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JNIH

  • Corporate body

Medical World News

  • Corporate body
  • 1960-1994

Medical World News (MWN) was a weekly publication that focused on medical developments, issues, and personalities. It was published for 35 years from 1960 to 1994. Self-described as "The Newsmagazine of Medicine,” Medical World News was the only news magazine devoted solely to medicine during its years of publication.

With Maxwell M. Geffen as the publisher, the first issue of Medical World News hit the newsstand on April 22, 1960. It began as a biweekly publication, but quickly increased its frequency to every week. From the beginning Medical World News aspired to be more than just another medical journal. As Geffen describes in his first Letter from the Publisher, “Medical World News proposes to offer a new, unique and clear channel of communication between the profession and the world around it, and to set new standards of accuracy and disclosure, covering every phase of medical journalism.” (MWN, 1960, 04/22, p.11) It was a unique and independent publication with the freedom to report all aspects on controversial issues in medicine. Its target audience was the physician, and the image-rich content was “designed to facilitate communications and easy reading.” (MWN, 1960, 04/22, p.11) Within the first 2 months, Medical World News covered “the Kefauver investigation, the rapid developments surrounding medical care for the aged, the debate of the ‘polio greats,’ the use of oral contraceptives and the exciting conversation of tumorous cells into normal cells by a Rockefeller Institute scientist.” (MWN, 1960, 06/03, p.9)

Morris Fishbein, previously editor of Journal of the American Medical Association, was the first editor for the Medical World News. He shaped the tone and concepts of the publication, emphasizing photography to differentiate Medical World News from other medical journals. He had a photo staff of six people, including Rick Giacalone as art director and Don Monaco and Martha Roberts as photo editors. The work of the staff and amount of images created, reviewed, and used for each story was a massive undertaking. Geffen describes, “[the picture staff] handles about 30,000 pictures every year. For a single story, they may scrutinize as many as 150 color slides or a dozen rolls of 36-frame black-and-white film--from which they will choose only four or five of the best for publication.” (MWN, 1967, 03/31, p.21) To capture all the footage, Medical World News hired freelance photographers for assignments all over the world. Many were members of the American Society of Magazine Photographers. Notable photographers who contributed to issues are George Tames, Art Shay, Joe Baker, James Pickerell, Ivan Massar, Jerry Miller, Al Geise, Mike Shea, Dennis Galloway, and Bob Phillips. Some photographers were associated with photo agencies, like Black Star and Magnum Photos.

Ownership of the Medical World News changed throughout its 35-year history. The following is a list of publishing companies, their locations, and years of ownership: Medical World News Publishing Company, New York, NY, 1960-1967 McGraw-Hill Publications, New York, NY, 1967-1981 Hospital Equities International (HEI) Publishing Company, Houston, TX, 1981-1985 Miller Freeman Inc., San Francisco, CA, 1985-1992 Axel Springer Publications, New York, NY, 1992-1994

By the 1990s Medical World News had become a monthly magazine. Nicholas K. Zittel was the last editor, and he wrote in his final Editor’s Note, “Over the years, MWN has fought valiantly to fulfill [its] promise. The ‘war on cancer,’ the artificial heart, Medicare, advances in neonatology, the halcyon days of drug discovery, political battles in Congress. With its comprehensive coverage of these and other critical issues MWN has fought tirelessly for and on behalf of the primary-care physician.” (MWN, February 1994, p.2) The last issue of the Medical World News was published in February 1994.

SOURCES: Medical World News, 1960, 1967, 1994; IC 077 Medical World News Photograph Collection

Memorial Hospital System

  • Corporate body
  • 1907-1997

Founded on September 1, 1907 as the Baptist Sanitarium, Memorial Hospital began as a two-story, wood-framed building at the end of the trolley line on Lamar and Smith. It had 17 beds and eight trained nurses on staff. It was the second general hospital established in Houston after St. Joseph Hospital which opened in 1887. It was also the second Baptist-supported hospital in the United States. The other was the Missouri Baptist Sanitarium in St. Louis.

