Showing 1147 results

Authority record

University of Texas Speech and Hearing Institute

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n87117925
  • Corporate body
  • 1951-1992

The University of Texas Speech and Hearing Institute was founded in 1951 as the Houston Speech and Hearing Clinic. It joined the UT system in 1971 and for a year was the Division of Communicative Disorders of the University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston. In October 1972 it was renamed the University of Texas Speech and Hearing Institute at Houston and became part of the UT Health Science Center at Houston. Struggling with reduced state funding, fewer resources for faculty and research, and diminished demand for educational programs, its services were taken over by the United Way of the Texas Gulf Coast and the Institute closed on October 31, 1992.

Blocker, Truman G.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n87853438
  • Person
  • 1909-1984

Truman Graves Blocker, MD, was born 1909 April 17 in West Point, Mississippi. He attended school in Sherman, Texas and graduated from Austin College in 1929. He earned an MD from the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston in 1933, followed by an internship at the Graduate Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, and a year’s residency in surgery again in Galveston at John Sealy Hospital. He spent a short time as an instructor in surgery at the Columbia University-affiliated Presbyterian Hospital in New York City before returning to Galveston again in 1936 to take a position at UTMB as an assistant professor of surgery. He served as a surgeon first in the Air Force and then in the Army between 1942 and 1946, where he specialized in reconstructive plastic surgery. When he returned to UTMB in 1946 he became professor and head of the new department of plastic and maxillofacial surgery. Blocker’s wife, Dr. Virginia Blocker, was also a physician and, after the 1947 Texas City Disaster, they co-published a survey of the casualties. Blocker would eventually publish or co-publish 182 items, mostly on treatment and care of burn victims.
In addition to his research and teaching responsibilities, Blocker served in a diverse and complex variety of administrative positions, enabling him to influence the growth and expansion of UTMB. He was instrumental in convincing the Shriners to choose Galveston as the location for their burn hospital, and he retained an interest in military medicine for the rest of his life. UTMB commemorated him by renaming its Moody Medical Library for him after his death in 1984.

Jablon, Seymour

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n87894758
  • Person
  • 1918-2012

Seymour Jablon was born June 2, 1918, in New York, and died April 9, 2012. He completed a bachelor’s degree at the College of the City of New York in 1939. He earned a Master’s in mathematics and mathematical statistics from Columbia University in 1941. He enlisted in the Army in 1942 until 1946 when he became a statistician for the US Bureau of Labor Statistics. Jablon taught mathematics briefly at Rutgers before taking a job with the National Research Council in Washington, D.C., in 1948. He joined the ABCC in 1955 and was Chief of the Department of Statistics at the ABCC from 1960 to 1963, and 1968 to 1971. He was the associate director at the Medical Follow-up Agency at the National Research Council from 1963 to 1968 and then again from 1971 to 1977.

Texas Woman's University

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n87926315
  • Corporate body
  • 1901-0000

Texas Woman's University was founded in 1901 in Denton, Texas, as the Texas Industrial Institute and College for the Education of White Girls of the State of Texas in the Arts and Sciences; the current name dates to 1957. It began the first nationally accredited nursing program, affiliated with Dallas' Parkland Hospital, in Texas in 1950 and began awarding doctorates in 1953. It became integrated in 1961 and coeducational in 1994. The health science and nursing programs have additional campuses in Dallas and Houston.

Woman's Hospital of Texas

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n87947718
  • Corporate body
  • 1976-

The Woman’s Hospital of Texas was founded in 1976 and specializes in care focused on the needs of women.

University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n88044598
  • Corporate body
  • 1944-

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center is named for Monroe Dunaway Anderson who, with his brother-in-law Will Clayton, operated what came to be the biggest cotton company in the world by the earliest years of the Twentieth Century. When he died in 1939, his MD Anderson Foundation received $19 million from his estate. In 1941 when the Texas Legislature set aside $500,000 for a cancer hospital and research center, the Anderson Foundation agreed to match funds if the institution were located in Houston, in the new Texas Medical Center, which was also an Anderson Fund project, and if it were named for their benefactor.
The M.D. Anderson Hospital for Cancer Research at the University of Texas opened in 1944 and operated out of surplus World War II army barracks; the converted mansion The Oaks, of the James A. Baker estate near Rice University; and 46 beds leased from a local hospital (which hospital?) before moving into the original building of its current location in 1954. TMC co-founder R. Lee Clark served as the first full-time director. The world’s first cobalt-60 radiotherapy unit, designed by UTMDA’s Dr. Gilbert H. Fletcher and Dr. Leonard Grimmett, began treating patients in the underground (for safety) clinic on February 22, 1954. The rest of the patients were transferred to the new building three weeks later and the hospital was formally dedicated on October 23. The name was changed to the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute in 1955. The hospital and its capabilities expanded rapidly over the next decades; it installed the first high-voltage Sagittaire linear accelerator for radiation therapy in 1970 and began the US’s first interferon trials in 1978. The name was changed to the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in 1988.

Ellett, William H.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n88052231
  • Person

William "Bill" H. Ellett is a physicist. He graduated from Rensselear Polytechnic Institute with a B.S. in physics. He earned a masters of science in physics at New York University and a doctorate in radiation physics at Royal Postgraduate Medical School at the University of London. From 1984 to 1992, he served as a consultant for the Radiation Effects Research Foundation at Hiroshima. From 1985 to 1991, he was a a senior program officer on the Board on Radiation Effects Research, Commission on Life Sciences with the National Academy of Sciences.

Houston District Dental Society

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n88095511
  • Corporate body
  • 1904

The Greater Houston Dental Society, formerly the Houston District Dental Society, was founded in 1904 and serves as the Houston-area chapter of the Texas Dental Association and the American Dental Association. It seeks to provide public and professional health education.

Harrington, Paul R.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n88169070
  • Person
  • 1911-1980

Dr. Paul Harrington (September 27, 1911- November 29, 1980) was an orthopedic surgeon and former chief of surgical services at TIRR. He died Nov. 29, 1980.He was interested in polio and scoliosis. He developed a surgical procedure for the correction of curvature of the spine.

Joseph Lewis Belsky, MD

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n88636538
  • Person
  • 1927-

Dr. Joseph Lewis Belsky was born March 14, 1927. He earned his undergraduate degree in chemistry from Drew University in New Jersey in 1949, followed by a master’s in chemistry fro Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut, in 1951 and, finally, an M.D. in 1955 from Albany Medical College in Albany, New York. He became board certified in internal medicine in 1963. He worked for a short time in private practice but spent the majority of his career as an endocrinologist in hospitals in Boston and in Connecticut. He was also a lecturer at Yale University School of Medicine.

Dr. Belsky was Chief of Medicine for the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC), a committee formed to study the long-term effects of radiation exposure on the residents of Nagasaki and Hiroshima, Japan, from 1969-1972 (the organization is now known as the Radiation Effects Research Foundation or RERF).

In 1999, Dr. Belsky was awarded a Mastership by the American College of Physicians.

Lange, Robert D.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n88639606
  • Person
  • 1920-1999

Robert Dale Lange was born in Redwood Falls, Minnesota on January 24, 1920. He attended high school at North St. Paul High School in St. Paul, Minnesota. After graduated in 1937 he went to the Macalester College, St. Paul, Minnesota. In 1941 he received his Bachelor of Science. From 1941 to 1944, he studied medicine at Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri. Robert D. Lange received the Jackson Johnson Scholarship all throughout medical school. He was the recipient of the Jackson Johnson Book Prize awarded to the graduating senior with the highest academic average at Washington University Medical School in 1944. Dr. Lange completed an internship in internal medicine at Barnes Hospital, St. Louis, Missouri, 1944-1945. Then Dr. Lange went on to serve as Assistant Resident in Medicine, University of Minnesota Hospital, Minneapolis, 1945-1946. He continued his postgraduate studies as a Fellow and Instructor in Medicine under Dr. C.V. Moore, Division of Hematology, Washington University School of Medicine, 1948-1951.

Dr. Lange served active duty in the United States Army as a Major at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Washington, D.C. He was involved in the active reserves and remains so, 1942-1956, 1956-present. He was promoted to Colonel in 1969, and presently attached to the 489 Civil Affairs Company, Knoxville, Tennessee. Dr. Lange served in the Department of Medicine of the ABCC from 1951-1953. In 1953, he and his family returned to the United States. He immediately joined the academic world. He taught at these medical schools the University of Minnesota, Washington University and the Medical College of Georgia. In 1964, Knoxville, Tennessee became home for the Lange family. There Dr. Lange began his long association with the University of Tennessee. His first appointment was Research Professor at the University of Tennessee Memorial Research Center in 1964. He was promoted to a full professor in 1970. Over the years Dr. Lange accepted a number of chairmanship and directorship appointments with the University's Memorial Research Center and Center for Health Sciences.

Dr. Lange has written extensively in the area of hematology. His bibliography includes: 71 abstracts, 25 book chapters, 156 journal articles. From 1974-1977, Dr. Lange served on the editorial board of Experimental Hematology. He has written reviews for the following premier journals in medicine and the field of hematology: American Journal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology: Archives of Internal Medicine: Biochemical Medicine; Blood, Journal of Hematology: Experimental Hematology: Journal of Clinical Investigation; Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine; New England Journal of Medicine.

Dr. Lange has been a very active faculty member at the University of Tennessee. He has trained thirteen post doctoral fellows and graduate students. Dr. Lange been successful in obtaining grants and other external support for research. Most recently he was awarded $942,513 from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for a ten-year study - "Regulation of erythropoiesis in rats during space flight." Some of the funded organizations have been: National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, American Cancer Society, Atomic Energy Commission, Physicians Medical Education and Research Foundation, John A. Hartford Foundation, Biomedical Research Support, McDonnellDouglas Corporation, and National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

Dr. Lange has been an exchange visitor of the United States Academy of Science since 1968. He has delivered forty lectures to selected hospitals, medical schools, and research institutes throughout the United States and several foreign countries.

