
  • 1923-2006

Harrison “Harris” Busch, MD, PhD, was born in Chicago on May 23, 1923. He served in the US Army during World War II and attended medical school at the University of Illinois, followed by an internship at Cook County Hospital. He also earned a Ph.D. in biochemistry from the University of Wisconsin in 1952. After teaching at Yale and (University of?) Illinois, he moved to Houston in 1960 to become a professor of pharmacology at Baylor College of Medicine. He stayed at Baylor until he retired in 1998. Busch was interested in the function of mRNA in producing proteins within cells. He died in Houston on September 22, 2006 and is buried at Adath Emeth Cemetery in Houston.

Schultz, Stanley G.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n79086970
  • Person
  • 1931-2014

Stanley Schultz was born in New York City in 1931. He earned his undergraduate degree from Columbia University in 1952 and then his MD from New York University College of Medicine. His postgraduate studies at Belleville Hospital and Harvard Medical School were interrupted by a stint in the Air Force medical corps. When his Harvard studies were completed, he spent nine years at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine before joining UT Health in 1979. He was known for is work on ion movement across membranes and his significant contributions to oral rehydration therapy. He died October 23, 2014.

Aday, Lu Ann

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n79107852
  • Person
  • 1946-

Lu Ann Aday was born in Waxahachie, Texas, on August 19, 1946. She earned her bachelor’s degree in agricultural economics in 1968 from Texas Tech University and then went to Purdue University for a Master’s in 1970 and then, in 1973, a doctorate in sociology. She was the associate director of the Center for Health Administration Studies at the University of Chicago before teaching at the University of Texas School of Public Health.

Dreizen, Samuel

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n81043291
  • Person
  • 1918-1994

Samuel Dreizen was born September 12, 1918 in New York, New York, and died April 26, 1994, in Houston, and is buried at Beth Yeshurun Cemetery in Houston. He taught at the University of Texas Dental Branch.

Levy, Barnet M.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n81050355
  • Person
  • 1917-2014

Barnet M. Levy was born in Pennsylvania in 1917. He received his AB and DDS degrees from the University of Pennsylvania and an MS degree from the Medical College of Virginia. He held positions at Medical College of Virginia, Washington University, Columbia University, National Institute of Dental Research, American Board of Pathology, Texas A&M, and many more. He came to Houston in 1957 and established the University of Texas Dental Science Institute.
[Citation: “D’Souza, R.N., P. O’Neill, H. Arzate, and P.B. Robertson. “A Tribute to the Life of Dr. Barnet M. Levy." Journal of Dental Research. SAGE Publications, July 2014. Web.PMID: 27455533. doi: 10.1177/0022034514537275]

Cole, Thomas R.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n85123512
  • Person
  • 1949-

Thomas R. Cole was born in 1949 in New Haven, Connecticut. He graduated with his bachelor’s in Philosophy from Yale University in 1971, and he would finish his Master’s in History in 1975 at Wesleyan University. Dr. Cole obtained his PhD. in History from the University of Rochester in 1981.

Dr. Cole has held many faculty positions at various universities throughout his career. The bulk of his work and research was and is conducted between 1982-2019 at the University of Texas Medical Branch. He has worked in several departments: the Institute for Medical Humanities, School of Public Health, Department of Family Medicine, Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, Institute for the Medical Humanities, and the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences. His research conducted here has been dedicated to the writing of several articles, books, and films on Aging and (Humanistic) Gerontology. Dr. Cole’s work is concerned with how society and the medical field view Aging and the ethical practice of medicine, especially within Geriatrics. He has published several books and articles on Aging that have been published in a variety of medical journals and international publications. Dr. Cole’s work also reflects the passion he has for autobiography and the telling of an individual’s ‘story.’ Cole has hosted several writing workshops and other programs to help people record their life’s memories. This passion has also led him to produce films such as The Strange Demise of Jim Crow and books such as No Color is My Kind: The Life of Eldrewey Stearns and the Desegregation of Houston. He has earned numerous awards and mentions for his extensive work.

As of 2020, Dr. Cole was the McGovern chair in the Medical Humanities Department as well as the Director of the McGovern Center for Humanities and Ethics at the University of Texas Health Science Center. He has served on several committees. Dr. Cole plans to publish Old Man Country: My Search for Meaning Among the Elders in the Fall of 2019; this book’s research materials are now found within his papers.

Kraft, Irvin A.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n85387373
  • Person
  • 1921-2010

Irvin Alan Kraft was born in Huntington, West Virginia, on November 20, 1921. He attended from Johns Hopkins University but interrupted his education to join the army. He qualified for the Army Specialized Training Program and volunteered to become a doctor, which meant completing two years of pre-medical courses in nine months. His unit studied at NYU School of Medicine and he completed his residency in psychiatry at Kingsbridge VA Hospital in New York City. After a second tour of duty in the Air Force, he received a fellowship in child psychiatry at Tulane University in 1954. He moved to Houston in 1957 to initiate a child psychiatry program at Baylor College of Medicine. He later joined the UT School of Public Health as a clinical professor of mental health.
Kraft was instrumental in founding the Texas Institute of Child Psychiatry in 1963. He worked with Denton Cooley in 1968 as a psychiatric consultant to the heart transplant team. He died May 30, 2010, and is buried at Emanu El Memorial Park.