In 1904 the only general hospital in Houston, St. Joseph Hospital, had 125 beds. The lack of hospital care available in Houston at the time became a discussion between two Baptist ministers, Dr. L. T. Mays (South Main Baptist Church) and Rev. D. R. Pevoto (Clark Avenue Baptist Church). They wanted to open a new hospital to serve the people of Houston regardless of race, religion, or wealth. It remained only an idea for years as discussions began to involve more people in the community, like Dr. J. L. Gross (pastor of First Baptist Church of Houston), Dr. George Truett, and George Hermann. Mrs. Charles Stewart, member of First Baptist Church of Houston gave $1,000 as a down payment to purchase the two-story Ida J. Rudisill Sanitarium for $18,000. The building had only been in use for two years since 1905. Mrs. Rudisill stayed on serving as director of nursing until about 1912. In 1910, the Baptist Convention of Texas was officially affiliated with the hospital. Pevoto, who managed the hospital until 1917, wrote, “ In those days a hospital was looked upon with apprehension as just a place where one went to die. We decided to change all that.”

Memorial Hospital expanded “piecemeal” one building or building addition at a time, adding more beds as they could. The original Rudisill Building stood for over 50 years. Becoming the nurses quarters and even moved across the street at one point. Below is a brief timeline for the early expansion of Memorial Hospital:

1911: A four-story fireproof building was built and increased capacity to 50 beds.
1915: The hospital built an eight-story building and doubled the capacity to 100 beds.
1924: “A” wing was added, increasing the capacity to 215 beds.
1942: Another addition increased capacity to almost 300 beds.
1945: H. R. Cullen gave $2 million to Lillie Jolly School of Nursing for the construction of the Professional Nurses’ Building.
Through its history, Memorial Hospital was a leader in health care in Houston, establishing many “firsts”:

First chartered school of nursing, 1909
First general hospital to offer psychiatric care, 1920s
First “fever box” in the US to resuscitate newborns, 1930s
First therapeutic tank to treat polio, 1930s
First hospital in Texas to have air-conditioned operating rooms and nurseries, 1930s
First hospital in Texas to receive penicillin shipment, 1943
First hospital to expand services into the Houston suburban areas and developed the hospital satellite system, 1960s
In the 1940s, Memorial opted not to move into the Texas Medical Center, remaining in downtown where it was closer to patients. With the same, consistent mission to provide the communities of Houston with excellent health care at a reasonable cost, Memorial developed the hospital satellite system. In the 1960s, it open three community hospitals in the Southwest (1962), Southeast (1963), and Northwest (1966). The new system allowed regional hospitals to serve the community around them while sharing services, resources, and costs with other hospitals in the Memorial Healthcare System. As W. Wilson Turner, administrator of Memorial Hospital 1958-1981 remarked, “Memorial was a pioneer of multiple health care units under one administrative management in the country.”

In 1971, in order to accept federal and community funds, Memorial Hospital broke ties with the Baptist General Convention of Texas. After 70 years, Memorial closed its downtown hospital in 1977 and moved to the Southwest location on the Southwest Freeway at Beechnut. Everything was moved patients, equipment, supplies, furnishings, and even the Bowles Chapel, which was disassembled and rebuilt piece by piece.

In 1997 Memorial Hospital merged with Hermann Hospital, becoming Memorial Hermann Healthcare System. Today, it is one of the largest non-for-profit healthcare system in Texas with roughly 19 hospitals and several specialty service points throughout the Greater Houston area.

Other notable individuals in the collection:

Lillian Irene Wilson Burnett Jolly (Lillie Jolly) was born near Louisville, Kentucky in 1877. She graduated from the School of Nursing at the Kentucky School of Medicine in 1907. Before attending school she worked in mental health institutions. In 1908, she moved to Houston to be a surgeon’s assistant and director of nurses at the Baptist Sanitarium (later Memorial Hospital). Lillie Jolly was director of the Hospital Training School for Nurses for over 30 years, 1908-1947. In 1945 the school was renamed in her honor, the Lillie Jolly School of Nursing. From 1917 to 1920, she served as superintendent, leading the hospital for two years before re-focusing her attention to the nurses and the nursing school. Robert Jolly became superintendent and served in the position from 1920-1945. Robert and Lillie Jolly were married at the stroke of midnight on New Year’s Day 1924. She retired in 1947. Lillie Jolly died in 1953.

