Showing 1872 results

Authority record

Renfert, Henry

  • Person
  • 1920-2003

Dr. Henry Renfert, Jr. was born May 5, 1920 in Fort Worth, Texas, to German immigrant Heinrich Renfert and his wife, Wisconsin native Wanda Stresau. He had an older brother and sister, Frederic and Wandy, and a twin sister, Melita. His childhood was spent mostly in Galveston but his parents sent him to Wisconsin to attend high school at the Milwaukee Country Day School (1934-1937). He graduated from Cornell University in 1941. He earned his M.D. from Cornell University Medical College in 1944 and interned at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.

He served as medical officer in 1944-1945 aboard the U.S.S Hydrus and U.S.S. Independence; during this time, the Independence was assigned to atomic bomb experiments on Bikini Atoll. He completed his residency training in internal medicine at the University of Michigan before returning to the Navy to serve as Senior Medical Officer at the U.S. Navy Infirmary in Sasabo, Japan. He was awarded both a Naval commendation medal for the success of his program to control communicable diseases at the Sasabo base, and a Navy Reserve medal for ten years of service to the Navy.

Upon returning the United States, he spent a year as an assistant professor at Ann Arbor and then returned to his home state to go into private practice in Austin. He was joined by Dr. Virgil Lawless in 1956 and went on to found the Austin Diagnostic Clinic; their dream was to build a smaller form of the Mayo Clinic in Central Texas. In 1958, Dr. Renfert returned to Cornell as Associate Dean and Assistant Professor of Medicine, staying two years before returning to Austin to rejoin the Austin Diagnostic Clinic. The Austin Diagnostic Clinic was the first clinic in Austin to provide in-house radiology and laboratory testing, as well as the first to supply its own specialists in many different fields. It eventually grew into the Austin Diagnostic Medical Center, with a hospital and over 130 doctors. Today, it is called the Austin Medical Center and has several branches.

Dr. Renfert died in Austin on January 5, 2003. He was cremated and his ashes scattered in Hitchcock, north of Galveston.

Dr. Renfert was also an avid collector of railroad china and donated his collection, thought to be the largest in the United States, to the Gulf Coast Railroad Museum in Galveston in 1991.

Bickel, Laura C.

  • Person
  • 1912-1977

Laural Carnell Bickel was born in Shamokin, Pennsylvania, on June 2, 1912. She was educated at University of Wisconsin Medical School, (now the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health) and moved to Houston in the early 1940s. She was a pediatrician and did considerable work in both rubella and in congenital diseases. Dr. Bickel died in Houston on December 15, 1977.

Kit, Saul

  • Person
  • 1920-2008

Dr. Saul Kit (November 25, 1920 - January 24, 2008) was a leader in biochemistry in the Texas Medical Center. He was chief of the section of nucleoprotein metabolism in the Department of Biochemistry at M.D. Anderson Hospital, and later Head of the Division of Biochemical Virology at Baylor College of Medicine. He served as President of the Southwest Section of the American Association for Cancer Researchers, the Treasurer of the American Society for Cell Biology, and President of the American Society for Cell Biology. Dr. Kit was a recipient of numerous research grants from National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, The American Cancer Society, Leukemia Society, Robert A. Welch Foundation, and the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis. For over 25 years he received a Research Career Award from the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. In 1987, he was honored with the Distinguished Inventor of the Year Award for developing the world's first genetically engineered vaccine to be licensed by the U.S. government. Dr. Kit was granted numerous United States and International patents for his pioneering vaccine inventions.

Barkley, Howard T.

  • Person
  • 1901-1981

Howard T. Barkley, Sr. was born in Tucson, AZ on November 30, 1901. He graduated from the University of Arizona in 1931 with his Bachelor's degree and the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons with a MD in 1935. He first served as an intern at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York before going to the Presbyterian Hospital, also of New York, to serve as a surgical resident. He received further training at the University of Michigan Hospital in Ann Arbor before moving permanetnly to Houston, TX in 1941.