Smythe, Cheves M.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n89664729
  • Person
  • 1924-2020

Cheves McCord Smythe was born in Charleston, South Carolina in 1924. He was born into a well-established South Carolina family. Smythe received his undergraduate degree from Yale College in 1943, and his medical degree in 1947 from Harvard Medical School. He completed his internship and residency at the Boston City Hospital. Next, he served as a Research Fellow at the Presbyterian Hospital in New York. Following this, he returned to the Boston City Hospital as a Chief Resident. From 1942-1966, Smythe served in the U.S. Naval Reserve. He was a part of the Medical Corps and became a Lieutenant Commander. He retired from the Naval Reserve in 1966. Beginning in 1955, Smythe started as an Instructor in Medicine at the Medical College of South Carolina. He eventually becoming an Assistant Professor of Medicine and finally Dean. He remained as Dean from 1963 until his departure in 1966. The following four years he served as Assistant Director and Director of the Department of Academic Affairs at the Association of American Medical Colleges. The bulk of his career was spent at The University of Texas Medical School at Houston, where he became the first dean of the school in 1970. He would remain as dean until 1975. Smythe continued his profession at the university until 1995, serving as Professor, Adjunct Professor, and Dean Pro Tem. Smythe continued his career abroad when he became the Dean at the Aga Khan University in Karachi, Pakistan. He served in this role from 1982 to 1985. His involvement with the school continued, and he returned as Professor and Chairman of the Department of Medicine from 1990 to 1991. Smythe had many hospital appointments including the Hermann Hospital, Memorial Southwest Hospital, and the LBJ Hospital. He was also a member of many medical organizations and received many honors and awards. In addition, he was the author of numerous publications. For a complete list of accomplishments please visit Smythe’s vitae and bibliography.

Dr. Smythe died May 11, 2020, in Charleston, South Carolina.

Boutwell, Bryant

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n99804345
  • Person

Dr. Bryant Boutwell was the Associate Vice President for Accreditation and International Programs at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. He held John P. McGovern, M.D. Professorship in Oslerian Medicine at the UT Medical School at Houston.

Hartgraves, Ruth

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2004021115
  • Person
  • 1991-1995

Ruth Hartgraves, MD, a Houston obstetrician and gynecologist who delivered more than 3,000 Houstonians and pioneered the trail for women in medicine during the span of her 50 year career, died October 17, 1995, at the age of 93. A native Texan, Dr. Hartgraves was born October 24, 1901 and moved to the Houston area during the 1930s to attend the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) in Galveston. She graduated from UTMB's School of Medicine in 1932, and thereafter completed an internship at the New England Hospital for Women and Children in Boston, and a residency at the New York Infirmary for Women and Children.

Dr. Hartgraves begain her career in Houston in 1935 and held appointments at Methodist, Hermann, Memorial, St. Luke's and Jefferson Davis Hospitals before retiring from practice in 1987. She was also a faculty member of Baylor College of Medicine for almost 30 years.

Dr. Hartgraves was the recipient of the 1992 Distinguished Professional Women's Award which is presented by the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. This award was presented in recognition of Dr. Hartgraves' outstanding achievements in Texas and the nation, for the significant contributions she made to her professional discipline, and for her pioneering spirit to mentor women and to provide a positive role model.

In 1985, she was awarded the Distinguished Alumnus Award from the University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Hartgraves was also the recipient of the 1980 Ashbel Smith Distinguished Alumnus Award granted by the UTMB School of Medicine alumni to graduates who have made significant contributions to the medical profession and to mankind.

She served as an organizer and the first President of the Houston branch of the American Medical Women's Association (AMWA), as well as President of the national AMWA organization. In 1975, her efforts earned her the AMWA's highest honor, the Elizabeth Blackwell Award, presented annually to a person making an outstanding contribution to the cause of women in medicine. Dr. Hartgraves was the first Texas physician to be so recognized.

She was a charter member of St. Luke's United Methodist Church and had a life-long record of involvement in community affairs, including the Houston Grand Opera, the Houston Ballet Society, and the Blue Bird Circle Clinic for Pediatric Neurology.

Houston Chronicle, Thursday, October 19, 1995.

Burdon, Kenneth Livingston

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2011184007
  • Person
  • 1895-1985

Kenneth Livingston Burdon, MD, was born in Providence, Rhode Island in 1895. He was educated at Brown University, receiving his Ph.D. in 1922. Dr. Burdon served with the U.S. Army Sanitary Medical Corps, (1918-1919), taught at Washington University School of Medicine (1922-1935) and then at Louisiana State University School of Medicine (1935-1943). Kenneth Burdon, MD is recognized as the Founding Chair of the Department of Microbiology Baylor University College of Medicine (1943-1961). He was awarded Professor Emeritus of Microbiology in 1961.

Dr. Burdon’s research and publications feature the following topics: “characterization of a group of aerobic spore-forming bacilli, especially Bacillus anthracis, and on immediate-type hypersensitivity. He also worked on development of an antibiotic to treat tuberculosis. He was a director of an NIH-supported Fellowship Training Program in Allergy and Immunology in conjunction with the Department of Pediatrics from 1958 to 1967. Dr. Burdon authored six editions of a widely used textbook Microbiology, first published in 1939. He also authored a Medical Microbiology textbook.”

Dr. Burdon retired in 1967 and passed away in 1985. Further information and a bibliography of Dr. Burdon’s papers are available in the first folder of this collection.

Citation:"Kenneth L. Burdon, Founding Chair, Microbiology." Baylor College of Medicine. Accessed February 21, 2016. https://www.bcm.edu/departments/molecular-virology-and-microbiology/about-us/history-of-the-department/kenneth-l-burdon.

Fred, Herbert L.