Robert Jolly was born in Cave City, Kentucky in 1885. He was a Baptist minister. He became the Business Manager for the Baptist Sanitarium in 1919. In 1920 he took over as superintendent for the hospital, a position he held until his retirement in 1945. As superintendent, Jolly oversaw the development and growth of the hospital for 24 years. Jolly was a great fundraiser and worked to make Memorial Hospital one of the leaders in health care. In 1922, the American College of Surgeons awarded Memorial its hospital certification. Jolly also represented the hospital in national organizations, taking leadership positions in the Texas Hospital Association, American Protestant Hospital Association, American Hospital Association, and American College of Hospital Administrators. Robert Jolly died in 1952.

Lela Smith Hickey (Mrs. H. H.) graduated from the Lillie Jolly School of Nursing in 1933. She donated a collection of about 31 photographs that depict the nurses, nursing students, physicians, and facilities of Memorial Hospital in 1932, including the operating room supervisor “Birdie” Byrd. According to a note found in the collection, she was a distant cousin of D. R. Pevoto, founder of Memorial Hospital, and worked “CU” [perhaps, Intensive Care Unit] until early 1960s. Lela Smith Hickey died May 7, 1970.

Col. J. W. Neal and wife, Elizabeth Mitchell Neal, founders of the Cheek-Neal Coffee Co. that made Maxell House famous, were staunch Baptists who supported Memorial Hospital. He became a trustee in the 1920s, and they created two trust funds at the hospital in memory of their children Margaret Ophelia Neal for sick and disabled children and James Robert Neal for X-ray treatment of cancer. In 1944 Mrs. Neal gave Memorial Hospital the block used for their Nurses’ Professional Building in Downtown Houston. Hugh Roy Cullen provided the funds to construct the building, donating $2 million. The building was completed in 1948.

SOURCES:

“History of Memorial Hospital Much Like city’s dynamic story” by Betty Ewing. Houston Chronicle, 1982, 11/27. Reference Files; Memorial Hospital System [Baptist Sanatorium], (Houston, Texas); John P. McGovern Historical Collections and Research Center, Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center Library
“Memorial Hospital Facility to Celebrate Its 75th Anniversary at banquet Tonight” by Mary Jane Schier. Houston Post, 1982, 11/29. Reference Files; Memorial Hospital System [Baptist Sanatorium], (Houston, Texas); John P. McGovern Historical Collections and Research Center, Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center Library
News clipping, Box 9, Folder 22, “Mrs. Lillie Jolly has Always Liked to Help People” by Bess Whitehead Scott, [unknown newspaper], Houston, TX. 1938, 01/09. Memorial Hospital records; IC 022; John P. McGovern Historical Collections and Research Center, Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center Library
“Memorial’s 50th Year Observed” by George DeMenil. Houston Post, 1957, 08/25. Reference Files; Memorial Hospital System [Baptist Sanatorium], (Houston, Texas); John P. McGovern Historical Collections and Research Center, Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center Library
Note and catalog card for P-176 in Lela Smith Hickey Collection. Memorial Hospital Photograph Collection; IC 103; John P. McGovern Historical Collections and Research Center, Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center Library
Francis, Ted and Carole McFarland. 1982. The Memorial Hospital System: The First Seventy-Five Years. Special Commemorative Edition. Houston: Larksdale Press.
Memorial Hermann website, About us, http://www.memorialhermann.org/about-us/, Accessed: 10/12/2018
Handbook of Texas Online, Diana J. Kleiner, “MEMORIAL HEALTHCARE SYSTEM,” accessed September 19, 2018, http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/sbm07.

Wolf, Edward Trowbridge

  • Person
  • 1900-1987

Edward Trowbridge Wolf, MD was born May 2, 1900 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He received his Bachelor of Science in Pre—Med from Pennsylvania State College and in 1948 was honored with a 25 year Service Award from the Phi Delta Epsilon Medical Fraternity there. He was a June 1933 graduate of Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia, PA. Dr. Wolf served his internship at the Frankford Hospital in Philadelphia from 1933 to 1934 and at the William Beaumont General Hospital while in the US Army. Upon coming to Houston, he established his 46-year Internal Medicine practice at 4411 Fannin.