During World War II he served as a flight surgeon for the United States Army Air Corps, reaching the rank of lieutenant colonel. He was an associate of professor of clinical surgery at Baylor College of Medicine from 1943-1980 and chief of thoracic surgery at MD Anderson Hospital from 1944-1968. Barkley also served on the staff of Hermann Hospital in Houston from 1942 to 1972, and as chief of thoracic surgery there from 1944-1968. In 1948 he was appointed chairman of the medical staff at Houston AntiTubercular Clinic. Barkley served in a variety of capacities for different regional medical organizations. Barkley served as president of the Houston Surgical Society in 1952, the Texas Tuberculosis Association from 1956-1958, the Harris County Medical Society in 1967, and the Houston chapter of the American Tuberculosis Association. He served as vice president of the National Tuberculosis Association in 1963-1964. He was a founding member of the American Association of Thoracic Surgery in 1948 and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons in 1964.

Howard T. Barkley died on January 26, 1981.

Doak, Edmund K.

  • Person
  • 1909-2000

Edmond King Doak, (Jr.?) was born October 3, 1909, in Taylor, Texas, and died 29 November 2000 in Houston. His father was Edmond King Doak, Sr., MD, born August 9, 1878, in Lexington, Texas, and died December 20, 1971 in Taylor, Texas. Doak, Sr., was among the doctors who built a new hospital in Taylor in 1920.
Doak, Jr., graduated from the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1934 and was on the faculty at Baylor College of Medicine. He had an office in the Hermann Professional Building in 1974. Member of the American Diabetes Association; was on the Council 1959-1960.
He has (two?) entries in the Gazetteer of Texas Physicians and his papers are MS 049 at the Texas Medical Center archives. His portrait is N-1003.

Yoffe, Boris

  • Person
  • 1949-

Boris M. Yoffe was born August 24, 1949. He earned an MD in 1974 from the Institute of Technology in Haifa, Israel. He has taught gastroenterology at Baylor since 1983.