  • https://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n88090673.html
  • Person
  • 1929-2018

Herbert Leonard Fred, MD was born June 11, 1929 in Waco, Texas. He was known for his contribution to medical education. He was an award-winning clinician, diagnostician, and professor of internal medicine. Dr. Fred, an emeritus American Osler Society member, centered his medical practice on the patient, championing the use of the mind and five senses to develop medical diagnoses.

In Waco, the Fred family was known for community service, keen athletic team support, and their jewelry store, L. Fred and Son. His father, Isadore (Isie) Fred (1897-1969) received a posthumous City of Waco Commemoration for contributions to the community. Famous for his zest for life and his warm heart, Isie was a friend of many community and national leaders in athletics and film. Dr. Fred’s mother was Helen Louise Marks (1905-1985). He had one sister, Shirley Fred Strauss (1932-2014). Dr. Fred’s paternal grandparents were Louis Fred (died 1940), a Prussian immigrant who became a naturalized citizen of the United States in 1908, and Pauline (Peshi) Fred (1866-1950). Dr. Fred’s maternal grandparents were Samuel Marks (1866-1932) and Fannie Marks (1869-1956). Dr. Fred married Lucille (Lucy) Therese Maule (born 1928) in 1954. They had three children: Stuart Fred (born 1955) and twins Nancy Lynn Fred Sadick and Michael Fred (born 1957). Dr. Fred and Lucy divorced in 1976. Dr. Fred married Judith Ann Edgar Biddington in 1978. She had four children from her first marriage: Lisa Collette Biddington (born 1961), Floyd Wesley Biddington (born 1965), Gregory Leonard Biddington (born 1969), and Stefani Biddington, (birth date unknown).

Dr. Fred spent his boyhood in Waco, Texas, graduating from Waco High School in 1946. He attended then Rice Institute (today Rice University) in Houston, TX, graduating in 1950. He attended medical school at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland from 1950 to 1954. He completed his medical training as an internist with a two year internship and residency at The University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah in 1957. Dr. Fred served as a Captain in the United States Air Force Medical Corps from 1957-1959, acting as Chief of Medicine at the Amarillo Air Force Base Hospital in Amarillo, Texas. He then returned to Salt Lake City first as Chief Resident, Department of Internal Medicine, at the Salt Lake City General Hospital and then as an Instructor in Medicine at the University of Utah College of Medicine from 1959 to 1961. In 1962, Dr. Fred and his young family moved to Houston, Texas where Dr. Fred accepted an appointment as Instructor in Medicine at Baylor University College of Medicine.

Dr. Fred worked at institutions in Houston, Texas for the remainder of his career. After holding a number of academic positions at Baylor from 1962 to 1969, Dr. Fred left Baylor to accept a position as Director of Medical Education at St. Joseph Hospital in 1969 where he continued until 1988. In addition, he accepted positions as Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine at the University Of Texas Graduate School Of Biomedical Sciences in 1968 and as Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, at The University of Texas Health Science Center in 1971, retaining both appointments today. From 1979 to 2002, Dr. Fred served as Adjunct Professor, Human Performance and Health Sciences, at his alma mater, Rice University. From 1988 to 1993, Dr. Fred held a position as the Educational Coordinator at the HCA Center for Health Excellence. Beginning in 1982, Dr. Fred served as a medical expert witness in a number of medical malpractice trials. Records pertaining to these trials from 1988 to 2011 are located in the Legal Series. These folders are restricted due to the use of patient names until 2050. Dr. Fred is a member of thirteen medical societies including the American Medical Joggers Association, American College of Physicians, American College of Chest Physicians, American College of Sports Medicine, American Medical Writers Association, and American Osler Society.

Dr. Fred received numerous awards for teaching excellence from students and peers. Highlights include: Outstanding Full-Time Clinical Faculty Member at Baylor University College of Medicine in 1964 and 1967; a citation from President Ronald Reagan in October 4, 1988 for 27 years as a medical educator; The Benjy F. Brooks, M.D. Outstanding Clinical Faculty Award from the Alumni Association of the University of Texas Medical School in Houston in 1999; honoree of The Herb Fred Medical Society, Inc., a corporation established in 2002 by former students; The American College of Physicians – American Society of Internal Medicine Distinguished Teacher Award along with election to Mastership in The American College of Physicians in 2004; the TIAA-CREF Distinguished Medical Educator Award in 2005; and The American College of Physicians Laureate Award in 2012.

Dr. Fred’s running and medical practices intersected. Some of his scholarly articles include clinical descriptions of long distance running effects on the human body and promote running as preventive medicine. He often combined participation in running events with visiting professorships and Grand Rounds at other medical institutions. Dr. Fred began his competitive running career by running marathons but later switched to ultra-marathons, 100 mile races lasting 24-26 hours. Dr. Fred holds 3 National Age Records. By 2011, Dr. Fred had run a total of 244,950 miles.

Dr. Fred’s writing career arose from his medical practice and running competition. A tenacious advocate of clarity and precision in medical discourse both in his teaching and as an author, Dr. Fred determined to improve the accuracy of medical communication, written and spoken. Dr. Fred wrote over 450 scholarly medical articles. He served as editor-in-chief of the Houston Medical Journal from 1984 to 1988 and Houston Medicine from 1988 to1993. Other editorial responsibilities included positions with Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise from 1979 to 1986, Annals of Sports Medicine from 1982 to 1985, Circulation from 1995 to 2004, Resident and Staff Physician from 2003 to 2008, and Texas Heart Institute Journal from 2011to the present. Dr. Fred served as a peer reviewer for Southern Medical Journal, Chest, Journal of the American Medical Association, and Circulation. He was a correspondent for Ultrarunning magazine from 1981 to 1986. Dr. Fred authored several books in his career, including "Elephant Medicine and More", "Say Aah, Medical Writing: A Practical Guide", "Looking Back (and Forth): Reflections Of An Old-Fashioned Doctor", "Images of Memorable Cases: 50 Years At The Bedside", and "The Best of Herb Fred, MD".