The Physicians Recognition Award from the American Medical Association was presented to Dr. Lange in 1969, 1972 and 1979. His honors included membership on Pi Phi Epsilon, Sigma X, Alpha Omega Alpha.

Dr. Lange has been very active as a physician, administrator and professor. He has medical licensure in the state of Tennessee and board certification from the American Board of Internal Medicine. He is a member or fellow in fifteen societies. They are: American Federation of Clinical Research (Emeritus), Society of Experimental Biology and Medicine, Central Society for Clinical Research, Southern Society for Clinical Investigation, American Society of Hematology (Emeritus), International Society of Hematology (Fellow) American College of Physicians (Fellow), Knoxville Society of Internal Medicine, American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Association of University Professors, Knoxville Academy of Medicine, Tennessee Medical Association, American Medical Association, International Society of Experimental Hematology, Society of Research Administrators. Dr. Lange has served on ten committees as a member and officer. These include: Chairman, Southern Blood Club, 1970; Chairman, Erythropoietin Workshop, American Society of Hematology Meeting, 1970, Chairman, National Heart and Lung Institute Erythropoietin Subcommittee of the American Society of Hematology, 1971. Now a member of this committee. A member of the Program Committee, Tennessee regional Meeting, American College of Physicians, 1971. Chairman, Oak Ridge Associated Universities/Oak Ridge National Laboratories Committee on Human Studies, 1975; A member of the UT Hospital's Executive Committee (ex-officio), Bylaws Committee, Graduate Committee, Planning Committee, and Professional Library Services Committee, 1977-; Chairman, Library Committee, Knoxville Academy of Medicine, 1978; Chairman, Human Participation Committee, Oak Ridge Associated Universities and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1978; Member, ad hoc Erythropoietin Committee, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, 1978-present.

Dr. Lange became Professor Emeritus in the Department of Medical Biology College of Medicine, University of Tennessee Medical Center in 1985. He is still on active staff at University Hospital, Knoxville, Tennessee. Mrs. Lange volunteers at a medical library and their son resides in Houston, Texas and daughter in Atlanta, Georgia. In November of 1995 Dr.Lange, Mrs. Lange and their daughter visited the Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center Library. Dr. Lange died March 16, 1999.

Children's Nutrition Research Center

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n88669068
  • Corporate body
  • 1978-

The Children’s Nutrition Research Center was created in 1978 as a joint venture among Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children’s Hospital, and the USDA Agricultural Research Service. It is one of six USDA nutritional research centers. The CNRC’s areas of study are nutritional metabolism in mothers, infants, and children; childhood obesity prevention; pediatric clinical nutrition; molecular, cellular, and regulatory aspects of nutrition during development; and developmental determinants of obesity in infants and children.

Smythe, Cheves M.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n89664729
  • Person
  • 1924-2020

Cheves McCord Smythe was born in Charleston, South Carolina in 1924. He was born into a well-established South Carolina family. Smythe received his undergraduate degree from Yale College in 1943, and his medical degree in 1947 from Harvard Medical School. He completed his internship and residency at the Boston City Hospital. Next, he served as a Research Fellow at the Presbyterian Hospital in New York. Following this, he returned to the Boston City Hospital as a Chief Resident. From 1942-1966, Smythe served in the U.S. Naval Reserve. He was a part of the Medical Corps and became a Lieutenant Commander. He retired from the Naval Reserve in 1966. Beginning in 1955, Smythe started as an Instructor in Medicine at the Medical College of South Carolina. He eventually becoming an Assistant Professor of Medicine and finally Dean. He remained as Dean from 1963 until his departure in 1966. The following four years he served as Assistant Director and Director of the Department of Academic Affairs at the Association of American Medical Colleges. The bulk of his career was spent at The University of Texas Medical School at Houston, where he became the first dean of the school in 1970. He would remain as dean until 1975. Smythe continued his profession at the university until 1995, serving as Professor, Adjunct Professor, and Dean Pro Tem. Smythe continued his career abroad when he became the Dean at the Aga Khan University in Karachi, Pakistan. He served in this role from 1982 to 1985. His involvement with the school continued, and he returned as Professor and Chairman of the Department of Medicine from 1990 to 1991. Smythe had many hospital appointments including the Hermann Hospital, Memorial Southwest Hospital, and the LBJ Hospital. He was also a member of many medical organizations and received many honors and awards. In addition, he was the author of numerous publications. For a complete list of accomplishments please visit Smythe’s vitae and bibliography.

Dr. Smythe died May 11, 2020, in Charleston, South Carolina.

Tames, George

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n90600652
  • Person
  • 1919-1994

For all George Tames photographs license the suggested attribution will be:
"Photograph by George Tames. Courtesy of McGovern Historical Center, Texas Medical Center Library with permission of the George Tames Estate, IC 077 Medical World News Photograph Collection, [Item ID]"

A suggested shorter alternate attribution should be:
"Photograph by George Tames. Courtesy of Texas Medical Center Library with permission of the George Tames Estate, [Item ID]."

University of Texas School of Nursing

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n91091727
  • Corporate body
  • 1972-

The Jane and Robert Cizik School of Nursing at UTHealth opened in 1972 in the Nurses’ Residence at Hermann Hospital as the University of Texas School of Nursing. It was to be the clinical campus of the UT System’s school of nursing, which was based at UTMB in Galveston. It moved into the Hermann Professional Building Annex shortly after, then to the former Prudential Life Building at 1100 Holcombe in 1974. The Houston setting became an official campus of the UT System Schools of Nursing in 1973, alongside Galveston, Austin, San Antonio, El Paso, and Fort Worth/Arlington. The first class graduated in 1974. Also in 1974 the School proposed a Master’s of Nursing degree (the first students would enroll in 1976) and specialized programs in gerontology, oncology, and psychiatric mental health nursing. In 1976, the School of Nursing joined the UT Health Science Center. The school continued to expand, adding specialized courses of study and Doctorate of Nursing degrees. It was renamed the Cizik School of Nursing in 2017.

Hermann Hospital

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n92089041
  • Corporate body
  • 1925-1999

Hermann Hospital was a public hospital endowed by George Hermann (1843-1914) with a fortune accumulated through investments in oil and real estate. The hospital opened south of downtown Houston in the summer of 1925. It merged with Memorial Hospital in 1999 to create Memorial Hermann Health System. The original Spanish-style building is now part of Children's Memorial Hermann in the northwest corner of the Medical Center.

Desmond, Murdina MacFarquhar

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n94801680
  • Person
  • 1916-2003

Dr. Desmond was born in the Hebrides Islands of Scotland in 1916. Her family immigrated to the United States when she was 7. She attended Smith College on scholarship, graduating in 1938, and obtained her M.D. in 1942 from Temple School of Medicine. Following her internship and six months of pediatric residency, Dr. Desmond joined the U.S. Naval Reserve as a physician and actively served through World War II, including time at Pearl Harbor.

Postwar, she completed her pediatric training and a fellowship in newborn research. In 1948, she moved to Houston, Texas to join the faculty of Baylor College of Medicine in the Pediatric Department which at that time consisted of four faculty members and two residents. In 1950, Baylor became affiliated with the former Jefferson Davis Hospital and a newborn service was established. Dr. Desmond became the first head of the newborn care section in the Pediatric Department.

In 1956, Dr. Desmond and two other physicians were alarmed at the death rate from staphylococcus infections at Jefferson Davis Hospital, the then city-county hospital. The doctors declared the nursery unsafe and closed it to any more admissions. Shortly thereafter, Dr. Desmond began the first neonatal intensive care unit in the nation at the hospital. Dr. Desmond also worked with infants born with drug addictions. She developed the transitional nursery in which at risk infants were under close observation for potential medical problems. Infants who were seriously ill were placed in a separate unit, which became the first newborn intensive care unit in the southwestern states of the United States. Until Jefferson Davis Hospital closed, Dr. Desmond served as director of nurseries and as pediatric coordinator of its Maternal and Infant Care project.

During the outbreak of rubella in 1963-64, Dr. Desmond worked with about 200 affected infants and children. She recognized that many at-risk infants, whom medical care was able to save, developed conditions that required comprehensive evaluation and long-term care. In 1973 she became the director of the Leopold Meyer Center for Developmental Pediatrics at Texas Children's hospital. During this period she was on the team which cared for David Vetter, the "Bubble Boy." The Desmond Neonatal Developmental Follow-up Clinic, named for Dr. Desmond, was established in 1994 to provide logitudinal follow-up and neurodevelopmental assessments for pre-term babies.

Dr. Desmond received the Apgar Award from the American Academy of Pediatrics; the Stanley Kalinski Award from the Texas Pediatric Society; and awards from Smith College and Temple University among others.

Dr. Desmond married James L. Desmond who she met while serving in the Naval Reserve. They were married after the war and then moved to Houston, Texas, where her husband had a dental practice until his death in 1969. She and her husband had two children. Dr. Desmond passed away in 2003.