Seybold, William Dempsey

  • Person
  • 1915-2004

Dr. William Dempsey Seybold was born in Temple, Texas on February 23, 1915, the oldest son of Claude Dempsey and Lillian Cochrane Seybold. He attended high school in Temple and received his B.S. in medicine from the University of Texas at Austin in 1936.
In 1938, he received his M.D. from the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston and stayed on as an instructor of anatomy until 1940. While an instructor, Dr. Seybold made a discovery that had previously gone unnoticed in the study of gross anatomy. He noted small ligaments that hold the spinal cord in place and published his first paper on the subject in 1940 in Anatomical Record entitled, "A note on the occurrence of transverse fibrous bands in the spinal dural sac of man." Dr. Seybold left his teaching appointment at the UT Medical Branch to do his internship at Barnes Hospital in St. Louis, Missouri, which he completed in 1941.
On May 3, 1941, Dr. Seybold married Frances Randolph Rather of Austin, and together they moved to Rochester, Minnesota, where he began his residency in surgery at the Mayo Clinic. Their first son, William Rather Seybold was born in Rochester in April, 1942. Between 1944 and 1946 he served as Lt. JG. with the United States Naval Reserve Medical Corps. During that time their second son, Randolph Cochrane Seybold, was born in December, 1944. The Seybold family returned to Rochester where Dr. Seybold completed his training in both general and thoracic surgery in 1947. He was appointed to the Mayo Clinic staff in 1948.
While at the Mayo Clinic, Dr. Seybold dedicated much of his time to the surgical treatment of tuberculosis and became a close friend and colleague of Dr. O. T. "Jim" Clagett, with whom he published several articles, including "Resection in pulmonary tuberculosis" and "The use of gelatin foam in thoracopiasties." Dr. Seybold also served as a visiting thoracic surgeon at the Nopeming Sanatorium near Duluth, Minnesota, a sanatorium regularly staffed with Mayo physicians.
The Seybold's third child, a daughter, Frances Rather Seybold, was born in Rochester in October, 1949.
Dr. Seybold resigned from the Mayo Clinic on October 1, 1950, to return to his native Texas, where he joined the practice of another Mayo alumnus, Dr. Mavis P. Kelsey. A third Mayo-trained physician, Dr. William V. Leary, also became a partner. Two years later, however, Dr. Seybold withdrew from the partnership and established himself in an office in the Hermann Professional Building. In the summer of 1954, Dr. John W. Overstreet joined Dr. Seybold, forming a partnership that lasted until 1961, when Dr. Seybold rejoined what was then called the Kelsey-Leary Clinic. Dr. Seybold remained a partner in the subsequent Kelsey-Seybold Clinic, became Chief of the Surgery Section and later Chief of Staff, Chairman of the Professional Committee, and member of the Executive Committee.
Dr. Seybold also was the Chief of Surgery of St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital (a position he held from 1956), and Chief of Staff of St. Luke's from 1967-1970. He was on the active staff of both Methodist and Hermann Hospitals as well.
The teaching appointments he held were as Clinical Professor of Surgery with Baylor College of Medicine; Clinical Associate in the Program of Surgery, University of Texas Medical School in Houston; and Consultant in Surgery, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute, among others.
In addition to his administrative and teaching responsibilities, Dr. Seybold was an active member in many professional associations and organizations, including: Alpha Omega Alpha, AMA, Fellowship in the American College of Surgeons (member of the Board of Governors), Fellowship in the American College of Chest Physicians, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, Mayo Alumni Association (liaison for Mayo with Baylor College of Medicine and Ad Hoc Committee member), Western Surgical Society (member of programs committee), Texas Medical Association (Chairman of the Section on Surgery, Chairman of the Nursing and Patient Services Committees), Texas Surgical Society (president in 1971), Harris County Medical Society, Houston Surgical Society and Sigma XI. He was a member of the Advisory Board and the Credentials Committee of the American Association of Medical Clinics, member of the Board of Trustees of the Kelsey-teary Foundation, member of the Chancellor's Council of the University of Texas System and member of the Advisory Board to the President of the University of Texas Medical Branch. He received a citation of merit from the UT Medical Branch in 1970.
Dr. Seybold participated in several civic organizations, devoting much of his time to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Houston Area Chapter where he held positions as chairman of the chapter, secretary, board member, and on numerous committees. He served as Vice President of the Southwestern Region and on several committees at the national level as well. He had worked diligently for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society since 1959 and received a citation of merit from the Society in 1969.
He served as President and Board member of the Texas Division of the American Cancer Society, and was on the Board of Directors and Executive Committee of the Harris County Unit for many years. He received a citation of merit from the American Cancer Society in 1961. Dr. Seybold was also an active member of the Friends of the Texas Medical Center Library, Friends of the Houston Public Library and the Texas State Historical Association, and served as a member of the Vestry of St. John the Divine Episcopal Church in Houston.
To his credentials are added the publication of 52 medical papers, innumerable presentations and lectures, and 5 books on which he collaborated.
Dr. and Mrs. Seybold's daughter died of bacterial endocarditis in November, 1968 at the age of 19. His wife, Frances, died in January, 1977 after living with multiple sclerosis for many years. Their two sons both became physicians. Dr. Seybold died July 8, 2004, and willed his body to the University of Texas Southwest Medical Center in Dallas.

Andrews, Tom A.

  • Person
  • 1903-1977

Urologist Tom Adam Andrews. Jr., was born November 26, 1903 in West Point (near La Grange), Fayette County, Texas to Tom A., Sr., and Augusta “Gussie” Rabb Andrews.. He married Helen sometime before 1930 and served in the Navy Medical Corps during World War II. He died on October 16, 1977, in Houston and is buried at Forest Park Cemetery. Note: He is listed in various places online as “Jr.” but at least one source gives his father’s middle name as Adolphus, not Adam. His older son was also Thomas Adam (1930-1991).