Dr. Fred served on the Board of Trustees for the Houston Congregation for Reform Judaism from 1995 to 2004, acting as President of the Board from 1996 to 1998. Additionally, he joined the Board of Directors for the Friends of the Texas Medical Center Library in 2007, acting as Secretary from January 2011 to the present.

Dr. Fred continued to practice medicine and ran 11 miles a day on his treadmill until 2016. He retired in 2016. Dr. Fred died on December 30, 2018 and is buried in Agudath Jacob Cemetery in Waco.

Johnson, Herman Walter

  • https://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2018075774.html
  • Person
  • 1883-1958

Herman Walter Johnson, MD (1883-1958) was born in Andover, Vermont on August 2, 1883. He graduated from the University of Buffalo Medical School in 1905 and, after years of working as a male midwife in New York and Texas, was appointed Professor and Chairman of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Baylor College of Medicine. He served in World War I as a major in the United States Army Medical Corps. He held memberships and fellowships at the State Board of Medical Examiners for the State of Texas, the Academy International of Medicine, the Texas Association of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and the Houston Surgical Society. He published his autobiography, titled Reminiscences of a Male Midwife, in 1954. Herman Walter Johnson, MD died on November 14, 1958. This information was taken from the Texas Medical History E-book 4 available through the Texas Medical History Documents link on the DigitalCommons@The Texas Medical Center web page and materials within the Johnson collection.

Doak, Edmund K.

  • Person
  • 1909-2000

Edmond King Doak, (Jr.?) was born October 3, 1909, in Taylor, Texas, and died 29 November 2000 in Houston. His father was Edmond King Doak, Sr., MD, born August 9, 1878, in Lexington, Texas, and died December 20, 1971 in Taylor, Texas. Doak, Sr., was among the doctors who built a new hospital in Taylor in 1920.
Doak, Jr., graduated from the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1934 and was on the faculty at Baylor College of Medicine. He had an office in the Hermann Professional Building in 1974. Member of the American Diabetes Association; was on the Council 1959-1960.
He has (two?) entries in the Gazetteer of Texas Physicians and his papers are MS 049 at the Texas Medical Center archives. His portrait is N-1003.

Seybold, William Dempsey

  • Person
  • 1915-2004

Dr. William Dempsey Seybold was born in Temple, Texas on February 23, 1915, the oldest son of Claude Dempsey and Lillian Cochrane Seybold. He attended high school in Temple and received his B.S. in medicine from the University of Texas at Austin in 1936.
In 1938, he received his M.D. from the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston and stayed on as an instructor of anatomy until 1940. While an instructor, Dr. Seybold made a discovery that had previously gone unnoticed in the study of gross anatomy. He noted small ligaments that hold the spinal cord in place and published his first paper on the subject in 1940 in Anatomical Record entitled, "A note on the occurrence of transverse fibrous bands in the spinal dural sac of man." Dr. Seybold left his teaching appointment at the UT Medical Branch to do his internship at Barnes Hospital in St. Louis, Missouri, which he completed in 1941.
On May 3, 1941, Dr. Seybold married Frances Randolph Rather of Austin, and together they moved to Rochester, Minnesota, where he began his residency in surgery at the Mayo Clinic. Their first son, William Rather Seybold was born in Rochester in April, 1942. Between 1944 and 1946 he served as Lt. JG. with the United States Naval Reserve Medical Corps. During that time their second son, Randolph Cochrane Seybold, was born in December, 1944. The Seybold family returned to Rochester where Dr. Seybold completed his training in both general and thoracic surgery in 1947. He was appointed to the Mayo Clinic staff in 1948.
While at the Mayo Clinic, Dr. Seybold dedicated much of his time to the surgical treatment of tuberculosis and became a close friend and colleague of Dr. O. T. "Jim" Clagett, with whom he published several articles, including "Resection in pulmonary tuberculosis" and "The use of gelatin foam in thoracopiasties." Dr. Seybold also served as a visiting thoracic surgeon at the Nopeming Sanatorium near Duluth, Minnesota, a sanatorium regularly staffed with Mayo physicians.
The Seybold's third child, a daughter, Frances Rather Seybold, was born in Rochester in October, 1949.
Dr. Seybold resigned from the Mayo Clinic on October 1, 1950, to return to his native Texas, where he joined the practice of another Mayo alumnus, Dr. Mavis P. Kelsey. A third Mayo-trained physician, Dr. William V. Leary, also became a partner. Two years later, however, Dr. Seybold withdrew from the partnership and established himself in an office in the Hermann Professional Building. In the summer of 1954, Dr. John W. Overstreet joined Dr. Seybold, forming a partnership that lasted until 1961, when Dr. Seybold rejoined what was then called the Kelsey-Leary Clinic. Dr. Seybold remained a partner in the subsequent Kelsey-Seybold Clinic, became Chief of the Surgery Section and later Chief of Staff, Chairman of the Professional Committee, and member of the Executive Committee.
Dr. Seybold also was the Chief of Surgery of St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital (a position he held from 1956), and Chief of Staff of St. Luke's from 1967-1970. He was on the active staff of both Methodist and Hermann Hospitals as well.
The teaching appointments he held were as Clinical Professor of Surgery with Baylor College of Medicine; Clinical Associate in the Program of Surgery, University of Texas Medical School in Houston; and Consultant in Surgery, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute, among others.
In addition to his administrative and teaching responsibilities, Dr. Seybold was an active member in many professional associations and organizations, including: Alpha Omega Alpha, AMA, Fellowship in the American College of Surgeons (member of the Board of Governors), Fellowship in the American College of Chest Physicians, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, Mayo Alumni Association (liaison for Mayo with Baylor College of Medicine and Ad Hoc Committee member), Western Surgical Society (member of programs committee), Texas Medical Association (Chairman of the Section on Surgery, Chairman of the Nursing and Patient Services Committees), Texas Surgical Society (president in 1971), Harris County Medical Society, Houston Surgical Society and Sigma XI. He was a member of the Advisory Board and the Credentials Committee of the American Association of Medical Clinics, member of the Board of Trustees of the Kelsey-teary Foundation, member of the Chancellor's Council of the University of Texas System and member of the Advisory Board to the President of the University of Texas Medical Branch. He received a citation of merit from the UT Medical Branch in 1970.
Dr. Seybold participated in several civic organizations, devoting much of his time to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Houston Area Chapter where he held positions as chairman of the chapter, secretary, board member, and on numerous committees. He served as Vice President of the Southwestern Region and on several committees at the national level as well. He had worked diligently for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society since 1959 and received a citation of merit from the Society in 1969.
He served as President and Board member of the Texas Division of the American Cancer Society, and was on the Board of Directors and Executive Committee of the Harris County Unit for many years. He received a citation of merit from the American Cancer Society in 1961. Dr. Seybold was also an active member of the Friends of the Texas Medical Center Library, Friends of the Houston Public Library and the Texas State Historical Association, and served as a member of the Vestry of St. John the Divine Episcopal Church in Houston.
To his credentials are added the publication of 52 medical papers, innumerable presentations and lectures, and 5 books on which he collaborated.
Dr. and Mrs. Seybold's daughter died of bacterial endocarditis in November, 1968 at the age of 19. His wife, Frances, died in January, 1977 after living with multiple sclerosis for many years. Their two sons both became physicians. Dr. Seybold died July 8, 2004, and willed his body to the University of Texas Southwest Medical Center in Dallas.