Bergstrom, Nancy

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n95034328
  • Person

Spencer, William

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n95803665
  • Person
  • 1922-2009

William Albert Spencer born on February 16, 1922 in Oklahoma City. He went to Georgetown University for his Bachelor’s degree and was first in his class in medical school at John Hopkins University. Beginning in 1951 Dr. Spencer would lead staff at Baylor College of Medicine to address the polio epidemic. This research paved the way for Baylor to become one of the most prominent rehabilitation facilities in the country. He would become founder of The Institute of Rehabilitation and Research, or TIRR, which opened its doors on May 30, 1959. Today the hospital is officially part of the Memorial Hermann Hospital system. Throughout his life Dr. Spencer would treat patients, often children and young adults, and conduct research regarding traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injuries. Dr. Spencer served twenty-eight years as TIRR’s president and became known as the “Father of Modern Rehabilitation”; hospitals around the globe modeled their rehabilitation programs after it (Wendler, 2009, p.16). The TIRR was a facility ahead of its time under Dr.Spencer’s leadership. After the development of personal computers, Dr.Spencer petitioned IBM to link the computers (now known as networking) at TIRR and Baylor College of Medicine.
In his nonmedical life, Dr. Spencer would tinker with a number of inventions or other projects. These engineering projects would lead him to develop the physiography, which ended up being an early version of its predecessor the EKG. Dr. Spencer was married twice, first to Helen Hart in 1945 and then to Jean Amspoker in 1984. Jean predeceased him in 2005. Dr. Spencer died on February 18, 2009.

Seybold Foundation and Clinic

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n97078086
  • Corporate body
  • 1951-

Dr. Mavis Kelsey, founder and senior partner of the Kelsey-Seybold Clinic, P.A. of Houston, became acquainted with Dr. William Seybold first at UTMB and then more closely when both were working at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Kelsey, Seybold, and Dr. William Leary discussed the idea of establishing a group practice.
Kelsey moved to Houston in 1949 and started a practice at the Hermann Professional Building. Seybold followed in 1950 and Leary in 1951. The Kelsey-Seybold-Leary Clinic first resided on the fourteenth and eighth floors of the Hermann Professional Building.
Other members of the Kelsey-Leary Clinic were Dr. John R. Kelsey, Jr., Dr. Mavis Kelsey's brother, and Dr. Albert O. Owens, psychiatrist from the Menninger Clinic. Dr. Seybold left the group in 1952 but returned in 1961, serving as Chief of the General and Thoracic Surgery Department. The physicians continued to practice together as the Kelsey-Leary-Seybold Clinic up until 1965, when Dr. Leary left to join the M.D. Anderson Hospital Staff. The Clinic was renamed the KelseySeybold Clinic.
Through the years the Clinic has changed its location, expanded its services, established satellite clinics, operated branches through the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, headed programs for the armed services and has opened the innovative Fitness Center.
In May of 1979, the partnership was converted to a Professional Association. The Kelsey-Seybold, P.A., also organized by the physician staff of the clinic were the Clinic Drugs, Inc., Kelsey-Seybold Leasehold, Medical Equipment Co., Inc. and Professional Supply Company, Inc.
The Kelsey-Seybold Foundation is a chartered, charitable foundation. The Foundation fosters the advancement of medicine by sponsoring medical research and education, especially cancer research and childcare.
The Kelsey-Seybold Clinic provides a diversity of services ranging from specialized, in depth treatment, comprehensive fitness health maintenance programs and the promotion of scientific research.

Moloney, William Curry

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n98044773
  • Person
  • 1907-1998

William Curry Moloney was born in Boston Massachusetts on December 19, 1907. He died in 1998.

He studied medicine at Tufts College and graduated in 1932 with a Doctor of Medicine degree. In 1961, he was awarded an honorary Doctorate of Science from the College of the Holy Cross. Dr. Moloney was associated with the Medical School of Tufts University for forty years. He began his career in 1934 as an assistant, then rose to a full professor in 1971 and retired in 1974. Dr. Moloney became Emeritus Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School in 1974- and Emeritus Physician and Chief of the Hematology Division, Peter Bent Brigham Hospital in 1967. He also served concurrent posts: Consultant, Boston Hospitals, 1938-, consultant, Boston City Hospitals, 1948-, director of clinical laboratories.

He is a fellow or member of the following organizations: American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Federation of Clinical Research, American Medical Association, American College of Physicians, Association of American Physicians.

Dr. Moloney served in Japan with the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) as the Chief of the Department of Medicine from 1952-1954. His hematology research at ABCC allowed him to work scientists from many departments.

Dr. Moloney and his wife, Josephine "Jo" (O'Brien) had four children.

Chapman, Don

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n99254652
  • Person
  • 1916-2007

Donald Wilton Chapman was born in Bridgewater, Iowa, on May 21, 1916 and earned both his BA and MD from the University of Iowa. He served as a major in the US Army Medical Corps in the European Theater during World War II. Chapman moved to Houston in 1944 to become one of the ten original faculty members of Baylor College of Medicine. He taught and practiced for fifty years, was a member of numerous professional organizations, and taught as a visiting professor in medical schools around the United States and the world. The Harris County Medical Society awarded him the John P. McGovern Compleat Physician Award in 1976. Dr. Chapman died on May 3, 2007 in Houston.

Boutwell, Bryant

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n99804345
  • Person

Dr. Bryant Boutwell was the Associate Vice President for Accreditation and International Programs at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. He held John P. McGovern, M.D. Professorship in Oslerian Medicine at the UT Medical School at Houston.

Beebe, Gilbert

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no00084446
  • Person
  • 1912-2003

Gilbert Wheeler Beebe was born April 3. 1912 in Mahwah, New Jersey. He graduated from Dartmouth College in 1933 and completed a Ph.D. from Columbia University in 1942.
Beebe was a captain in the US Army and served in the Office of the Surgeon General during World War II. After the war, he worked with Michael DeBakey to set up the Medical Follow-Up Agency at the National Academy of Sciences. He also worked with Seymour Jablon, also through the MFUA, to reorganize the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission in Japan. Beebe remained director of the MFUA until he retired in 1977. Beebe joined the National Cancer Institute in 1977 and led studies on thyroid cancer and leukemia risk among radiation-exposed Belarusians and Ukrainians after the Chernobyl disaster in 1986. He retired from NCI in 2002 but remained a Scientist Emeritus. Beebe died on March 3, 2003, in Washington, D.C., and is buried in Mahwah Cemetery.

Karnaky, Karl John

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2003070674
  • Person
  • 1907-1988

Karl Karnaky was born November 7, 1907, in Barham, Louisiana and died May 29, 1988, in Houston, Texas. His parents were from Germany and Austria-Hungary. Karnaky graduated in pre-medicine from Rice University (then the Rice Institute) in 1930 and went on to study medicine at UTMB. He registered for the draft in 1940; he was working out of the Medical Arts Building at the time. In 1940, he treated a five-year-old Houston girl for tumor-induced precocious puberty; the case was compared to that of Lina Medina, a Peruvian girl who gave birth at age five. He taught at Baylor College of Medicine in the late 1940s. He was the director of Menstrual Disorder Clinic at Jefferson Davis and was on staff at Hermann, Park View, Heights, St. Joseph’s, Memorial, and Methodist Hospitals. In the 1960s and 1970s he worked at the Obstetrical and Gynecological Research Institute [and Foundation], Houston.

Russell, William O.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2003084619
  • Person
  • 1910-1997

Dr. William Ogburn Russell, Jr., was born in March 24, 1910 in San Jose, California, and frew up on the Russell Ranch near Sacramento. He earned his MD from Stanford University in 1938. He completed his residency at the Mallory Institute in Boston, Massachusetts, and then returned to California to practice pathology in Santa Barbara. He moved to Houston in 1948 the first chair of the pathology department at UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, where he remained until 1977. After his retirement from UT MDA he moved to Florida and spent ten years as director of pathology at North Ridge Medical Center in Fort Lauderdale. Russell was married to Marolyn Cowart Russell, MD, who was also faculty at MD Anderson. He died in August 2, 1997, and is interred at Woodland Cemetery, Woodland, California.
Thirteen linear feet of his papers are available at the UC Davis archives.

Cady, Lee D.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2004020308
  • Person
  • 1896-1987

Lee D. Cady, MD (1896-1987) graduated Washington School of Medicine in 1922. He served in both World War I and World War II. During World War II he served as the commanding officer of the 21st General Hospital in Northern Africa and Europe. Upon returning home after World War II, he assumed the role of director of the V.A. Hospitals in Dallas then Houston before his retirement from the Houston V.A. Hospital in 1963. He is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.

Hartgraves, Ruth

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2004021115
  • Person
  • 1991-1995

Ruth Hartgraves, MD, a Houston obstetrician and gynecologist who delivered more than 3,000 Houstonians and pioneered the trail for women in medicine during the span of her 50 year career, died October 17, 1995, at the age of 93. A native Texan, Dr. Hartgraves was born October 24, 1901 and moved to the Houston area during the 1930s to attend the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) in Galveston. She graduated from UTMB's School of Medicine in 1932, and thereafter completed an internship at the New England Hospital for Women and Children in Boston, and a residency at the New York Infirmary for Women and Children.

Dr. Hartgraves begain her career in Houston in 1935 and held appointments at Methodist, Hermann, Memorial, St. Luke's and Jefferson Davis Hospitals before retiring from practice in 1987. She was also a faculty member of Baylor College of Medicine for almost 30 years.

Dr. Hartgraves was the recipient of the 1992 Distinguished Professional Women's Award which is presented by the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. This award was presented in recognition of Dr. Hartgraves' outstanding achievements in Texas and the nation, for the significant contributions she made to her professional discipline, and for her pioneering spirit to mentor women and to provide a positive role model.

In 1985, she was awarded the Distinguished Alumnus Award from the University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Hartgraves was also the recipient of the 1980 Ashbel Smith Distinguished Alumnus Award granted by the UTMB School of Medicine alumni to graduates who have made significant contributions to the medical profession and to mankind.

