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Notice d'autorité
Medical school

Texas Medical Center

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n85810360
  • Collectivité
  • 1946-

The Texas Medical Center is a comprehensive medical community located south of downtown Houston. It comprises 54 institutions, including four medical and seven nursing schools, 21 hospitals, three level-I trauma centers [8], eight specialty institutions, and academic and research institutions for many other health-related disciplines[9]. The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center is among the top-ranked cancer hospitals in the country[10]. As of 2017, it is one of the largest medical centers in the world[7].

The Texas Medical Center was proposed by Horace Wilkins, Col. William Bates, and John H. Freeman, the trustees of the M.D. Anderson Foundation. Established by cotton magnate Monroe Dunaway Anderson in 1936[1], the Foundation supported a variety of small causes until Anderson’s death in 1939, at which point the trustees, with the encouragement of Ernst Bertner, M.D., and Frederick Elliott, D.D.S., decided the funds should be used to build a medical center on par with Johns Hopkins and the Mayo Clinic[2]. When, in 1941, the state legislature approved an act to create a cancer hospital[3], the Anderson Foundation trustees secured Houston as the location for the M.D. Anderson Cancer Hospital, which would become first component of the medical center. The Texas Medical Center would be located on a site adjacent to Hermann Hospital, which had opened south of downtown in 1925.

The Texas Medical Center was officially incorporated in 1946 and Bertner was appointed president, replaced at the Cancer Hospital by R. Lee Clark, M.D. The Cancer Hospital was quickly joined by the Dental College, by then affiliated with the University of Texas[16], and Baylor University College of Medicine, which moved from Waco. The Anderson Foundation made grants to Methodist Hospital, Shriners Hospital for Crippled Children, St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital, Texas Children’s Hospital, a new building for Hermann Hospital, and for a library[15].

The Texas Medical Center grew quickly and has provided a home for innovators such as heart surgeons Michael DeBakey and Denton Cooley; William Spencer and his work on rehabilitation of paralysis patients; trauma surgeon and medevac pioneer James “Red” Duke; and Nobel Prize-winning pharmacology researcher Ferid Murad[17].

SOURCES:

[1-5] TMC History 1971
[6] Handbook of Texas Online, Ernst W. Bertner.
[7] Facts and Figures, About Houston, City of Houston, 2017 July 24, www.houstontx.gov/abouthouston/houstonfacts.html
[8] Texas Trauma Facilities, Texas Health and Human Services, Texas Department of Health and Human Services, 2017 July 24, https://www.dshs.texas.gov/emstraumasystems/etrahosp.shtm.
[9] “Texas Medical Center: Houston is where the world comes for treatment”, About Houston, Greater Houston Convention & Visitors Bureau, 2017 July 24, https://www.visithoustontexas.com/about-houston/texas-medical-center/
[10] Institutional profile, Facts and History, 2017 July 24, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, https://www.mdanderson.org/about-md-anderson/facts-history/institutional-profile.html.
[12] Handbook of Texas Online
[13] New York Times, 1994 May 05, online.
[11] Mary Schiflett obituary, Houston Chronicle online, January 19, 2007.
[14] Bryant Boutwell, Ph.D, Bout Time blog, 2014 January 31
[15] TMC History 1971, p178
[16] Handbook of Texas Online, University of Texas Dental Branch
[17] TMC News, 2014 August 19

University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n84075298
  • Collectivité
  • 1972-

The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston is a public health science educational institution. It was created in 1972 by the University of Texas and comprises the UTHealth School of Dentistry (1905), UTHealth School of Biomedical Informatics (1972), the UT MD Anderson Cancer Center UTHealth Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences (1963, renamed 2017), the John P. and Kathrine G. McGovern School of Medicine (1969, renamed 2015), UTHealth School of Public Health (1969), and the Jane and Robert Cizik School of Nursing (1972, renamed 2017). Its teaching hospitals include Children’s Memorial Hermann Hospital, Memorial Hermann-Texas Medical Center, and Harris Health Lyndon B. Johnson Hospital. It also encompasses a long list of smaller centers and institutions that perform work specialized to different illnesses, disciplines, and areas of interest.