Rodgers, L. Rodney

  • Person
  • 1920-2012

Lawrence Rodney Rogers, MD, was born March 9, 1920 in Clovis, New Mexico, to a cowboy and a schoolteacher, and died December 13, 2012, in Houston. He grew up in Amarillo, Texas. He was elected to the Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor Society during his junior year at the University of Texas Medical Branch. He volunteered for the US Army during World War II and served as a battalion surgeon in the 42nd Rainbow Division in the European Theater, including the Battle of the Bulge, for which he earned three Bronze Stars and four Battle Stars. Accounts of his treatment of prisoners at Dachau and Jewish patients in occupied Austria are on video at the Houston Holocaust Museum.
Dr. Rodgers specialized in internal medicine at Philadelphia General Hospital for three years before returning to Texas to practice in Houston from 1949 to 1994. He was chair of the Department of Internal Medicine at Hermann Hospital in 1965 and was active in the effort to establish the University of Texas Medical School at Hermann in 1966-1967 and served the school both as a professor and member of many committees.
Dr. Rodgers served the Harris County Medical Society as TMA delegate, on the executive board, and for a year as vice president, and was for a time editor of the Harris County Physician. He served as President of the Houston Society of Internal Medicine in 1974, of the Houston Academy of Medicine in 1981, of the Doctors’ Club in 1986, and the Houston Philosophical Society in 1994, and supported and participated in many more organizations. He was awarded the Ashbel Smith Distinguished Alumni Award by UTMB, and the American College of Physicians awarded him both a Laureate Internist Award for Texas and Mastership of the College.

Schnur, Sidney

  • Person
  • 1910-1997

Sidney A. Schnur (June 23, 1910 – April 8, 1997) was born in Manhattan, New York and earned his MD from New York University in 1935. He was a physician and a clinical assistant professor at Baylor College of Medicine. One of Schnur’s patients at St. Joseph’s Hospital, near death from cardiogenic shock (when the heart cannot pump enough blood to meet the body’s needs) after a heart attack, was the test for Denton Cooley’s heart-lung machine in April 1956; the patient lived another six weeks before succumbing to a second heart attack.
Schnur served as president of the Harris County Medical Society in 1972.

Burbank, Reginald

  • Person
  • 1888-1972

Reginald Burbank, MD, was born in Pittsfield, Massachusetts on July 26, 1888. Dr. Burbank obtained his medical degree from Cornell Medical College in 1915. Some of the many professional positions he held included: Assistant surgeon New York Orthopedic Hospital (1916-1926); Chief of the Arthritis Clinic at Cornell Medical College (1917-1919); Instructor in Arthritis, chief, arthritis clinic Bellevue Medical College (1916-1926); Consultant on arthritis, Brooklyn Hospital (1926-1956); and Director, arthritis clinic St. Claire’s Hospital 1940-1956). Dr. Burbank dedicated more than fifty years of his life to the study, research, and treatment of arthritis, rheumatism, and gout. Dr. H.J. Hadjopoulos conducted research alongside Dr. Burbank for forty-seven years, and Dr. Hadjopoulos’ name is attached to most of the medical research drafted and published in the manuscripts found within these papers. Dr. Burbank died December 20, 1972, in St. Petersburg, Florida.