During WWII, Dr. Wolf was called up for active duty by the US. Army during which time he served at the rank of Major (MAJ), beginning January 1941, until his promotion to Lieutenant Colonel (LTC) in February 1943. In addition to stateside assignments, he was a veteran of two years of service with the medical corps in Australia and in the jungles of New Guinea. Following his service in Australia, he returned to inactive military status separating from the service in August 1945 to resume his Houston practice. LTC Wolf received an Honorable Discharge from the Army in May of 1951.

Dr. Wolf was appointed to the Baylor University College of Medicine Clinical Faculty as Assistant/Associate Professor of Medicine in Sept. 1943 and continuously held the position through June 1975. While a member of the medical staff at the Methodist Hospital in Houston, Dr. Wolf served as the Chairman of the Metabolic, Endocrine, Joint Disease Medical Care Appraisal Committee and Chairman of the Publications Committee. He was the first editor of News Notes published for the Methodist Hospital medical staff, a post he held for 5 years. Dr. Wolf was chairman of the first Blood Bank Committee of the Harris County Medical Society, and is perhaps most widely known as editor, for 10 years, of the Medical Record and Annals.

As a 45-year member of the Harris County Medical Society he served on the Press Committee. Dr. Wolf was Historian of Houston Society of Internal Medicine and in 1951, President of the Postgraduate Medical Assembly of South Texas. He was a member of the Texas Medical Association for 50 years, serving in 1968, as Chairman of the Technical Exhibits Sub-Committee. An Associate of the American College of Physicians, Dr. Wolf also held memberships in the American Medical Association, American Society of Internal Medicine and the NIH Alumni Association. He served as Consulting Internist for the Texas State Highway Patrol, the Southern Pacific Railroad (1961-1965), and was Consulting Internist and a member of the Board of both Planned Parenthood and the Visiting Nurses Association.

In addition to his professional service, Dr. Wolf contributed to many local organizations including the Deptartment of Medicine Library Fund of the Baylor College of Medicine, the Dept. of Medicine Library Fund of the Methodist Hospital, the Ellard Yow Memorial Library at Methodist Hospital, and The Foundation for the Museum of Medical Science. Edward Trowbridge Wolf, MD passed away July 15 1987.

Baird, Valliant Clinton

  • Person
  • 1904-1986

Valliant C. Baird MD, contributed to the organization of industrial health programs during their nascent years.

Dr. Baird was born September 28, 1904 in Pancake/Gatesville TX. He received his BS. in Pre—Med from Tulane University in 1925 having been a member of the Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor Society and Theta Kappa Psi Medical Fraternity. He was a 1928 graduate of Tulane in New Orleans, Louisiana. Dr. Baird served his internship and residency at the Mercy and Charity Hospitals in New Orleans from 1933 to 1934 He then spent some time as an oilfield physician.

Upon coming to Houston, he established his career in Industrial Medicine and as an Oilfield physician for 39 years with Humble Oil and Refining Company (currently known as Exxon Mobil). His roles include assistant chief physician in 1935 and chief physician in 1944. Dr. Baird also served as Professor of Occupational Medicine at the University Of Texas School Of Public Health in Houston and as Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine Clinical Associate Professor of Industrial Medicine in the Department of Virology and Epidemiology at Baylor School of Medicine in Houston. Dr. Baird was also President of Medical Research Foundation of Texas in 1960-61.

Papers include Dr. Baird’s resume up until 1963, the biography proof of what was published in who’s who in America, 37th Edition., newspaper clippings, medical journal articles, meeting and conference presentation notes and summaries, and pamphlets; all papers are related to either or both 1) honors and awards in the Oil and Gas Industry in particular as Chief Physician for Humble Oil and Refining Company (currently known as Exxon Mobile); and 2) industrial medicine specific to promoting physical and mental health well-being for employees and their families, which is often referred to as the Hygiene Program; the program discusses the importance of both personal and environmental hygiene.

Dr. Baird’s publications discuss the following topics: Chemical Hazards – Industry, Farm, and Home, Suicide, Paget’s disease, Coronary Artery Disease, Preventive Medicine correlates to specific age groups, plan of organization of an industrial health program, advocated pre-employment examinations, carotid sinus syndrome.

O'Heeron, Michael K.

  • Person
  • 1908-1980

Michael K. O’Heeron, MD (1908-1980) was a clinical professor of urology at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, TX. He also worked in the urology department at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Houston, TX.

Stork, Walter J.