She served as an organizer and the first President of the Houston branch of the American Medical Women's Association (AMWA), as well as President of the national AMWA organization. In 1975, her efforts earned her the AMWA's highest honor, the Elizabeth Blackwell Award, presented annually to a person making an outstanding contribution to the cause of women in medicine. Dr. Hartgraves was the first Texas physician to be so recognized.

She was a charter member of St. Luke's United Methodist Church and had a life-long record of involvement in community affairs, including the Houston Grand Opera, the Houston Ballet Society, and the Blue Bird Circle Clinic for Pediatric Neurology.

Houston Chronicle, Thursday, October 19, 1995.

Crain, Darrell

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2004072451
  • Person
  • 1910-1995

Darrell Clayton Crain, Jr., was born in Washington, D.C., on March 29, 1910 and earned his MD from George Washington University. He worked at Walter Reed Military Hospital before going into private practice in 1937. During World War II, he served in the Army Medical Corps in the Pacific Theater and was awarded two Bronze Stars. Dr. Crain practiced in Washington for fifty years and founded the Rheumatology Clinic at George Washington University. He retired in 1987 and died in Chevy Chase, Maryland, on July 22, 1995. He is buried at Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia.

Hamilton, Howard B.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2005037463
  • Person
  • 1918-2007

Dr. Howard Beye Hamilton was born in Oak Park Illinois on December 4, 1918. He graduated from the University of Rochester in New York in 1941 and from Yale University School of Medicine in 1945. Hamilton served in the United States Navy from 1942-1945, during World War II. In the late 1940s and early 1950s Hamilton conducted research at Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard University, the Long Island School of Medicine, the New York College of Surgeons, and the University of Tokyo in Japan.

In 1956 Dr. Hamilton moved to Hiroshima, Japan, where he lived for the next thirty years. After his move to Japan, Hamilton served as the Chief of Clinical Laboratories for the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) from 1956 until its dissolution in 1975. Hamilton worked in the same capacity for the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF), which succeeded the ABCC, until 1984. Between 1984 and 1986 Dr. Hamilton began transitioning into retirement; he continued to work as a consultant for the RERF during this time.

Dr. Hamilton was a consummate scholar and published extensively thoughout his career. Hamilton published papers on topics including endocrinology, steroid chemistry, enzyme kinetics, hemoglobinopathies, the structure and function of hemoglobin, genetic polymorphisms, biochemical genetics, the long term after-effects of exposure to ionizing radiation, and epidemiology of cardio-vascular disease.

Dr. Hamilton's hobbies included playing tennis and practicing the Japanese theatrical art of Noh, which features dramatic masks and carefully defined movements. After his retirement, Dr. Hamilton catalogued Noh and Kabuki works and published Noh plays. In some circles, Dr. Hamilton was known as much for his enthusiastic patronage and participation in Noh as he was for his work with the ABCC and RERF. (Source: Washington Post, May 9, 2007)

Dr. Hamilton died on May 9, 2007 at his home in Falls Church, Virginia. He was 88 years old.

Russell, Walter J.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2005037667
  • Person

Walter J. Russell received his medical education at St. Louis University Medical School. He graduated in 1952 with a Doctor of Medicine degree. He is a member of several learned societies. They are as follows: Diplomate American Board Radiology (radiology), American College of Radiology, American Roentgen Ray Society, Health Physics Society, Nippon Societas Radiologica, New York Academy of Sciences, Pan American Medical Association, Radiological Society of North America, Society of Nuclear Medicine. In July of 1959, he was appointed Chief of the Department of Radiology of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission. Dr. Russell continued his to conduct his research with the ABCC successor organization, the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. His association with RERF continues today. Dr. Russell, his wife Mitsuko and children still live in Hiroshima Japan.

Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education (SACME)

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2006019371
  • Corporate body

The Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education (SACME) was established April 2, 1976 as the Society of Medical College Directors of Continuing Medical Education (SMCDCME). On July 20, 1998, SMCDCME was re-named to its current title. Note: This Chronology was taken from the SACME website, History page www.sacme.org.

1976 Society established on April 2.

1981 First issue of Mobius published (Lucy Ann Geiselman, editor); Research Committee formed (Harold Paul, chair).

1984 Support of the Research and Development Resource Base in CME (Continuing Medical Education) by the Society (Dave Davis); RICME (Research in Continuing Medical Education) I (David Gullion, Lucy Ann Geiselman, chairs); Training of Society interviewers for "the change study."

1985 Change study interviews total 200.

1986-1988 Search for Society logo.

1986 RICME II (Dave Davis, chair).

1987 First issue of INTERCOM published in January (Harold Paul, Dene Murray, editors); Joint plenary session CME/SMCDCME; highlights of the change study.

1988 RICME III (John Parboosingh, Jocelyn Lockyer, chairs); First Congress on CME (Phil R. Manning, Chair); First honorary member of the Society (Cyril Houle); Title change from Mobius to JCEHP (The Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions) with v. 8 (1); Development of first membership brochure (Harold Paul, Dene Murray and others).

1989 Change study published (Robert Fox, Paul Mazmanian, R.Wayne Putnam, editors); Changing and Learning in the Lives of Physicians; Strategic plan for the Society (George Smith); Membership in the Council of Academic Societies (James Leist, Dale Dauphinee).

1990 First meeting of the "Armadillo Society" (past presidents); RICME IV (Nancy Bennett, chair).

1991 Tri-Group leadership formalized by Alliance for Continuing Medical Education (ACME), Association for Hospital Medical Education (AHME) and SMCDCME; Foundation for research established (James Leist); First Distinguished Service Award (Malcolm Watts).

1992 JCEHP reorganized (James Leist); Third Congress on CME (George Smith, chair); SMCDCME incorporated (George Smith and Robert Kristofco); New JCEHP editor appointed (William Felch); Society home established at AAMC (Brownell Anderson); Position paper presented: The Role of Continuing Medical Education in Academic Health Centers (William Easterling).

1993 Distinguished Service Award (Phil Manning); Research Award (Dave Davis); CME Glossary (Joe D'Angelo); Society listserv established (Robert Bollinger); First Society brochure competition (Susan Duncan); New member orientation established at Spring Meeting (Deborah Holmes).

1994 Distinguished Service Award (Julian S. Reinschmidt); Research Award (Robert Fox); Research Endowment Council established (Brian O'Toole); Task force white paper, The connection between continuing medical education and health care reform (George Smith, Gloria Allington).

1995 Request from AAMC for statement on CME; Reorganization of AAMC's Group on Educational Affairs (GEA), continuing education one of four sections; Pew-Glaxo Working Group on the Future of Academic CME Research Award established (Jocelyn Lockyer, recipient); Distinguished Service Award (Martin Shickman); Report of Society working group on Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) essentials and standards, Future directions for medical college continuing medical education (Arnie Bigbee, chair); Request from ACCME for SACME accreditation surveyors.

1996 Four Society task forces and focus groups address the task force report; Society invited to participate in restructuring of the ACCME.

1997 SMCDCME listserv established by Bob Bollinger.

1998 July 20, SMCDCME re-named the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education (SACME).

1999 SACME Web site created by Bob Bollinger.

Harris County Hospital District

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2008077807
  • Corporate body
  • 1965-

The Harris County Hospital District was created by voter referendum in November 1965 and formalized with taxing authority in January 1966. Its creation followed the publication of Jan de Hartog’s The Hospital, an expose of the conditions at Jefferson Davis Charity Hospital (opened 1924). The District replaced a contentious city-county system in which both were responsible for support of the hospital. Quentin Mease was a founder and chairman of the District.
Lyndon B. Johnson General Hospital opened in 1989. In 1990, emergency facilities at Lyndon B. Johnson and Ben Taub (1963) Hospitals were expanded and Harris County residents began to be assigned to each by ZIP code to better manage caseloads. HCHD was renamed Harris Health System in 12.

Mooney, Curtis C.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2010004092
  • Person
  • 1947-0000

Catlin, Francis

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2010040748
  • Person
  • 1925-2014

Francis Irving Catlin was born on December 6, 1925 in Hartford, Connecticut. He received his Doctor of Medicine degree in 1948 from Johns Hopkins University, where he also served two residencies in otolaryngology and head and neck surgery. Dr. Catlin served in the U.S. Air Force Medical Corps from 1950-1952 at the rank of Captain and was the Assistant Chief of E.N.T. Service, U.S. Air Force, 1100th Medical Group, Bolling Air Force Base in Washington, D.C. Dr. Catlin taught and conducted research as a faculty member at Johns Hopkins from 1955-1972. There, he was a part of the Department of Otolaryngology in the School of Medicine, the School of Public Health and Hygiene’s Environmental Medicine Department, and the Public Administration. In 1972 Dr. Catlin and his family moved to Houston, Texas, where he accepted the appointments as Professor at the Baylor College of Medicine in the Department of Otorhinolaryngology; as Chief-of-Service in the department of Otolaryngology at St. Luke’s Episcopal the and Texas Children’s Hospitals; and as the Director of the Speech, Language, and Learning Disorders at the Texas Children’s Hospital. Dr. Catlin died Februayr 24, 2014 and is buried in Church Hill, Maryland. Print finding aid by Margaret Irwin, 1992/1996

Charalampous, Kanellos D.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2010152895
  • Person
  • 1931-

Dr. Kanellos Charalampous was born in Greece in 1931. He attended Texas Christian University and majored in biology and chemistry. Later, he was accepted into Baylor College of Medicine. He began his rotating internship at Houston City Hospital and began his residency at Baylor. In his post-graduate career, he worked in the development and research of psychopharmacology. [Citation: Biographies, and 2015 December 24. KANELLOS CHARALAMPOUS: CONFRONTING THE ZEITGEIST by Barry Blackwell and Kanellos Charalampous (2015): 1-27. International Network for the History of Neuropsychopharmacology. 24 Dec. 2015. Web.]