Ivan F. Duff, MD

  • Person
  • 1915-1994

Dr. Ivan Frances Duff was born July 20, 1915 in Pendleton, Oregon. He died in October 1994. He graduated from the University of Oregon and the University of Michigan Medical School, where he completed his internship and residency training in internal medicine. In 1946 he joined the faculty of the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Michigan, as an instructor, becoming a Professor in 1960. Dr. Duff founded the Turner Geriatric Clinic at the University of Michigan Medical Center. His major interest was in the field of rheumatic diseases.

Dr. Duff was a member of U.S. Naval Reserve and served on active duty as a commander in the Submarine Medical Service in the Pacific theater from 1942 to 1946. After the war, he returned to the University of Michigan where he joined the faculty of the Department of Internal Medicine.

Dr. Duff's interest in epidemiology led to studies with the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) beginning in 1964. He was a researcher with the ABCC from 1967-1975 and then with the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) from 1975-1986. He studied the incidence and prevelance of rheumatoid arthritis and gout in Hiroshima and Nagasaki patients.

In 1980, Dr. Duff was a member of an American Physician Exchange Group of twelve doctors visiting the People's Republic of China at the invitation of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences. This initial visit led to a long relationship between Dr. Duff and the Chinese medical community. From 1981 to 1991, Dr. Duff was a research consultant at Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences Beijing, People's Republic of China, where he collaborated in epidemiologic studies of rheumatic diseases.

Dr. Duff was a leader in the field of rheumatology. He was the recipient of many awards and honors and served on many national panels.

Dr. Duff died at his home in Ann Arbor, Michigan on Oct. 27, 1994 at the age of 79.

Levy, Moise Dreyfus

  • Person
  • 1889-1963

Moise Dreyfus Levy Sr, MD was born September 4, 1889 in Galveston, Texas and grew up in Natchitoches, Louisiana "where he attended school and later the Louisiana State Normal College" (Texas State Journal of Medicine volume 59 pages 248-49, March 1963). Levy graduated from the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston in 1913. He was awarded an internship at St. Louis City Hospital, St. Louis, Missouri (Texas State Journal of Medicine, volume 9).

Dr. Levy served two years in the United States Medical Corps during World War I. Afterwards, he returned to Texas where he became an assistant professor of medicine at his alma mater, the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston from 1915 until 1922. Levy served as a clinical professor at Baylor College of Medicine from 1943 to 1954 and was a professor emeritus from 1954 until his death in 1963 (TSJM 59:248-49, Mar., 1963).

Dr. Levy was the first president of the Texas Society of Pathology, which was founded in 1921 and continues to exist today. He was a founding member of the American Board of Internal Medicine and a fellow of the American College of Physicians. In 1957, Dr. Levy was elected president of the Harris County Medical Society. He was an active member of the medical community and was a member of many organizations including The American Heart Association, Houston Society of Internal Medicine, World Medical Association, American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygene.

Dr. Levy married Sarah Weill in 1917. They had four children: Moise D. Levy Jr. b.1918, Justine, Sara Jo and Melanie b. 1925. Dr. Levy's son Moise D. Levy, Jr. followed his father into medicine and became a successful rheumatologist.

Dr. Levy was active in Jewish affairs, he was twice elected president of the Houston Congregation for reformed Judiasm. He was active in the Rotary Club and in the Planned Parenthood Center of Houston. (TSJM 59:248-49, Mar., 1963).

Dr. Levy was the author of 33 published medical writings. Several of Dr. Levy's articles focused on the Houston / Galveston / Beaumont area, including a 1920 article on an epidemic of Dengue fever that had recently affected Galveston, TX and the surrounding area.

Dr. Moise Dreyfus Levy Sr. died at his home in Houston, TX on Jan. 30, 1963 at the age of 73.

Dmochowski, Leon

  • Person
  • 1909-1981

Leon Dmochowski was a virologist, experimental oncologist, and academic born on July 1, 1909 in Ternopil (Ukraine; at that time Austrian crown land of Galicia). He died on August 26, 1981 in Mexico City and was buried in Houston, Texas.

Dmochowski attended the Ukrainian Grammar School for Boys in Peremyshl, and in 1928-33 he studied at the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Lviv, where he gained a bachelor's degree. In 1934-35 he worked as a general practitioner at the Lviv university clinic. He subsequently obtained a grant from the J. Potocki Foundation for Scientific Investigation of Cancer and Tuberculosis and moved to Warsaw where, from 1935 to 1938, he was a research assistant in the cancer laboratoryy of the Polish State Institute of Hygiene, Department of Bacteriology and experimental Medicine. In 1973 he gained a Doctor of Medicine degree from Warsaw University.

Obtaining a one-year traveling fellowship from the Potocki Foundation, in 1938 he came to the United Kingdom where, unti l1946, he conducted research at the Imperial Cancer Research Fund (now Cancer Research UK). During this period he published five papers in the British Medical Journal, the British Journal of Experimental Pathology, the British Journal of Cancer and the Journal of Pathology and Bacteriology. in 1946 he moved to Leeds, where he worked as a researcher and lecturer in the Department of Experimental Pathology and Cancer Reasearch at the School of Medicine, University of Leeds. He also lectured in microbiology. In 1949 he obtained a second doctorate from Leeds University, and in 1950 was promoted to the position of reader at the university. In this period he published a further 24 papers in The Lancet (1947), Nature (1947, 1948, 1950, 1951) and other journals (Advances in Cancer Research, British Medical journal, Journal of the National Cancer Institute, Acta-Unio Internationalis Contra Cancrum, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences). In 1951, he was invited to give a series of lectures on oncology at a number of universities in the USA. in 1953-54 he was a visiting associate professor of microbiology at the Colombia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York. From 1949 to 1955 he was an adviser to the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration (UNRRA). He was a member of the Royal Society of Medicine, the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, the British Society of General Microbiology, and the Pathological Society oof Great Britain and Ireland.