Rodgers, L. Rodney

  • Person
  • 1920-2012

Lawrence Rodney Rogers, MD, was born March 9, 1920 in Clovis, New Mexico, to a cowboy and a schoolteacher, and died December 13, 2012, in Houston. He grew up in Amarillo, Texas. He was elected to the Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor Society during his junior year at the University of Texas Medical Branch. He volunteered for the US Army during World War II and served as a battalion surgeon in the 42nd Rainbow Division in the European Theater, including the Battle of the Bulge, for which he earned three Bronze Stars and four Battle Stars. Accounts of his treatment of prisoners at Dachau and Jewish patients in occupied Austria are on video at the Houston Holocaust Museum.
Dr. Rodgers specialized in internal medicine at Philadelphia General Hospital for three years before returning to Texas to practice in Houston from 1949 to 1994. He was chair of the Department of Internal Medicine at Hermann Hospital in 1965 and was active in the effort to establish the University of Texas Medical School at Hermann in 1966-1967 and served the school both as a professor and member of many committees.
Dr. Rodgers served the Harris County Medical Society as TMA delegate, on the executive board, and for a year as vice president, and was for a time editor of the Harris County Physician. He served as President of the Houston Society of Internal Medicine in 1974, of the Houston Academy of Medicine in 1981, of the Doctors’ Club in 1986, and the Houston Philosophical Society in 1994, and supported and participated in many more organizations. He was awarded the Ashbel Smith Distinguished Alumni Award by UTMB, and the American College of Physicians awarded him both a Laureate Internist Award for Texas and Mastership of the College.

Schnur, Sidney

  • Person
  • 1910-1997

Sidney A. Schnur (June 23, 1910 – April 8, 1997) was born in Manhattan, New York and earned his MD from New York University in 1935. He was a physician and a clinical assistant professor at Baylor College of Medicine. One of Schnur’s patients at St. Joseph’s Hospital, near death from cardiogenic shock (when the heart cannot pump enough blood to meet the body’s needs) after a heart attack, was the test for Denton Cooley’s heart-lung machine in April 1956; the patient lived another six weeks before succumbing to a second heart attack.
Schnur served as president of the Harris County Medical Society in 1972.

Kelsey, John

  • Person
  • 1922-2010

John Roger Kelsey was born in May 1922 in Deport, Texas. He graduated from Baylor College of Medicine and later became a fellow in internal medicine and gastroenterology at Mayo Clinic. While in Minnesota, he earned his Master of Science degree from the University of Minnesota. He served as clinical professor of medicine at Baylor College of Medicine and as chief of the gastroenterology department at Methodist Hospital. Dr. Kelsey, along with Dr. William Seybold and Dr. William Kelsey developed Houston’s Kelsey-Seybold Clinics.
Citation: CHRONICLE, CINDY HORSWELL HOUSTON. "John Kelsey, Founder of Clinic Bearing His Name, Dies." Houston Chronicle. N.p., 24 July 2010. Web.

Levine, Jack H.

  • Person
  • 1923-2009

Jack H. Levine was born in 1923 in Waco, Texas. He practiced dentistry for thirty-five years and taught at U.T. Dental School for fifteen years.

Autrey, A. M., Jr.

  • Person
  • 1899-1983

Adam Manuel Autrey, Jr., was born October 31, 1899 and died June 17, 1983; he is buried in Forest Park Cemetery in Houston.

Autrey, A.M., Sr.

  • Person
  • 1863-1935

Dr. A.M. Autrey, Sr., was an eye, ear, nose, and throat specialist. He was born October 4, 1863, in Veracruz, Mexico. He died December 28, 1935, in Houston and is buried at Forest Park Cemetery.

Knowles, W. Roy

  • Person
  • 1929-2005

William Roy Knowles was born in Gilmer, Texas, on December 13, 1929 and died in Houston on September 3, 2005. He is buried at Memorial Oaks Cemetery. He trained as a dermatologist at Baylor College of Medicine starting in 1965. The announcement of the establishment of his office in Houston in 1968 notes that he was one of two dermatologists in Texas at the time capable of performing “chemosurgery” to remove skin cancers. He seems to have had an ongoing interest in Civil War medicine; local papers note that he sometimes gave talks on the subject. His brother Royce was also in medical practice in Palestine.

McCorkle, Robert G.

  • Person
  • 1923-1979

Robert George McCorkle, Jr., was born in San Antonio, Texas, on September 18, 1923, and died January 24, 1979. His father, Robert G. McCorkle, Sr., (March 16, 1892 – March 20 1954) was also a doctor.