Burdon, Kenneth Livingston

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2011184007
  • Person
  • 1895-1985

Kenneth Livingston Burdon, MD, was born in Providence, Rhode Island in 1895. He was educated at Brown University, receiving his Ph.D. in 1922. Dr. Burdon served with the U.S. Army Sanitary Medical Corps, (1918-1919), taught at Washington University School of Medicine (1922-1935) and then at Louisiana State University School of Medicine (1935-1943). Kenneth Burdon, MD is recognized as the Founding Chair of the Department of Microbiology Baylor University College of Medicine (1943-1961). He was awarded Professor Emeritus of Microbiology in 1961.

Dr. Burdon’s research and publications feature the following topics: “characterization of a group of aerobic spore-forming bacilli, especially Bacillus anthracis, and on immediate-type hypersensitivity. He also worked on development of an antibiotic to treat tuberculosis. He was a director of an NIH-supported Fellowship Training Program in Allergy and Immunology in conjunction with the Department of Pediatrics from 1958 to 1967. Dr. Burdon authored six editions of a widely used textbook Microbiology, first published in 1939. He also authored a Medical Microbiology textbook.”

Dr. Burdon retired in 1967 and passed away in 1985. Further information and a bibliography of Dr. Burdon’s papers are available in the first folder of this collection.

Citation:"Kenneth L. Burdon, Founding Chair, Microbiology." Baylor College of Medicine. Accessed February 21, 2016. https://www.bcm.edu/departments/molecular-virology-and-microbiology/about-us/history-of-the-department/kenneth-l-burdon.

Kastenbaum, Marvin A., Ph.D.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2013091446
  • Person
  • 1926-2019

Marvin Aaron Kastenbaum was born in New York City on January 16, 1926. During World War II, he served with the 124th Cavalry Regiment and later the 613th Field Artillery Battalion. Kastenbaum was stationed in Burma, and the units he was stationed with participated in the reopening the Burma Road, a vital supply route from Burma to China.

After the war, Kastenbaum returned to his studies and graduated from the City College of New York with a Bachelor of Science degree in mathematics in 1948. He received his Master's degree in statistics from North Carolina State College in 1950 and his PhD from the same institution in 1956.

In January 1953, during a hiatus from his studies, Kastenbaum took a post as statistician in the Biostatistics Department of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission in Hiroshima, Japan. While with ABCC he had occasion to review much of the medical data which had been collected by the commission between 1947 and 1954. He and Dr. William C. Moloney wrote a study of A-bomb radiation on humans. Upon completion of the final report, Marvin A. Kastenbaum decided he would make a career of medical statistics. In September of 1954 he returned to Chapel Hill to complete the requirements for his doctorate in statistics at the University of North Carolina. While there, Dr. Kastenbaum worked as a statistician for the University's Department of Public Health.

Dr. Kastenbaum died September 24, 2019, in Orlando, Florida.

Copeland, Murray M.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2018054171
  • Person
  • 1902-1982

Murray Marcus Copeland was born June 23, 1902, in Georgia, and died April 2, 1982, in Easton, Texas, although he lived in Houston at the time. Copeland was a professor of surgery at UT MD Anderson Cancer Center from 1960 to 1982. He had been chair of Georgetown University’s medical school from 1947 to 1960 and was president of the American Cancer Society from 1964 to 1965. Dr. Copeland graduated from Oglethorpe University in 1923 and earned his MD from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1927. He also trained in surgery at the Mayo Clinic Memorial Hospital for Cancer in New York City. He served in medical corps in the Pacific Theater during World War II and was awarded a Legion of Merit. Copeland has an entry in the Handbook of Texas Online.

University of Houston School of Pharmacy

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2020048313
  • Corporate body
  • 1947-

The University of Houston School of Pharmacy opened in 1947 in the science building of the University of Houston, with physician and pharmacist Allan Collette as acting dean. It became accredited by the American Council of Pharmaceutical Education in 1950. It moved to the Lamar Fleming Building in 1963 and then into a new building in the Texas Medical Center in 1981. Ph.D. programs in pharmacology and pharmaceutics were established in 1987. Between 1977 and ???? the School worked with Baylor College of Medicine and UT Medical School to operate the Houston Pharmacological Center to provide drug information to medical professionals.

Pugh, Martha

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2020062162
  • Person
  • 1939-

Bates, William

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2021014471
  • Person
  • 1889-1974

William B. Bates was born August 16, 1889 in Nat, Texas. He and his siblings attended local schools at Nat and in a place called Red Flat. In 1910, He attended Sam Houston Normal Institute where he earned teaching certificates. After teaching for a few years, he went on to study law at the University of Texas, graduating first in the class in 1915.
Bates served in the United States Army from 1917 to 1919 during World War I. When he returned, he opened a law practice with his brother, Jesse, and married Mary Estill Dorsey. In 1923, he was hired by Fulbright and Crooker, a law firm in Houston. The title "colonel" was bestowed upon W.B. Bates by his friend, former Governor of Texas Dan Moody.
William B. Bates had an enormous impact on the growth and development of Houston, almost from the moment he arrived. He became a member of the Houston Independent School District Board of education in 1925. The University of Houston was established under his chairmanship. William B. Bates also served the Houston Chamber of Commerce for many years. He was on the advisory board of the, then famous, Bank of the Southwest.
In 1939, William B. Bates became chairman of the Board of Trustees of the M.D. Anderson Foundation upon the death of its benefactor, Mr. Anderson. Col. Bates' foresight and leadership contributed to the creation and growth of the Texas Medical Center. W.B. Bates died on April 17, 1974.
For more information about Col. Bates, please refer to N. Don Macon's book South from Flower Mountain: A Conversation with William B. Bates (Houston : Texas Medical Center, 1975)

Hild, Jack R.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no91023037
  • Person
  • 1904-1992

Jack Romulus Hild was born February 27, 1904 in Waco, Texas. He earned his Bachelor’s degree from the University of South California at Los Angeles, and his MD from Tulane University in New Orleans, in 1929, after which he served an internship in pediatrics in Cincinnati, Ohio. He and his wife Dorothy moved to Douglas, Arizona, in 1933 and stayed there until 1939, when he completed his residency. During World War II, Hild achieved the rank of major in the Army Air Force Medical Corps. Two of his three children were injured by polio in the late 1940s and Hild and Dr. O.A. Fly were co-directors of the mass polio vaccinations in Harris County in 1962. He died on August 24, 1992, and is buried at Glenwood Cemetery in Houston.

Harris County Medical Society

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no93003034
  • Corporate body
  • 1903-

Founded in 1903 to improve medical standards and health care in Harris County. Advocated for the creation of the Texas State Board of Medical Examiners in 1907, creating the state’s first standards for training and education of physicians and midwives. Over the years, it has run many public health and awareness campaigns for illnesses such as polio and AIDS, and functioned as a facilitator for emergency response resources in times of crisis. It has also spearheaded the formation of organizations such as the Houston Academy of Medicine, the HAM-TMC Library, the Gulf Coast Blood Center, and the Health Museum, and sponsors the John P. McGovern Compleat Physician Award for physicians whose careers embody the Oslerian ideals of medical excellence, ethics, and humanity.

Wainerdi, Richard E.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no94021624
  • Person
  • 1931-2021

Born November 27, 1931, in New York City. He graduated from the University of Oklahoma with a degree in petroleum engineering. He worked for many years at Texas A&M University and then at Gulf Oil, retiring in 1984 when Gulf Oil was acquired by Chevron. Then he spent 28 years as Chief Executive Officer and Chief Operating Officer of the Texas Medical Center. Dr. Wainerdi died on March 17, 2021.

Murad, Ferid

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no96063323
  • Person
  • 1936-

Ferid Murad was born in Indiana in 1936. He graduated from DePauw University in Greencastle, Indiana in 1958 and went on to complete an MD-PhD program at Western Reserve University in Cleveland and attended Massachusetts General Hospital for his internship and residency. Later, he went on to work with the NIH as a clinical associate in the Heart Institute as well as with the University of Virginia, Stanford, Abbott Laboratories, and the Molecular Geriatrics Corporation. He came to Houston in 1997 to work with the University of Texas.

[Source: “Ferid Murad – Biographical.” Nobelprize.org. Les Prix Nobel, 1998. Web.]

Arnett, Frank C.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no98075898
  • Person
  • 1942-

Frank Couchman Arnett, Jr., was born in Salyersville, Kentucky, in 1942. He earned his M.D. from the University of Cincinnati in 1968 and then pursued internal medicine residency and rheumatology training in the 1970s at The Johns Hopkins University (JHU) School of Medicine, followed by a faculty position at JHU for 10 years.

Dr. Arnett came to the University of Texas Medical School in 1984 to become Professor of Medcine and Director of the Division of Rheumatology, a position he held until he became Chairman of the Department of Internal Medicine in 2001-2004. He served as the chief of various medical services at Memorial Hermann and The Lyndon B. Johnson Hospitals in Houston.

Dr. Arnett is internationally known as a clinician, teacher and clinical investigator. He was elected to the Association of American Physicians in 1993 and the Johns Hopkins Society of Scholars in 1995. He served on the Board of Directors of national Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society for 9 years and was national president of AOA in 1996. He also served on the American Board of Internal Medicine from 1988-1994. In 1997 he became director of the first NIH-NIAMS Specialized Centers of Research in Scleroderma, the longest continually funded SCOR in scleroderma in the nation (1997-2006).