  • Person
  • 1900-1994

Walter Jacob Stork, MD, was born in Round Top, Texas in October 27, 1900. He was educated at University of Texas, receiving his M.D. in 1931. Dr. Stork served with the U.S. Army Medical Corps, (1943-1946), served as a physician and taught at Baylor University College of Medicine Department of Radiology (1973-1976). Dr. Stork’s research and publications feature the following topics: “Radiology and on Tuberculosis treatment and prevention and control. He also worked on development of an antibiotic to treat tuberculosis. Further information and a bibliography of Dr. Stork’s papers are available in the first folder of this collection.

Dr. Stork died on September 8, 1994, in Houston.

Skjonsby, Harold S.

  • Person
  • 1937-2017

Harold S. Skjonsby, DDS, (July 6, 1937 - July 2017) served as a faculty member at the University of Texas Dental Branch at Houston in the 1960s to the 1980s. He was involved in various faculty committees, including the Evaluation Committee, Developmental Biology Committee, Cell and Tissue Biology Committee, Human Biology Committee, and the Teaching Committee. Skjonsby also served as an academic advisor to dentistry students.

Greer, Alvis

  • Person
  • 1885-1975

Alvis Eugene Greer was born May 6, 1885, in Gallatin, Illinois. He earned his MD from Northwestern University in 1908 and received an Alpha Omega Alpha key at graduation. He spent two years at Harvard Postgraduate Medical School and served in the Army Medical Corps in World War I. Geer specialized in internal medicine and diseases of the chest. Taught at Baylor College of Medicine and was on staff at the Houston Tuberculosis Hospital, Memorial Hospital, and Jefferson Davis Hospital. He was a member of the American College of Chest Physicians, serving on its board of examiners from 1946 to 1952 and president from 1953 to 1954. He died in Houston on August 8, 1975, and is buried at Forest Park Cemetery.

Huggins, Russell A.

  • Person
  • 1910-2001

Russell Arno Huggins was born 1910 June 25 in Cleveland, Ohio. Huggins graduated from Aurora College in Illinois and earned his Ph.D. in biology from the Case School of Applied Science, now Case Western Reserve University, in the later 1930s. He taught at the University of South Dakota Medical School from 1943 to 1945 and the University of Georgia College of Medicine in Augusta from 1945 to 1947. He joined the Baylor College of Medicine faculty in the department of pharmacology in 1947, then moved to physiology in 1960 and pediatrics in 1980. He contributed to the development of the departments of physiology at the University of San Juan, Puerto Rico, and Mahidol University in Bangkok, Thailand. Dr. Huggins was noted for his work in cardiovascular physiology and pharmacology, which contributed to the development of techniques for heart catheterization. He was a founding staff member of the USDA-Baylor Children’s Nutritional Research Center.
Dr. Huggins was married to Professor Sara Elizabeth Huggins, the University of Houston’s first female chair of the biology department. He died August 1, 2001, in Ithaca, New York, and is buried in Memorial Oaks Cemetery in Houston.

