Showing 7 results

Authority record
Galveston, Texas

Gregory, Raymond

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n2001080956
  • Person
  • 1901-1988

Dr. Raymond Gregory was born February 20, 1901, in Beeville, Texas. At age 15, he moved to Austin with his family. He received his B.A. and M.A. in organic chemistry in 1922 and 1923, respectively, from the University of Texas. He received his Ph.D in biochemistry from the University of Minnesota, and received his medical degree in 1930. Dr. Gregory completed his internship at Minneapolis General Hospital.

Dr. Gregory taught for a year after receiving his Ph.D, then joined his father-in-law in Hawarden, Iowa, to practice general medicine. From 1937-1939, he was professor and Head of the Department of Medicine at Howard University Medical School in Washington, D.C. From 1939-1940, he was professor and Head of Medicine at the University of Arkansas School of Medicine in Little Rock.

In 1940, Dr. Gregory returned to his home state as an Associate Professor of Medicine at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. He soon became chairman of the Department of Pharmacology. He later held the positions of Ashbel Smith Professor of Internal Medicine and Chairman of the Department of Internal Medicine. After retiring from UT-Galveston in 1968, Dr. Gregory worked at the Diagnostic Clinic of Houston until 1986.

Dr. Gregory died in 1988 (from "Summary of Interview with Doctor Gregory," Box 1 Folder 1; The Alcade May-June 1988).

Houston Galveston Area Council

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n80006171
  • Corporate body
  • 1966-

Founded in 1966 and funded by the US Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, the H-GAC is the regional planning and oversight organization through which local governments consider issues and cooperate in solving area-wide problems. H-GAC serves thirteen counties in the Houston-Galveston area. The greater HGAC includes departments of community and environmental planning (conservation, historic map collection), data services (geographic, information technology, web development, regional 911); finance and budget; human services (independent living for seniors; job placement; and aid for low-income persons); public services; and transportation.
The Health Systems Agency specifically seeks to promote the development of health systems in the region by determining need, developing an implementation plan, reviewing data, and reviewing applications for assistance. Among their missions “is to facilitate the procurement of goods and services in an open, fair, transparent, and economically competitive environment”.

Blocker, Truman G.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n87853438
  • Person
  • 1909-1984

Truman Graves Blocker, MD, was born 1909 April 17 in West Point, Mississippi. He attended school in Sherman, Texas and graduated from Austin College in 1929. He earned an MD from the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston in 1933, followed by an internship at the Graduate Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, and a year’s residency in surgery again in Galveston at John Sealy Hospital. He spent a short time as an instructor in surgery at the Columbia University-affiliated Presbyterian Hospital in New York City before returning to Galveston again in 1936 to take a position at UTMB as an assistant professor of surgery. He served as a surgeon first in the Air Force and then in the Army between 1942 and 1946, where he specialized in reconstructive plastic surgery. When he returned to UTMB in 1946 he became professor and head of the new department of plastic and maxillofacial surgery. Blocker’s wife, Dr. Virginia Blocker, was also a physician and, after the 1947 Texas City Disaster, they co-published a survey of the casualties. Blocker would eventually publish or co-publish 182 items, mostly on treatment and care of burn victims.
In addition to his research and teaching responsibilities, Blocker served in a diverse and complex variety of administrative positions, enabling him to influence the growth and expansion of UTMB. He was instrumental in convincing the Shriners to choose Galveston as the location for their burn hospital, and he retained an interest in military medicine for the rest of his life. UTMB commemorated him by renaming its Moody Medical Library for him after his death in 1984.

Levy, Moise Dreyfus

  • Person
  • 1889-1963

Moise Dreyfus Levy Sr, MD was born September 4, 1889 in Galveston, Texas and grew up in Natchitoches, Louisiana "where he attended school and later the Louisiana State Normal College" (Texas State Journal of Medicine volume 59 pages 248-49, March 1963). Levy graduated from the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston in 1913. He was awarded an internship at St. Louis City Hospital, St. Louis, Missouri (Texas State Journal of Medicine, volume 9).