Dr. Arnett was Co-Chairman of the Sjogren's Syndrome Study Group of the American College of Rheumatology in 1990-1991.

In 2006, he led the effort to successfully compete for one of the first 12 Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) funded by NIH/NCRR and formerly served as Principal Investigator and Executive Director of that new program, as well as the first NIH Center of Research Translation (CORT) in Scleroderma.

Dr. Arnett chaired or served on a long list of committees. He has been an invited speaker all over the world. He received numerous awards for his work, including the University of Texas Health Science Center's highest award, the President's Scholar Award for Teaching in 2005 and for Research in 2008.

Dr. Arnett was a founding member of the University of Texas Academy of Health Education Sciences and, in 2007, was elected a Master of the American College of Physicians. He has been named to both Top Doctors and Best Doctors in America since 2000.

Starck, Patricia

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/nr92024521
  • Person

Dean Starck was born in Georgia. She earned a masters’ of nursing from Emory University and a doctorate of nursing in 1979 from the University of Alabama in Birmingham. She is also a graduate of the Institute of Educational Management at Harvard University and a licensed nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist in mental health and psychiatry. She served as dean of the UT Health Science Center from 1984 to 2014 and continues to serve the UTHSCH as Vice President of Interprofessional Education.

Kahn, Eugen

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/nr98011627
  • Person
  • 1887-1973

Dr. Eugen Kahn was born in Stuttgart, Germany, on May 20, 1887. He was educated at Heidelberg, Berlin, and then at Munich, receiving his MD in 1911. He spent the next 18 years in Munich as an assistant and associate on the staff of the Psychiatric Clinic, in close association with Dr. Emil Kraepelin.

In 1930 Dr. Kahn went to Yale University, where he served not only as Sterling Professor of Psychiatry and Mental Hygiene but as Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry until 1946. He also served as Psychiatrist-in-Chief of the New Haven Hospital.

Dr. Kahn then moved to Switzerland, where he remained until 1951. In that year he returned to America, coming to Baylor College of Medicine in Houston Texas to serve on the full-time staff of the Department of Psychiatry as a Professor until 1962; for one of those years he served as Acting Chairman of the Department. After 1962 he was Professor Emeritus at Baylor. During his 22 years in Houston, Dr. Kahn was a research associate in psychiatry at the Houston State Psychiatric Institute (Texas Research Institute of Mental Sciences/ University of Texas Mental Sciences Institute) and a consultant in psychiatry at the Veterans Administration Hospital.

Dr. Kahn's entire career was spent in teaching, research, and scholarly activities. He read and wrote on a broad range of topics. He published at least 120 papers, hundreds of book reviews, and four books, the best know of which is Psychopathic Personalities. The last book, The Past Is Not Past, was published in 1962.

Adapted from American Journal of Psychiatry 130:7, 822, July 1973.

Fred, Herbert L.

  • https://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n88090673.html
  • Person
  • 1929-2018

Herbert Leonard Fred, MD was born June 11, 1929 in Waco, Texas. He was known for his contribution to medical education. He was an award-winning clinician, diagnostician, and professor of internal medicine. Dr. Fred, an emeritus American Osler Society member, centered his medical practice on the patient, championing the use of the mind and five senses to develop medical diagnoses.

In Waco, the Fred family was known for community service, keen athletic team support, and their jewelry store, L. Fred and Son. His father, Isadore (Isie) Fred (1897-1969) received a posthumous City of Waco Commemoration for contributions to the community. Famous for his zest for life and his warm heart, Isie was a friend of many community and national leaders in athletics and film. Dr. Fred’s mother was Helen Louise Marks (1905-1985). He had one sister, Shirley Fred Strauss (1932-2014). Dr. Fred’s paternal grandparents were Louis Fred (died 1940), a Prussian immigrant who became a naturalized citizen of the United States in 1908, and Pauline (Peshi) Fred (1866-1950). Dr. Fred’s maternal grandparents were Samuel Marks (1866-1932) and Fannie Marks (1869-1956). Dr. Fred married Lucille (Lucy) Therese Maule (born 1928) in 1954. They had three children: Stuart Fred (born 1955) and twins Nancy Lynn Fred Sadick and Michael Fred (born 1957). Dr. Fred and Lucy divorced in 1976. Dr. Fred married Judith Ann Edgar Biddington in 1978. She had four children from her first marriage: Lisa Collette Biddington (born 1961), Floyd Wesley Biddington (born 1965), Gregory Leonard Biddington (born 1969), and Stefani Biddington, (birth date unknown).

Dr. Fred spent his boyhood in Waco, Texas, graduating from Waco High School in 1946. He attended then Rice Institute (today Rice University) in Houston, TX, graduating in 1950. He attended medical school at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland from 1950 to 1954. He completed his medical training as an internist with a two year internship and residency at The University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah in 1957. Dr. Fred served as a Captain in the United States Air Force Medical Corps from 1957-1959, acting as Chief of Medicine at the Amarillo Air Force Base Hospital in Amarillo, Texas. He then returned to Salt Lake City first as Chief Resident, Department of Internal Medicine, at the Salt Lake City General Hospital and then as an Instructor in Medicine at the University of Utah College of Medicine from 1959 to 1961. In 1962, Dr. Fred and his young family moved to Houston, Texas where Dr. Fred accepted an appointment as Instructor in Medicine at Baylor University College of Medicine.

Dr. Fred worked at institutions in Houston, Texas for the remainder of his career. After holding a number of academic positions at Baylor from 1962 to 1969, Dr. Fred left Baylor to accept a position as Director of Medical Education at St. Joseph Hospital in 1969 where he continued until 1988. In addition, he accepted positions as Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine at the University Of Texas Graduate School Of Biomedical Sciences in 1968 and as Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, at The University of Texas Health Science Center in 1971, retaining both appointments today. From 1979 to 2002, Dr. Fred served as Adjunct Professor, Human Performance and Health Sciences, at his alma mater, Rice University. From 1988 to 1993, Dr. Fred held a position as the Educational Coordinator at the HCA Center for Health Excellence. Beginning in 1982, Dr. Fred served as a medical expert witness in a number of medical malpractice trials. Records pertaining to these trials from 1988 to 2011 are located in the Legal Series. These folders are restricted due to the use of patient names until 2050. Dr. Fred is a member of thirteen medical societies including the American Medical Joggers Association, American College of Physicians, American College of Chest Physicians, American College of Sports Medicine, American Medical Writers Association, and American Osler Society.

Dr. Fred received numerous awards for teaching excellence from students and peers. Highlights include: Outstanding Full-Time Clinical Faculty Member at Baylor University College of Medicine in 1964 and 1967; a citation from President Ronald Reagan in October 4, 1988 for 27 years as a medical educator; The Benjy F. Brooks, M.D. Outstanding Clinical Faculty Award from the Alumni Association of the University of Texas Medical School in Houston in 1999; honoree of The Herb Fred Medical Society, Inc., a corporation established in 2002 by former students; The American College of Physicians – American Society of Internal Medicine Distinguished Teacher Award along with election to Mastership in The American College of Physicians in 2004; the TIAA-CREF Distinguished Medical Educator Award in 2005; and The American College of Physicians Laureate Award in 2012.

Dr. Fred’s running and medical practices intersected. Some of his scholarly articles include clinical descriptions of long distance running effects on the human body and promote running as preventive medicine. He often combined participation in running events with visiting professorships and Grand Rounds at other medical institutions. Dr. Fred began his competitive running career by running marathons but later switched to ultra-marathons, 100 mile races lasting 24-26 hours. Dr. Fred holds 3 National Age Records. By 2011, Dr. Fred had run a total of 244,950 miles.

Dr. Fred’s writing career arose from his medical practice and running competition. A tenacious advocate of clarity and precision in medical discourse both in his teaching and as an author, Dr. Fred determined to improve the accuracy of medical communication, written and spoken. Dr. Fred wrote over 450 scholarly medical articles. He served as editor-in-chief of the Houston Medical Journal from 1984 to 1988 and Houston Medicine from 1988 to1993. Other editorial responsibilities included positions with Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise from 1979 to 1986, Annals of Sports Medicine from 1982 to 1985, Circulation from 1995 to 2004, Resident and Staff Physician from 2003 to 2008, and Texas Heart Institute Journal from 2011to the present. Dr. Fred served as a peer reviewer for Southern Medical Journal, Chest, Journal of the American Medical Association, and Circulation. He was a correspondent for Ultrarunning magazine from 1981 to 1986. Dr. Fred authored several books in his career, including "Elephant Medicine and More", "Say Aah, Medical Writing: A Practical Guide", "Looking Back (and Forth): Reflections Of An Old-Fashioned Doctor", "Images of Memorable Cases: 50 Years At The Bedside", and "The Best of Herb Fred, MD".

Dr. Fred served on the Board of Trustees for the Houston Congregation for Reform Judaism from 1995 to 2004, acting as President of the Board from 1996 to 1998. Additionally, he joined the Board of Directors for the Friends of the Texas Medical Center Library in 2007, acting as Secretary from January 2011 to the present.

Dr. Fred continued to practice medicine and ran 11 miles a day on his treadmill until 2016. He retired in 2016. Dr. Fred died on December 30, 2018 and is buried in Agudath Jacob Cemetery in Waco.

Johnson, Herman Walter

  • https://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2018075774.html
  • Person
  • 1883-1958

Herman Walter Johnson, MD (1883-1958) was born in Andover, Vermont on August 2, 1883. He graduated from the University of Buffalo Medical School in 1905 and, after years of working as a male midwife in New York and Texas, was appointed Professor and Chairman of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Baylor College of Medicine. He served in World War I as a major in the United States Army Medical Corps. He held memberships and fellowships at the State Board of Medical Examiners for the State of Texas, the Academy International of Medicine, the Texas Association of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and the Houston Surgical Society. He published his autobiography, titled Reminiscences of a Male Midwife, in 1954. Herman Walter Johnson, MD died on November 14, 1958. This information was taken from the Texas Medical History E-book 4 available through the Texas Medical History Documents link on the DigitalCommons@The Texas Medical Center web page and materials within the Johnson collection.