Haas, Felix

  • Person
  • 1917-

Dr. Felix Levere Haas was born on October 26, 1917 in Alvin, Texas, the oldest son of three children. The Alvin native entered the University of Texas at Austin in 1939. His studies were interrupted with the onset of World War II. Haas en listed in the United States Army Air Corps. He received aviation training from January 5, 1942 - September 5, 1942. As a navigator he led numerous combat missions with the 13th Air Force over the South Pacific. He served until February 22, 1946 and was promoted to the rank of Captain.
In June of 1947, Haas received his Bachelor of Arts degree in Genetics and Bacteriology from U.T. He was awarded the Rosalie B. Hite Predoctoral Fellowship and continued to study for his Masters of Arts. Drs. Wilson S. Stone and Orville Wyss were pleased to have Haas as their research fellow. While experimenting he made an important discovery in the genetics of micro-organisms. He found that irradiation of the growth medium resulted in genetic mutations in bacteria when they were grown in it. In short, a biochemical basis must be present to produce mutations.
Felix Haas continued his research earning his M.A. in August of 1948. That same year he met Cathryn E. Swausch, Dr. Wyss' laboratory assistant. They worked closely together for the next two years and were married on January 21, 1950. By June, Dr. Haas received his doctorate in Biochemistry and Biology.
The Haas couple left the University of Texas at Austin for the California Institute of Technology, where Dr. Haas accepted a one year (1950-1951) postdoctoral fellowship in Genetics from the Eli Lilly Company. At the Institute he worked with Drs. George Beadle and Herschell Mitchell. The following year he was awarded a USPHS Postdoctoral Fellowship at the California Institute of Technology. With the outbreak of the Korean War Dr. Haas was recalled to active military duty. As a result he had to decline the fellowship.
Upon his return to Texas, Dr. Wilson Stone arranged for him an indefinite delay in the re-activation orders. He also made it possible for Dr. Haas to work as a research scientist for the Atomic Energy Commission. He conducted his research on the campus of the University of Texas at Austin and the Old Baker Estate in Houston (M.D. Anderson Hospital). Professor Stone and Dr. Haas worked closely until March of 1953.
The Bristol Laboratories Inc. of Syracuse, New York offered him the position of Senior Microbiologist. In his three years (1953-1956) with Bristol Laboratories he directed research on: improving by genetic mutations mold strains (Penicillium) used for the commercial production of penicillin; developing the Actinomycete strains which led to the production of tetracycline by fermentation (this production method and strain are currently responsible for the largest part of the world's supply of tetracycline). Dr. Haas also taught graduate students at the University of Syracuse. As an Associate Professor of Genetics he taught Genetics and Radiation Biology.
Dr. and Mrs. Haas and their three young sons left Syracuse, New York in May of 1956 and returned to Houston. The M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute appointed him head of the Department of Biology (1956-1975). His responsibilities included recruitment of faculty, formulating research and teaching policies, long-range planning and investigating funding sources.
From 1973 to 1975 Dr. Haas also served as Assistant to the Director of Research at M.D. Anderson Hospital.
Dr. Haas resigned as head of the Department of Biology in 1975 to assume the full duties of coordinating the research program of the hospital. He supervised and directed the Office of Research and served as advisor to the director and president on all matters concerning research at M.D. Anderson Hospital. In 1979 he accepted the position of staff assistant to the president.
On approval of the Board of Regents, the request for establishment of the UT GSBS was presented to the Texas Legislature, and was passed in Spring 1963. Governor John Connally signed the bill into law on June 10, 1963. By action of the Board of Regents the authorized school was established on September 28,1963.
Dr. Haas was a key figure in the founding of UT GSBS at Houston. He served as an important member of many special and standing GSBS Committees.
Between UT SCC, M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute and UT GSBS at Houston Dr. Haas was an active member of nearly twenty committees. They include: Education; Curriculum; Committee on Graduate Studies; Dean's Administrative Committee; Faculty Classification Committee. Virtually, every year since 1949, Dr. Haas has been a principal participant in national and international symposia and conferences. He has written forty three articles and nineteen abstracts. Dr. Haas lists memberships in the following professional and scientific societies: American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Society of Microbiology, Genetics Society of America, American Academy of Microbiology, American Institute of Biological Sciences, Radiation Research Society, American Association for Cancer Research, American Genetic Association. He has been honored by Phi Theta Kappa, Sigma Xi, listed in Who's Who in the South and Southwest and American Men of Science.
Dr. Felix L. Haas' leadership, knowledge and skill have touched and enriched the lives of many. His dedication was essential to the success of established and new programs organized by UT SCC, M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute and UT GSBS at Houston. Dr. Haas retired in 1981 to enjoy his love of art, music, and spend time with his wife, Cathryn and their three sons, Michael, Stephen and Larry.

Note: Felix Haas in the Library of Congress does not appear to be this Felix Haas.

Wigodsky, Herman

  • Person
  • 1915-2005

Herman S. Wigodsky was born in Sioux City, Iowa on June 12, 1915. His undergraduate education took place in South Dakota. In 1936 he received his Bachelor of Arts in the field of biology from Yankton College, Yankton, South Dakota. While at University of South Dakota, he was a laboratory instructor in the Department of Physiology and Pharmacology in the School of Medicine. The following year he received a Bachelor of Science degree in the field of medicine from the University of South Dakota, Vermillion South Dakota. From 1937 to 1941 he studied at Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, Illinois. During his years at Northwestern he served as a research associate in the Department of Physiology. In 1938 he received a Master of Science degree in the field of physiology. After two more years of study he graduated with a Bachelor of Medicine and a Doctorate in physiology. Finally in 1941 he graduated with a Doctor of Medicine degree. Dr. Wigodsky completed an internship at Evanston Hospital, Evanston, Illinois, 1940-1941. After his internship Dr. Wigodsky taught at Northwestern University as an Instructor in the Department of Physiology. 1940-1946.