Deciding to settle in the USA, in 1954 Dmochowski moved from New York to Houston, where in 1954-55 he was a professor of anatomy at the Baylor University of College of Medicine, and a consultant at the M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute (now University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center). He continued to work at M.D. Anderson where he was chief of the Section of Virology and Electron Microscopy (1955-65), acting head of the newly-established Department of Virology (1965-66), and, from 1966, professor and head of the Department of Virology. From 1955 he was also professor ofexperimental pathology at the University of Texas Postgraduate School of Medicine, and, from 1965, professor of virology at the new University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences. Additionally, he was a clinical professor at the Baylor University College of Medicine (from 1955), and a distinguished lecturer at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta (1966). After 1974 he continued with his academic and research work at M.D. Anderson. His main academic interests included virology, experimental oncology, immunology and serology of tumors, endocrinology, and electron microscopy in cancer diagnosis. He was the author or co-author of over 450 articles and papers, as well as chapters in several books. He was at the forefront of research into the role of viruses in oncology, one of the first researchers to report the viral origins of various malignant tumors (1953), and a pioneer in the application of electron microscopy in oncovirology. He also discovered viruses which cause leucosis in rodents and demonstrated the presence of such viruses in human beings.

Dmochowski was a member of the Ukrainian Physicians' Society in Lviv and the Ukrainian Medical Association of North America, and (from 1959) a full member of the Shevchenko Scientific Society in the US. He was also a member of the American Association for Cancer Research, the Electron Microscopy Society of America, the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine, the American Society for Microbiology, the New York Academy of Sciences, the Leukemia Society of America (National Board of Trustees, 1966-; National Medical and Scientific Advisory Board, 1966-1970), and the Pan American Cancer Cytology Society. He was an honorary member of the Chilean Society of Cancerology.

Source: Kovaliv, Yuriy B. (20 June 2014). Leon Dmochowski. Ukrainians in the United Kingdom. Retrieved from http://www.ukrainiansintheuk.info/eng/02/dmochowski-e.htm

Creson, Daniel Lenard

  • Person
  • 1935-2015

Born in 1935, Dr. Daniel L. Creson was in in private practice with North Texas Psychiatry and Psychotherapy in Denton, Texas. He was Professor Emeritus at The University of Texas Health Science Center - Houston in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. He served there as Clinical Professor and Director of Continuing Education before his retirement in 2003. He was Board Certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology in 1971.

Dr. Creson received his medical degree from The University of Texas Medical Branch-Galveston, Texas in 1962. He earned an MA in Behavioral Science and a PhD in Anthropology from Rice University, Houston Texas. He holds academic appointments at Galveston Family Institute, The University of Texas Medical Branch - Galveston and The University of Texas Health Science Center - Houston. Among his past positions, he served as Adjunct Associate Professor at Tulane University, Executive Director of Gulf Coast Regional Mental Health-Mental Retardation Center, and Medical Director of Mental Health Mental Retardation Authority of Harris County.

Dr. Creson was active on several boards of mental health mental retardation organizations in Galveston and Houston as well as several committees for the Texas Society of Psychiatric Physicians. He has been a member of the Crisis Response Consortium of Harris County and Burn Disaster Response Team for Shriners Burn Institute. In addition to his past work in crisis situations throughout the world, he continues to serve as consultant to Humanitarian Aid and Medical Development (HMD) and Christian Children's Fund. Dr. Creson was instrumental in the development of an historical archives project, which seeks to document the history of mental health services in Texas. He personally obtained oral histories from many psychiatrists and other professionals throughout Texas.

Dr. Creson died November 30, 2015, in Sanger, Texas.

Dippel, A. Louis

  • Person
  • 1901-1991

Adelbert Louis Dippel was born in Ehlinger (now Ellinger), Texas, on July 10, 1901. He earned both a B.S. and an M.S. from the University of Texas in 1924, then an MD from UTMB in 1928. Dr. Dippel was an instructor and associate professor in obstetrics at Johns Hopkins University from 1934-1940, then at the University of Minnesota from 1940 to 1943; he was head of that department in 1943 and 1944. He then returned to Texas to take positions at Baylor College of Medicine and UTMB, where he remained until he retired in 1977. He died in Tacoma, Washington, on September 6, 1991.

Jensen, Francine

  • Person
  • 1917-2004

Francine Jensen was born August 1, 1917, in Memphis, Tennessee. She earned a BA from the University of Texas, an MD from UTMB, and a Master’s of Public Health from Tulane University, and did both an internship and residency at Jefferson Davis Hospital. In the 1940s she became the assistant director of Harris County’s Chronic Illness Prevention Program, which was intended to help people manage ailments such as diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. She was the director of the Houston Public Health Department’s CICP for six years and ultimately became the HPHD’s first female director. She retired in 1985. She held faculty appointments with Baylor College of Medicine and the University of Texas School of Public Health. She died November 8, 2004, in Houston

Wolf, Edward Trowbridge

  • Person
  • 1900-1987

Edward Trowbridge Wolf, MD was born May 2, 1900 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He received his Bachelor of Science in Pre—Med from Pennsylvania State College and in 1948 was honored with a 25 year Service Award from the Phi Delta Epsilon Medical Fraternity there. He was a June 1933 graduate of Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia, PA. Dr. Wolf served his internship at the Frankford Hospital in Philadelphia from 1933 to 1934 and at the William Beaumont General Hospital while in the US Army. Upon coming to Houston, he established his 46-year Internal Medicine practice at 4411 Fannin.