Renfert, Henry

  • Person
  • 1920-2003

Dr. Henry Renfert, Jr. was born May 5, 1920 in Fort Worth, Texas, to German immigrant Heinrich Renfert and his wife, Wisconsin native Wanda Stresau. He had an older brother and sister, Frederic and Wandy, and a twin sister, Melita. His childhood was spent mostly in Galveston but his parents sent him to Wisconsin to attend high school at the Milwaukee Country Day School (1934-1937). He graduated from Cornell University in 1941. He earned his M.D. from Cornell University Medical College in 1944 and interned at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.

He served as medical officer in 1944-1945 aboard the U.S.S Hydrus and U.S.S. Independence; during this time, the Independence was assigned to atomic bomb experiments on Bikini Atoll. He completed his residency training in internal medicine at the University of Michigan before returning to the Navy to serve as Senior Medical Officer at the U.S. Navy Infirmary in Sasabo, Japan. He was awarded both a Naval commendation medal for the success of his program to control communicable diseases at the Sasabo base, and a Navy Reserve medal for ten years of service to the Navy.

Upon returning the United States, he spent a year as an assistant professor at Ann Arbor and then returned to his home state to go into private practice in Austin. He was joined by Dr. Virgil Lawless in 1956 and went on to found the Austin Diagnostic Clinic; their dream was to build a smaller form of the Mayo Clinic in Central Texas. In 1958, Dr. Renfert returned to Cornell as Associate Dean and Assistant Professor of Medicine, staying two years before returning to Austin to rejoin the Austin Diagnostic Clinic. The Austin Diagnostic Clinic was the first clinic in Austin to provide in-house radiology and laboratory testing, as well as the first to supply its own specialists in many different fields. It eventually grew into the Austin Diagnostic Medical Center, with a hospital and over 130 doctors. Today, it is called the Austin Medical Center and has several branches.

Dr. Renfert died in Austin on January 5, 2003. He was cremated and his ashes scattered in Hitchcock, north of Galveston.

Dr. Renfert was also an avid collector of railroad china and donated his collection, thought to be the largest in the United States, to the Gulf Coast Railroad Museum in Galveston in 1991.

Bickel, Laura C.

  • Person
  • 1912-1977

Laural Carnell Bickel was born in Shamokin, Pennsylvania, on June 2, 1912. She was educated at University of Wisconsin Medical School, (now the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health) and moved to Houston in the early 1940s. She was a pediatrician and did considerable work in both rubella and in congenital diseases. Dr. Bickel died in Houston on December 15, 1977.

Kit, Saul

  • Person
  • 1920-2008

Dr. Saul Kit (November 25, 1920 - January 24, 2008) was a leader in biochemistry in the Texas Medical Center. He was chief of the section of nucleoprotein metabolism in the Department of Biochemistry at M.D. Anderson Hospital, and later Head of the Division of Biochemical Virology at Baylor College of Medicine. He served as President of the Southwest Section of the American Association for Cancer Researchers, the Treasurer of the American Society for Cell Biology, and President of the American Society for Cell Biology. Dr. Kit was a recipient of numerous research grants from National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, The American Cancer Society, Leukemia Society, Robert A. Welch Foundation, and the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis. For over 25 years he received a Research Career Award from the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. In 1987, he was honored with the Distinguished Inventor of the Year Award for developing the world's first genetically engineered vaccine to be licensed by the U.S. government. Dr. Kit was granted numerous United States and International patents for his pioneering vaccine inventions.

Barkley, Howard T.

  • Person
  • 1901-1981

Howard T. Barkley, Sr. was born in Tucson, AZ on November 30, 1901. He graduated from the University of Arizona in 1931 with his Bachelor's degree and the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons with a MD in 1935. He first served as an intern at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York before going to the Presbyterian Hospital, also of New York, to serve as a surgical resident. He received further training at the University of Michigan Hospital in Ann Arbor before moving permanetnly to Houston, TX in 1941.

During World War II he served as a flight surgeon for the United States Army Air Corps, reaching the rank of lieutenant colonel. He was an associate of professor of clinical surgery at Baylor College of Medicine from 1943-1980 and chief of thoracic surgery at MD Anderson Hospital from 1944-1968. Barkley also served on the staff of Hermann Hospital in Houston from 1942 to 1972, and as chief of thoracic surgery there from 1944-1968. In 1948 he was appointed chairman of the medical staff at Houston AntiTubercular Clinic. Barkley served in a variety of capacities for different regional medical organizations. Barkley served as president of the Houston Surgical Society in 1952, the Texas Tuberculosis Association from 1956-1958, the Harris County Medical Society in 1967, and the Houston chapter of the American Tuberculosis Association. He served as vice president of the National Tuberculosis Association in 1963-1964. He was a founding member of the American Association of Thoracic Surgery in 1948 and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons in 1964.

Howard T. Barkley died on January 26, 1981.

Doak, Edmund K.

  • Person
  • 1909-2000

Edmond King Doak, (Jr.?) was born October 3, 1909, in Taylor, Texas, and died 29 November 2000 in Houston. His father was Edmond King Doak, Sr., MD, born August 9, 1878, in Lexington, Texas, and died December 20, 1971 in Taylor, Texas. Doak, Sr., was among the doctors who built a new hospital in Taylor in 1920.
Doak, Jr., graduated from the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1934 and was on the faculty at Baylor College of Medicine. He had an office in the Hermann Professional Building in 1974. Member of the American Diabetes Association; was on the Council 1959-1960.
He has (two?) entries in the Gazetteer of Texas Physicians and his papers are MS 049 at the Texas Medical Center archives. His portrait is N-1003.

Yoffe, Boris

  • Person
  • 1949-

Boris M. Yoffe was born August 24, 1949. He earned an MD in 1974 from the Institute of Technology in Haifa, Israel. He has taught gastroenterology at Baylor since 1983.

Seybold, William Dempsey

  • Person
  • 1915-2004

Dr. William Dempsey Seybold was born in Temple, Texas on February 23, 1915, the oldest son of Claude Dempsey and Lillian Cochrane Seybold. He attended high school in Temple and received his B.S. in medicine from the University of Texas at Austin in 1936.
In 1938, he received his M.D. from the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston and stayed on as an instructor of anatomy until 1940. While an instructor, Dr. Seybold made a discovery that had previously gone unnoticed in the study of gross anatomy. He noted small ligaments that hold the spinal cord in place and published his first paper on the subject in 1940 in Anatomical Record entitled, "A note on the occurrence of transverse fibrous bands in the spinal dural sac of man." Dr. Seybold left his teaching appointment at the UT Medical Branch to do his internship at Barnes Hospital in St. Louis, Missouri, which he completed in 1941.
On May 3, 1941, Dr. Seybold married Frances Randolph Rather of Austin, and together they moved to Rochester, Minnesota, where he began his residency in surgery at the Mayo Clinic. Their first son, William Rather Seybold was born in Rochester in April, 1942. Between 1944 and 1946 he served as Lt. JG. with the United States Naval Reserve Medical Corps. During that time their second son, Randolph Cochrane Seybold, was born in December, 1944. The Seybold family returned to Rochester where Dr. Seybold completed his training in both general and thoracic surgery in 1947. He was appointed to the Mayo Clinic staff in 1948.
While at the Mayo Clinic, Dr. Seybold dedicated much of his time to the surgical treatment of tuberculosis and became a close friend and colleague of Dr. O. T. "Jim" Clagett, with whom he published several articles, including "Resection in pulmonary tuberculosis" and "The use of gelatin foam in thoracopiasties." Dr. Seybold also served as a visiting thoracic surgeon at the Nopeming Sanatorium near Duluth, Minnesota, a sanatorium regularly staffed with Mayo physicians.
The Seybold's third child, a daughter, Frances Rather Seybold, was born in Rochester in October, 1949.
Dr. Seybold resigned from the Mayo Clinic on October 1, 1950, to return to his native Texas, where he joined the practice of another Mayo alumnus, Dr. Mavis P. Kelsey. A third Mayo-trained physician, Dr. William V. Leary, also became a partner. Two years later, however, Dr. Seybold withdrew from the partnership and established himself in an office in the Hermann Professional Building. In the summer of 1954, Dr. John W. Overstreet joined Dr. Seybold, forming a partnership that lasted until 1961, when Dr. Seybold rejoined what was then called the Kelsey-Leary Clinic. Dr. Seybold remained a partner in the subsequent Kelsey-Seybold Clinic, became Chief of the Surgery Section and later Chief of Staff, Chairman of the Professional Committee, and member of the Executive Committee.
Dr. Seybold also was the Chief of Surgery of St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital (a position he held from 1956), and Chief of Staff of St. Luke's from 1967-1970. He was on the active staff of both Methodist and Hermann Hospitals as well.
The teaching appointments he held were as Clinical Professor of Surgery with Baylor College of Medicine; Clinical Associate in the Program of Surgery, University of Texas Medical School in Houston; and Consultant in Surgery, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute, among others.
In addition to his administrative and teaching responsibilities, Dr. Seybold was an active member in many professional associations and organizations, including: Alpha Omega Alpha, AMA, Fellowship in the American College of Surgeons (member of the Board of Governors), Fellowship in the American College of Chest Physicians, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, Mayo Alumni Association (liaison for Mayo with Baylor College of Medicine and Ad Hoc Committee member), Western Surgical Society (member of programs committee), Texas Medical Association (Chairman of the Section on Surgery, Chairman of the Nursing and Patient Services Committees), Texas Surgical Society (president in 1971), Harris County Medical Society, Houston Surgical Society and Sigma XI. He was a member of the Advisory Board and the Credentials Committee of the American Association of Medical Clinics, member of the Board of Trustees of the Kelsey-teary Foundation, member of the Chancellor's Council of the University of Texas System and member of the Advisory Board to the President of the University of Texas Medical Branch. He received a citation of merit from the UT Medical Branch in 1970.
Dr. Seybold participated in several civic organizations, devoting much of his time to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Houston Area Chapter where he held positions as chairman of the chapter, secretary, board member, and on numerous committees. He served as Vice President of the Southwestern Region and on several committees at the national level as well. He had worked diligently for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society since 1959 and received a citation of merit from the Society in 1969.
He served as President and Board member of the Texas Division of the American Cancer Society, and was on the Board of Directors and Executive Committee of the Harris County Unit for many years. He received a citation of merit from the American Cancer Society in 1961. Dr. Seybold was also an active member of the Friends of the Texas Medical Center Library, Friends of the Houston Public Library and the Texas State Historical Association, and served as a member of the Vestry of St. John the Divine Episcopal Church in Houston.
To his credentials are added the publication of 52 medical papers, innumerable presentations and lectures, and 5 books on which he collaborated.
Dr. and Mrs. Seybold's daughter died of bacterial endocarditis in November, 1968 at the age of 19. His wife, Frances, died in January, 1977 after living with multiple sclerosis for many years. Their two sons both became physicians. Dr. Seybold died July 8, 2004, and willed his body to the University of Texas Southwest Medical Center in Dallas.