Dr. Wigodsky's service with the United States Military began in 1939. He served in the U.S. Army and Air Force Reserves, in ranks First Lieutenant to Lieutenant Colonel from 1939-1971. His first assignment with the United States Air Force was as Chief of the Department of Physiology, USAF School of Aviation Medicine, Randolph Field, Texas. From the period, 1939 to 1947 Dr. Wigodsky accepted ten assignments from the United States Air Force.

Dr. Wigodsky became associated with the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) in 1947. He was the Professional Associate on the Committee on Atomic Casualties, National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council, Washington, D.C. His assignment with the ABCC concluded in 1950 but his interest in nuclear accidents and radiation research continued.

Dr. Wigodsky was affiliated with the University of Texas Health Science Center and Medical School at San Antonio, starting in 1955. His first appointment was from 1955-1961, as the Director of the University of Texas Post-Graduate School of Medicine, San Antonio, Texas. Dr. Wigodsky served as a consultant and later as an Associate Coordinator for the University's Regional Medical Program Planning Office, 1967- 1968, 1968-1970. For eight years, 1970-1978 he was a lecturer in the Department of Pathology. In 1978 he was promoted to Clinical Professor. He was very active as a physician, professor, consultant and administrator. He coauthored a chapter entitled "Humans as Research Subjects" for the book In Birth to Death: Biology, Science, and Bioethics editors T. Kushmer and D. Thomasma. His principal research interest is "Pathophysiology of atherosclerosis utilizing the baboon as an animal model for human cardiovascular disease risk factors."

Dr. Wigodsky married Jo Ann Pincus in 1946. They had three grown children - John, Dan and Ann. He died January 24, 2005.

Pruessner, Harold

  • Person
  • 1925-2007

Harold Trebus Pruessner was born February 19, 1925, in San Antonio. He attended Texas A&M University and earned an MD from the University of Texas Medical Branch in 1948. He served in the Navy during the Korean war and then practiced in Corpus Christi for more than twenty years. He joined the University of Texas Medical School in Houston in 1972 as the second member of its department of family practice. Dr. Pruessner was an early advocate of preventive medicine. He retired in 1993 and died December 21, 2007 at his ranch in Caldwell.

Warwick, Harold Lynwood

  • Person
  • 1877-1941

Dr. Harold Warwick was born November 8, 1877, in Macon, Georgia. He graduated from the Academy of Richmond County in 1895 with a degree in engineering and from the University of Georgia with an MD in 1900. He married Lydia A. Houston in Savannah on November 28, 1901 and they moved to Fort Worth in 1903. He served as a captain in the medical corps during World War I and was decorated by the French. His was an inveterate tinkerer and invented an early type of wire recorder in 1932. He died of bladder cancer, which is obituary attributes to his early experimentation with radiography, on April 28, 1941 in Fort Worth.

Barnes, Frank L.

  • Person
  • 1872-1943

Frank Lister Barnes was born September 26, 1872 in Trinity, Texas, and died October 2, 1943, in Houston. Barnes graduated from Hill’s College in Waco and earned his MD from the College of Physicians and Surgeons in Baltimore, Maryland (this merged at some point with the University of Maryland School of Medicine) in 1896 and interned at Mercy Hospital. His middle name is sometimes reported to be “Lester”. He was a founding member of the Texas Surgical Society and American Board of Surgeons. He served in the Army, stationed at Galveston, during the Spanish-American War. Dr. Barnes built a hospital in Trinity in 1908 but moved to Houston in 1915. He is the father of Dr. Payton Barnes of Houston. Dr. Barnes is buried at Cedar Grove Cemetery in Trinity.
Note: Robert Howard Hill’s (1856-1919) Hill’s Business College operated in Waco from 1881 to about 1920. There is some information about it online (there were also multiple unrelated Hill’s Business Colleges operating in different states around the same time).