Dr. Levy served two years in the United States Medical Corps during World War I. Afterwards, he returned to Texas where he became an assistant professor of medicine at his alma mater, the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston from 1915 until 1922. Levy served as a clinical professor at Baylor College of Medicine from 1943 to 1954 and was a professor emeritus from 1954 until his death in 1963 (TSJM 59:248-49, Mar., 1963).

Dr. Levy was the first president of the Texas Society of Pathology, which was founded in 1921 and continues to exist today. He was a founding member of the American Board of Internal Medicine and a fellow of the American College of Physicians. In 1957, Dr. Levy was elected president of the Harris County Medical Society. He was an active member of the medical community and was a member of many organizations including The American Heart Association, Houston Society of Internal Medicine, World Medical Association, American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygene.

Dr. Levy married Sarah Weill in 1917. They had four children: Moise D. Levy Jr. b.1918, Justine, Sara Jo and Melanie b. 1925. Dr. Levy's son Moise D. Levy, Jr. followed his father into medicine and became a successful rheumatologist.

Dr. Levy was active in Jewish affairs, he was twice elected president of the Houston Congregation for reformed Judiasm. He was active in the Rotary Club and in the Planned Parenthood Center of Houston. (TSJM 59:248-49, Mar., 1963).

Dr. Levy was the author of 33 published medical writings. Several of Dr. Levy's articles focused on the Houston / Galveston / Beaumont area, including a 1920 article on an epidemic of Dengue fever that had recently affected Galveston, TX and the surrounding area.

Dr. Moise Dreyfus Levy Sr. died at his home in Houston, TX on Jan. 30, 1963 at the age of 73.

Creson, Daniel Lenard

  • Person
  • 1935-2015

Born in 1935, Dr. Daniel L. Creson was in in private practice with North Texas Psychiatry and Psychotherapy in Denton, Texas. He was Professor Emeritus at The University of Texas Health Science Center - Houston in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. He served there as Clinical Professor and Director of Continuing Education before his retirement in 2003. He was Board Certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology in 1971.

Dr. Creson received his medical degree from The University of Texas Medical Branch-Galveston, Texas in 1962. He earned an MA in Behavioral Science and a PhD in Anthropology from Rice University, Houston Texas. He holds academic appointments at Galveston Family Institute, The University of Texas Medical Branch - Galveston and The University of Texas Health Science Center - Houston. Among his past positions, he served as Adjunct Associate Professor at Tulane University, Executive Director of Gulf Coast Regional Mental Health-Mental Retardation Center, and Medical Director of Mental Health Mental Retardation Authority of Harris County.

Dr. Creson was active on several boards of mental health mental retardation organizations in Galveston and Houston as well as several committees for the Texas Society of Psychiatric Physicians. He has been a member of the Crisis Response Consortium of Harris County and Burn Disaster Response Team for Shriners Burn Institute. In addition to his past work in crisis situations throughout the world, he continues to serve as consultant to Humanitarian Aid and Medical Development (HMD) and Christian Children's Fund. Dr. Creson was instrumental in the development of an historical archives project, which seeks to document the history of mental health services in Texas. He personally obtained oral histories from many psychiatrists and other professionals throughout Texas.

Dr. Creson died November 30, 2015, in Sanger, Texas.

Texas Nurses Association District 9

  • Corporate body
  • 1935-

District 9 of the Texas Nurses' Association opened in the Medical Arts Building in 1935. It originally encompassed 14 counties but now includes 8.

Prince, Homer, E.

  • Person
  • 1904-1990

Dr.Homer Edward Prince was born June 2, 1904 in Milam County, Texas. practiced general medicine in Galveston, Texas between 1930-1936. Between 1936-1958 Dr. Prince focused his practice on allergies in Houston, Texas. There he organized the Association of Allergists for Mycological Investigations in 1938. Between 1958-1962 he continued his practice half-time in Crockett, Texas. Dr. Prince would return to full-time practice in Waco, Texas, between 1962-1965. He would continue practicing in Waco until 1976. Dr. Prince died in Dallas County on June 5, 1990, and is buried at Evergreen Memorial Park in Crockett.