University of Texas Medical School at Houston

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n80082446
  • Collectivité
  • 1970-

The University of Texas Medical School at Houston was approved by Governor Preston Smith in 1969. Cheves Smythe, M.D. was appointed the first dean. The first class enrolled in 1970 but was divided among three cities; the first class to complete all its studies in Houston enrolled in 1971. Its John J. Freeman Building was completed in 1972 and the School joined the UT Health Science Center consortium in 1973. The Medical School building sustained serious flood damage in both 1976 and 2001; the damage by Tropical Storm Allison took three years to rebuild. It was renamed the John P. and Kathrine G. McGovern Medical School in 2015 following a gift from the McGovern Foundation.

Baylor College of Medicine

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n79127036
  • Collectivité
  • 1900-

Baylor College of Medicine is a private medical school located in the Texas Medical Center. It opened in October 1900 in Dallas, Texas, by Albert Ferdinand Beddoe, A.B., M.D., and Samuel Hollingsworth Stout, A.B., M.D., as the University of Dallas Medical Department (there was no such school as the University of Dallas). In 1903 it joined with Baylor University and became the Baylor University College of Medicine. In 1943, the M.D. Anderson Foundation invited the College of Medicine to join the fledgling Texas Medical Center in Houston, so in July of that year it reopened in a former Sears, Roebuck, and Company warehouse. It moved into the current Roy and Lillie Cullen Building in 1947. Michael DeBakey joined as chair of the surgery department in 1948. The College expanded both physically and by reputation through the 1950s and 1960s.
In 1969, the College of Medicine separated from the University and officially changed its name to Baylor College of Medicine. In addition to the medical school, it has a Graduate School of Biomedical Science, the School of Allied Health Professions, and the National School of Tropical Medicine.

University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. School of Public Health

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n79121188
  • Collectivité
  • 1969-

The Texas Legislature approved the formation of a school of public health in 1947 but did not allocate funds until 1967; the first class entered in the fall 1969. It became part of the UT Health Science Center when that was organized in 1972. The main campus remains in Houston in the Texas Medical Center but there are satellite campuses, tailored to the needs of their respective communities, in San Antonio (1979), El Paso (1992), Dallas (1998), Brownsville (2000), and Austin (2007). The school comprises four departments: Biostatistics and Data Science; Epidemiology, Human Genetics, and Environmental Sciences; Health Promotion and Behavioral Sciences; and Management, Policy, and Community Health. The school also supports thirteen research centers.

University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n50080776
  • Collectivité
  • 1970-

in 1962 there was a request, led by TMC co-founder R. Lee Clark, MD, to establish a graduate school of biomedical sciences in Houston. The UT Graduate School of BIomedical Sciences was approved by Texas House Bill 500 on October 14, 1963, with approval for Master’s of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in “biology, including, but not restricted to, areas of emphasis in radiobiology, biomathematics, generics, cytology, fine structure-electron microscope-analysis, molecular biology, with biochemistry and biophysics, microbiology, and virology. Biochemistry including, but not restricted to, areas of emphasis in molecular biology and chemical physiology. Physics including, but not restricted to, areas of emphasis in biophysics, nuclear medicine, and isotope studies. . . . with the stipulation that all areas of emphasis to be added in the future shall come within the three categories listed above (I.e. biology, biochemistry, and physics) and that the areas of emphasis be restricted to biomedical sciences that are adapted to the research facilities of the M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute.”
The University of Texas Medical School was established in 1970, also under the administration of the University of Texas, and its basic science faculty were assimilated into the Graduate School, where before they had worked through MD Anderson Cancer Hospital or occasionally the Schools of Dentistry and Public Health. In 1972, all of these schools were collected into the UT Health Science Center. As of 2001, graduate degrees in biomedical science that would formerly have been awarded through the UT Health Science Center or UT MD Anderson Cancer Center would be awarded through the GSBS. The name was updated in 2017 to The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center UTHealth Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences to reflect the longstanding partnership between the two institutions.