Brown, A. G. Boss

  • Person
  • 1873-1959

Arthur Gramson Boss Brown was born in Bosworth, Missouri, on February 10, 1873. He graduated from Simms Medical College in St. Louis in 1902 and moved to Dean Lake, Missouri, in 1903 but returned to Bosworth later that year and spent the rest of his life there. He retired due to failing health and sold his practice in 1948. Dr. Brown and his wife Clemma were killed when their car struck a bridge in Carrollton, Missouri, in February 1959 and are buried in Elizabeth Cemetery, south of Hale, Missouri. Most of the family seems to have stayed in Missouri but their son Dr. Wilson Gordon Brown (18 January 1914- 23 December 1990, buried at Elizabeth Cemetery) lived in Houston, which is probably why the Library has the bag. Dr. Brown’s brother William Gordon Brown (1865-1931) was also a doctor in Carroll County.
There are a lot of small items about Dr. Brown, and sometimes his brother, in social columns in old northern Missouri newspapers. One of them teases Dr. Brown about being a “regular practitioner” in reference to his formal training, as opposed to a “domestic practitioner”, who might have been apprenticed and/or self-taught. Because of the lax standards for entering medical school until well into the twentieth century, and patients’ tendency to trust known locals, “regular doctors” and formal training apparently had a hard time gaining acceptance in the public mind. Marion-Simms Medical College, later Marion-Simms-Beaumont College, was a (homeopathic? I’ve seen hints but cannot verify) medical school run by a group of physicians that operated from at least 1883 to the early 1900s. It was purchased by the Jesuit Brothers in 1903 and paired with St. John’s Hospital, and eventually merged with the much older medical department of Saint Louis University.

Cooper, Alan B.

  • Person
  • 1928-2002

Alan Bruce Cooper was born in New York, New York on August 19, 1928. He earned a BS in 1949 and a Master’s in immunogenetics in 1951 from Wesleyan University, followed by an MD in 1955 from New York Medical School. After serving as chief of pathology at Harvard University, he joined the Air Force. After his discharge as a major, he taught at Baylor College of Medicine and New Orleans Psychoanalytic Institute in psychiatry and psychoanalysis. He was also in private practice in Houston between 1968 and 1985. In 1986, Dr. Cooper was appointed medical director of the University of Texas Adult Ambulatory Psychiatric Services and was later a professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. He died in Houston on December 29, 2002, of lung cancer.

Rankin, Douglas H.

  • Person
  • 1949 -

Family physician Douglas H. Rankin was born August 23, 1949.

Andrews, Billy

  • Person
  • 1956-

ertified Medical Illustrator William M. Andrews was born July 4, 1956, in Chicago, Illinois, into an Air Force family, and grew up in California, Texas, Oklahoma, and Hawaii. He earned a Bachelor’s in art from the University of Texas at Austin in 1978 and a Master’s in Biomedical Communications from the University of Texas Health Science Center at Dallas in 1980. He began his career in Tucson as a medical illustrator for the University of Arizona Health Science Center. In 1981, he moved to Houston, where he has served several institutions within the Texas Medical Center, including the Texas Heart Institute and UT MD Anderson Cancer Center. He received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Association of Medical Illustrators in 2018. At this time (2020) he has been with the Augusta University Medical College of Georgia since 1999 and is pursuing a Ph.D. in Health Promotion, Education, and Behavior through the University of South Carolina, Columbia.

Efron, Bernard G.

  • Person
  • 1902-1960

Bernard Gelfond Efron was born November 22, 1902 in Russia. His family arrived in New York in 1910 and moved at some point to Baltimore, Maryland; Tulane University’s College of Medicine entry in the 1926 yearbook lists Efron as being from Baltimore. He seems to have graduated from Tulane University College of Medicine in 1926 and then stayed in New Orleans. He died on February 16, 1960, and is buried at the Garden of Memories in Metairie, Louisiana. (Looks as thought he may have been in the Army during World War II.)

Baun, Mara M.

  • Person
  • 1942-

Dr. Mara Madeleine Baun was born March 5, 1942, and has lived in Missouri City since 1973.

Barton, Sara Ann

  • Person
  • 1948-

Sara Ann Barton was born November 20, 1948, in Houston.

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