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Authority record
Texas (United States)

Medical Library Association. South Central Regional Group

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n50047048
  • Corporate body
  • 1970-

The South Central Chapter of the Medical Library Association has its roots in the Texas Council of Health Science Libraries, which was formed in 1966 in an effort to make the collections of the state’s health science libraries more accessible to all health professionals. A group of doctors and other interested individuals met to discuss the possibility of creating a regional organization to serve this purpose. This was to be considered the first meeting of the TCHSL. The second meeting was held in 1966 at the Jesse H. Jones Library Building in the Texas Medical Center in Houston. In 1967, TCHSL asked the National Library of Medicine to fund a regional medical library to serve Arkansas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Louisiana, and Texas. The proposal was accepted and in 1970 the South Central Regional Medical Library program began.
In 1970, a consideration was made to change the group to one with an affiliation to the Medical Library association. In 1971 in was proposed that membership be extended to “all health-related institutions and their staffs”. In 1972 the head of TCHSL contacted MLA members in the five-state area served by the SCRML looking for support in creating a new MLA chapter for the region. A meeting a month later in Houston proposed to a) dissolve the TCHSL with the understanding that it would be reformed as a new chapter of the MLA, b) keep unspent monies in escrow until said group was formed, c) appoint a committee comprising members of both past and new board to oversee the formation of said group. Jean Collier, president of the TCHSL resigned in preparation for the formation of the new group.
However, many of the members of TCHSL, especially in Louisiana and Arkansas, were already members of the Southern Chapter of MLA and were apparently not eager to make the change. When the proposition was put to a vote of TCHSL members, though, the majority was just enough that the petition to the MLA was approved. An organizational meeting for the new chapter was held in Little Rock in 1973; the tipping point for approval of the new group seems to have been that meetings would be closer than meetings of the Southern Chapter. The new group was named the South Central Regional Group. Due to some conflicts within the existing bylaws, Louisiana did not officially join the SCRG until 1982. The SCRG name was replaced by South Central Chapter in 1988 to better reflect the group’s position as an MLA affiliate. Annual meeting locations rotate among the five states.

Texas State Board of Medical Examiners

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n81132557
  • Corporate body
  • 1907-

The Texas Medical Board is the body responsible for regulating medical practitioners in the state of Texas through examination, licensing, setting standards of practice, and, if necessary, disciplinary action. Texas began regulating physicians in 1837 when Dr. Anson Jones, one of the few formally educated physicians in the state, wrote the Medical Practice Act. The Board of Medical Censors tested prospective physicians and granted licenses from 1837 until 1848. A new regulatory law for medical doctors was enacted in 1873 and the Texas State Board of Medical Examiners was formed in 1907. In 1993 the Board expanded to create the Texas State Board of Physician Assistant Examiners and the Texas State Board of Acupuncture Examiners. It was renamed the Texas Medical Board in 2005.

Texas Nurses Association

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n86833412
  • Corporate body
  • 1907-

Founded in 1907 as the Graduate Nurses’ Association of the State of Texas, to seek state regulation of the education and practice of nurses. In 1909, they convinced the state legislature to pass what was effectively the first nursing practice act, creating the Board of Nurse Examiners for the State of Texas. In 1913, the Association created better standards for nursing schools: Eight-hour days for students, three-year courses of study in all nursing schools, uniform curricula, higher entrance requirements, and better preparation for supervisory and teaching responsibilities. The name was changed to the Texas Nurses’ Association around 1964. The TNA has also worked to create policies for the inspection and accreditation of nursing schools, provide whistleblower protection, create better opportunities for nursing students, right of due process in peer review, and to generally improve the conditions for nurses in the state of Texas.

Watts, Elie M., III

  • Person
  • 1940-2012

Elie Moores Watts III, born January 6, 1940, in Bowie, Texas died October 17, 2012, in Texarkana. He went to East Texas State University (now Texas A&M University - Commerce) in Commerce. He lived in New Boston, Texas, and is buried there at Read Hill Cemetery.

Stroke Group of Texas

  • Corporate body

History unclear: The material in the collection begins in the early 1980s and the group appears to have been in existence as late as 1995 and possibly as late as 2006.

Barton, Sara Ann

  • Person
  • 1948-

Sara Ann Barton was born November 20, 1948, in Houston.

Texas-Mexico Border and Acres Home Project

  • Corporate body
  • 1988-

The University of Texas System Valley/Border Health Services Task Force was established in 1988 by the University of Texas System in conjunction with several other schools (University of Texas Heath Science Center at San Antonio and University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston among them) and community organizations to inventory existing health programs in the Rio Grande Valley/border region and use this information to improve health professional education, health services, and research activities in the area. The work continues today in the form of the Texas-Mexico Border Health Coordination Office.
Similarly, the Acres Homes Project (1996-2005) was a joint effort among several community organizations and the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston to study and improve community health in the Acres Homes neighborhood on Houston’s northwest side. A committee was assembled to assess the demographics, existing services, and needs of the community, and staff and students of UTHSCH were responsible for the technical aspects of the analysis.