Andrews, Tom A.

  • Person
  • 1903-1977

Urologist Tom Adam Andrews. Jr., was born November 26, 1903 in West Point (near La Grange), Fayette County, Texas to Tom A., Sr., and Augusta “Gussie” Rabb Andrews.. He married Helen sometime before 1930 and served in the Navy Medical Corps during World War II. He died on October 16, 1977, in Houston and is buried at Forest Park Cemetery. Note: He is listed in various places online as “Jr.” but at least one source gives his father’s middle name as Adolphus, not Adam. His older son was also Thomas Adam (1930-1991).

Rodgers, L. Rodney

  • Person
  • 1920-2012

Lawrence Rodney Rogers, MD, was born March 9, 1920 in Clovis, New Mexico, to a cowboy and a schoolteacher, and died December 13, 2012, in Houston. He grew up in Amarillo, Texas. He was elected to the Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor Society during his junior year at the University of Texas Medical Branch. He volunteered for the US Army during World War II and served as a battalion surgeon in the 42nd Rainbow Division in the European Theater, including the Battle of the Bulge, for which he earned three Bronze Stars and four Battle Stars. Accounts of his treatment of prisoners at Dachau and Jewish patients in occupied Austria are on video at the Houston Holocaust Museum.
Dr. Rodgers specialized in internal medicine at Philadelphia General Hospital for three years before returning to Texas to practice in Houston from 1949 to 1994. He was chair of the Department of Internal Medicine at Hermann Hospital in 1965 and was active in the effort to establish the University of Texas Medical School at Hermann in 1966-1967 and served the school both as a professor and member of many committees.
Dr. Rodgers served the Harris County Medical Society as TMA delegate, on the executive board, and for a year as vice president, and was for a time editor of the Harris County Physician. He served as President of the Houston Society of Internal Medicine in 1974, of the Houston Academy of Medicine in 1981, of the Doctors’ Club in 1986, and the Houston Philosophical Society in 1994, and supported and participated in many more organizations. He was awarded the Ashbel Smith Distinguished Alumni Award by UTMB, and the American College of Physicians awarded him both a Laureate Internist Award for Texas and Mastership of the College.

Schnur, Sidney

  • Person
  • 1910-1997

Sidney A. Schnur (June 23, 1910 – April 8, 1997) was born in Manhattan, New York and earned his MD from New York University in 1935. He was a physician and a clinical assistant professor at Baylor College of Medicine. One of Schnur’s patients at St. Joseph’s Hospital, near death from cardiogenic shock (when the heart cannot pump enough blood to meet the body’s needs) after a heart attack, was the test for Denton Cooley’s heart-lung machine in April 1956; the patient lived another six weeks before succumbing to a second heart attack.
Schnur served as president of the Harris County Medical Society in 1972.

Kelsey, John

  • Person
  • 1922-2010

John Roger Kelsey was born in May 1922 in Deport, Texas. He graduated from Baylor College of Medicine and later became a fellow in internal medicine and gastroenterology at Mayo Clinic. While in Minnesota, he earned his Master of Science degree from the University of Minnesota. He served as clinical professor of medicine at Baylor College of Medicine and as chief of the gastroenterology department at Methodist Hospital. Dr. Kelsey, along with Dr. William Seybold and Dr. William Kelsey developed Houston’s Kelsey-Seybold Clinics.
Citation: CHRONICLE, CINDY HORSWELL HOUSTON. "John Kelsey, Founder of Clinic Bearing His Name, Dies." Houston Chronicle. N.p., 24 July 2010. Web.

Levine, Jack H.

  • Person
  • 1923-2009

Jack H. Levine was born in 1923 in Waco, Texas. He practiced dentistry for thirty-five years and taught at U.T. Dental School for fifteen years.

Autrey, A. M., Jr.

  • Person
  • 1899-1983

Adam Manuel Autrey, Jr., was born October 31, 1899 and died June 17, 1983; he is buried in Forest Park Cemetery in Houston.

Autrey, A.M., Sr.

  • Person
  • 1863-1935

Dr. A.M. Autrey, Sr., was an eye, ear, nose, and throat specialist. He was born October 4, 1863, in Veracruz, Mexico. He died December 28, 1935, in Houston and is buried at Forest Park Cemetery.

Knowles, W. Roy

  • Person
  • 1929-2005

William Roy Knowles was born in Gilmer, Texas, on December 13, 1929 and died in Houston on September 3, 2005. He is buried at Memorial Oaks Cemetery. He trained as a dermatologist at Baylor College of Medicine starting in 1965. The announcement of the establishment of his office in Houston in 1968 notes that he was one of two dermatologists in Texas at the time capable of performing “chemosurgery” to remove skin cancers. He seems to have had an ongoing interest in Civil War medicine; local papers note that he sometimes gave talks on the subject. His brother Royce was also in medical practice in Palestine.

McCorkle, Robert G.

  • Person
  • 1923-1979

Robert George McCorkle, Jr., was born in San Antonio, Texas, on September 18, 1923, and died January 24, 1979. His father, Robert G. McCorkle, Sr., (March 16, 1892 – March 20 1954) was also a doctor.

Barkley, James E.

  • Person
  • 1925-2014

James Earl Barkley, Jr., was born January 21, 1925, in Uhrichsville, Ohio. He served in Europe and Asia during World War II and was assigned for awhile to the pharmacy at Camp Cooke in Los Angeles, California. He obtained a pharmacy degree from Ohio State University in 1951 and began working for Burroughs Wellcome. He was transferred to Houston in 1961. Barkley spent five years in Washington, DC, between 1962 and 1967, but then returned to Houston. He died on March 20, 2014 and is buried at Forest Park Westheimer Cemetery.
Henry Solomon Wellcome was born August 21, 1853, in a log cabin near what would later become Almond, Wisconsin. He and Silas Mainville Burroughs formed Burroughs, Wellcome, & Co. in 1880. In 1884, they introduced to England the idea of selling medications in tablet form instead of the usual powders or liquids. They also pioneered direct marketing to doctors. Burroughs died in 1895 but the company did well under Wellcome’s direction. Wellcome became a British subject in 1910. Wellcome’s enterprises had been consolidated into the Wellcome Foundation, Ltd., in 1924 and, upon his death on July 25, 1936, this formed the foundation for the Wellcome Trust, which remains one of the world’s largest private biomedical charities.

Sobocinski, Robert

  • Person
  • 1928-2009

Robert Stanley Sobocinski was born April 6, 1928 in North Tonawanda, New York. He earned his MD from the University of Buffalo Medical School and served as medical officer in the US Navy between 1952 and 1955, aboard the USS Siboney. He was a family physician in Houston for many years. He died August 4, 2009, and is buried at Forest Park East in Webster

Moore, John T.

  • Person
  • 1864-1951

John T. Moore, MD, was the first man in the United States “to use radium as part of an operation in the treatment of cancer, he was one of the pioneers in clinical research,” according to an obituary that appeared in the Houston Post, section 1, page 6 on March 20, 1951. Dr. Moore was born in Moore’s Grove. He attended Sam Houston Normal Institute. He was educator before studying medicine. He was superintendent of schools in Trinity, Texas and then Orange, Texas. Dr. Moore received his master’s degree from Texas Christian University and his medical degree from the University of Texas School of Medicine at Galveston. He did graduate work at Johns Hopkins University and the University of Vienna. He was a former president of the Harris County Medical Society. He was a member of the Texas Surgical Society and other medical organizations. Dr. Moore was one of the organizers of the Texas State Medical Society.

Dr. Moore was born September 4, 1864 and died March 1, 1951.

Watts, Elie M., III

  • Person
  • 1940-2012

Elie Moores Watts III, born January 6, 1940, in Bowie, Texas died October 17, 2012, in Texarkana. He went to East Texas State University (now Texas A&M University - Commerce) in Commerce. He lived in New Boston, Texas, and is buried there at Read Hill Cemetery.

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