Barkley, James E.

  • Person
  • 1925-2014

James Earl Barkley, Jr., was born January 21, 1925, in Uhrichsville, Ohio. He served in Europe and Asia during World War II and was assigned for awhile to the pharmacy at Camp Cooke in Los Angeles, California. He obtained a pharmacy degree from Ohio State University in 1951 and began working for Burroughs Wellcome. He was transferred to Houston in 1961. Barkley spent five years in Washington, DC, between 1962 and 1967, but then returned to Houston. He died on March 20, 2014 and is buried at Forest Park Westheimer Cemetery.
Henry Solomon Wellcome was born August 21, 1853, in a log cabin near what would later become Almond, Wisconsin. He and Silas Mainville Burroughs formed Burroughs, Wellcome, & Co. in 1880. In 1884, they introduced to England the idea of selling medications in tablet form instead of the usual powders or liquids. They also pioneered direct marketing to doctors. Burroughs died in 1895 but the company did well under Wellcome’s direction. Wellcome became a British subject in 1910. Wellcome’s enterprises had been consolidated into the Wellcome Foundation, Ltd., in 1924 and, upon his death on July 25, 1936, this formed the foundation for the Wellcome Trust, which remains one of the world’s largest private biomedical charities.

Sobocinski, Robert

  • Person
  • 1928-2009

Robert Stanley Sobocinski was born April 6, 1928 in North Tonawanda, New York. He earned his MD from the University of Buffalo Medical School and served as medical officer in the US Navy between 1952 and 1955, aboard the USS Siboney. He was a family physician in Houston for many years. He died August 4, 2009, and is buried at Forest Park East in Webster

Moore, John T.

  • Person
  • 1864-1951

John T. Moore, MD, was the first man in the United States “to use radium as part of an operation in the treatment of cancer, he was one of the pioneers in clinical research,” according to an obituary that appeared in the Houston Post, section 1, page 6 on March 20, 1951. Dr. Moore was born in Moore’s Grove. He attended Sam Houston Normal Institute. He was educator before studying medicine. He was superintendent of schools in Trinity, Texas and then Orange, Texas. Dr. Moore received his master’s degree from Texas Christian University and his medical degree from the University of Texas School of Medicine at Galveston. He did graduate work at Johns Hopkins University and the University of Vienna. He was a former president of the Harris County Medical Society. He was a member of the Texas Surgical Society and other medical organizations. Dr. Moore was one of the organizers of the Texas State Medical Society.

Dr. Moore was born September 4, 1864 and died March 1, 1951.

Watts, Elie M., III

  • Person
  • 1940-2012

Elie Moores Watts III, born January 6, 1940, in Bowie, Texas died October 17, 2012, in Texarkana. He went to East Texas State University (now Texas A&M University - Commerce) in Commerce. He lived in New Boston, Texas, and is buried there at Read Hill Cemetery.

NASA

Garrott, Helen Holt

Helen Holt Garrott was the first full-time librarian for the Houston Academy of Medicine Library (later Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center Library). Helen Holt began working at the Houston Academy of Medicine Library in 1927, soon after the library and Harris County Medical Society moved into the brand new Medical Arts Building, and she was librarian for 50 years till about 1957.

Untitled

Joseph P. Maurer was a photographer in the Houston-area. He was the photographer credited in the 1960 edition of the Harris County Medical Society Pictorial Roster and Handbook. He was one of five photographers acknowledged in the annual publication from 1954-1968. Other photographers include Gorndon Conner (1954-1958), Arch Hetherwick (1959), Roulande (1961-1962), and Foley’s department store (1965). Photographer appeared to take portrait of new members as well as prepare photographs for print.

The first Harris County Medical Society Pictorial Roster and Handbook of the was published in 1954. Patterned after a similar publication by the Jackson County Medical Society of Missouri (Kansas City), it provided portraits of Harris County Medical Society current members in the year of publication along with medical specialty and biographical information. Dr. Wendell H Hamrick was the first editor.

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