During WWII, Dr. Wolf was called up for active duty by the US. Army during which time he served at the rank of Major (MAJ), beginning January 1941, until his promotion to Lieutenant Colonel (LTC) in February 1943. In addition to stateside assignments, he was a veteran of two years of service with the medical corps in Australia and in the jungles of New Guinea. Following his service in Australia, he returned to inactive military status separating from the service in August 1945 to resume his Houston practice. LTC Wolf received an Honorable Discharge from the Army in May of 1951.

Dr. Wolf was appointed to the Baylor University College of Medicine Clinical Faculty as Assistant/Associate Professor of Medicine in Sept. 1943 and continuously held the position through June 1975. While a member of the medical staff at the Methodist Hospital in Houston, Dr. Wolf served as the Chairman of the Metabolic, Endocrine, Joint Disease Medical Care Appraisal Committee and Chairman of the Publications Committee. He was the first editor of News Notes published for the Methodist Hospital medical staff, a post he held for 5 years. Dr. Wolf was chairman of the first Blood Bank Committee of the Harris County Medical Society, and is perhaps most widely known as editor, for 10 years, of the Medical Record and Annals.

As a 45-year member of the Harris County Medical Society he served on the Press Committee. Dr. Wolf was Historian of Houston Society of Internal Medicine and in 1951, President of the Postgraduate Medical Assembly of South Texas. He was a member of the Texas Medical Association for 50 years, serving in 1968, as Chairman of the Technical Exhibits Sub-Committee. An Associate of the American College of Physicians, Dr. Wolf also held memberships in the American Medical Association, American Society of Internal Medicine and the NIH Alumni Association. He served as Consulting Internist for the Texas State Highway Patrol, the Southern Pacific Railroad (1961-1965), and was Consulting Internist and a member of the Board of both Planned Parenthood and the Visiting Nurses Association.

In addition to his professional service, Dr. Wolf contributed to many local organizations including the Deptartment of Medicine Library Fund of the Baylor College of Medicine, the Dept. of Medicine Library Fund of the Methodist Hospital, the Ellard Yow Memorial Library at Methodist Hospital, and The Foundation for the Museum of Medical Science. Edward Trowbridge Wolf, MD passed away July 15 1987.

O'Heeron, Michael K.

  • Person
  • 1908-1980

Michael K. O’Heeron, MD (1908-1980) was a clinical professor of urology at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, TX. He also worked in the urology department at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Houston, TX.

Stork, Walter J.

  • Person
  • 1900-1994

Walter Jacob Stork, MD, was born in Round Top, Texas in October 27, 1900. He was educated at University of Texas, receiving his M.D. in 1931. Dr. Stork served with the U.S. Army Medical Corps, (1943-1946), served as a physician and taught at Baylor University College of Medicine Department of Radiology (1973-1976). Dr. Stork’s research and publications feature the following topics: “Radiology and on Tuberculosis treatment and prevention and control. He also worked on development of an antibiotic to treat tuberculosis. Further information and a bibliography of Dr. Stork’s papers are available in the first folder of this collection.

Dr. Stork died on September 8, 1994, in Houston.

Greer, Alvis

  • Person
  • 1885-1975

Alvis Eugene Greer was born May 6, 1885, in Gallatin, Illinois. He earned his MD from Northwestern University in 1908 and received an Alpha Omega Alpha key at graduation. He spent two years at Harvard Postgraduate Medical School and served in the Army Medical Corps in World War I. Geer specialized in internal medicine and diseases of the chest. Taught at Baylor College of Medicine and was on staff at the Houston Tuberculosis Hospital, Memorial Hospital, and Jefferson Davis Hospital. He was a member of the American College of Chest Physicians, serving on its board of examiners from 1946 to 1952 and president from 1953 to 1954. He died in Houston on August 8, 1975, and is buried at Forest Park Cemetery.

Cooper, Alan B.

  • Person
  • 1928-2002

Alan Bruce Cooper was born in New York, New York on August 19, 1928. He earned a BS in 1949 and a Master’s in immunogenetics in 1951 from Wesleyan University, followed by an MD in 1955 from New York Medical School. After serving as chief of pathology at Harvard University, he joined the Air Force. After his discharge as a major, he taught at Baylor College of Medicine and New Orleans Psychoanalytic Institute in psychiatry and psychoanalysis. He was also in private practice in Houston between 1968 and 1985. In 1986, Dr. Cooper was appointed medical director of the University of Texas Adult Ambulatory Psychiatric Services and was later a professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. He died in Houston on December 29, 2002, of lung cancer.

Halpert, Bela

  • Person
  • 1896-1984

Bela Halpert was born in Hungary in 1896. He received his medical degree from the German University in Prague. He held positions as pathologist, instructor, professor, and fellow at German University, Johns Hopkins Medical School, University of Chicago, William Harvey Cushing Memorial Hospital, Yale University as well as various institutions in New Orleans and Oklahoma. He came to Houston in 1949 where he served as chief of laboratory services for the Veterans Administration and professor of pathology at Baylor College of Medicine.

Citation: Baker, Marilyn M. The History of Pathology in Texas. Texas Society of Pathologists, 1996. pp. 169-170.

University of Texas Faculty Wives

  • Corporate body
  • 1973-

The Faculty Wives was established in 1973-1974 when the medical school was new to the Medical Center “to promote friendship among its members and to be of service to the Medical School and the community”. A 1978 bake sale started the scholarship fund. In addition to scholarships and book money, the organization has donated to many institutions and programs. Female faculty were admitted as of the 1985-1986 school year.