Showing 450 results

Authority record
Corporate body

Mayo Clinic

  • n79026897
  • Corporate body

John P. McGovern Historical Collections & Research Center

  • https://lccn.loc.gov/n2004120720
  • Corporate body
  • 1977-

The McGovern Historical Center (MHC) is the historical and special collections department for The TMC Library. The MHC maintains rare book and archival collections. Artificial collections have been created to provide access to materials without clear provenance in order to increase discoverability.

The earliest acquisition records for the books in the MHC are found in the Houston Academy of Medicine’s (HAM) Library Committee reports for 1935 and 1936. Thirty Fellows of the Academy raised $300 to purchase a collection of 275 French medical books published between 1730 and 1830. In 1949, HAM and Baylor College of Medicine combined their medical libraries. In anticipation of the completion of the Jesse H. Jones Building for the library, the MD Anderson Foundation purchased the rheumatology collection of a New York physician, Dr. Reginald Burbank. This purchase was followed by a gift from the Cora and Webb Mading Foundation of more than 1,000 titles on sanitation and communicable diseases. After the 1954 dedication of the library building, many physicians donated books or historical pamphlets to be stored in a very small, locked room on the second floor. Soon after his arrival in Houston, Dr. McGovern became one of the Library’s most staunch supporters, annually supplying funds for the purchase of rare books and travel support for the librarians to attend meetings of the American Association for the History of Medicine. In 1977, The Library formed a new department with new quarters to collect historical materials and to enhance the rare book collections. In 1982, Dr. McGovern donated his personal collection of rare and historical books to the Library. In 1996 the Library’s Board of Directors named the historical department in his honor.

Houston Grand Opera

  • https://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n83125405.html
  • Corporate body

Texas Woman's University

  • https://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n79150431.html
  • Corporate body
  • 1901-

Texas Woman's University was founded in 1901 in Denton, Texas, as the Texas Industrial Institute and College for the Education of White Girls of the State of Texas in the Arts and Sciences; the current name dates to 1957. It began the first nationally accredited nursing program, affiliated with Dallas' Parkland Hospital, in Texas in 1950 and began awarding doctorates in 1953. It became integrated in 1961 and coeducational in 1994. The health science and nursing programs have additional campuses in Dallas and Houston.

Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission

  • https://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n50073710.html
  • Corporate body
  • 1946-1975

The Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) was formed after the bombings on Hiroshima and Nagasaki on August 6 and August 9, 1945. On November 18, 1946, President Harry Truman authorized the National Research Council to establish the organization “to undertake long range, continuing study of the biological and medical effects of the atomic bomb on man.” Key members of the ABCC included Lewis Weed, Austin M. Brues and Paul Henshaw, physicians from the National Research Council, and Army representatives Melvin A. Block, and James V. Neel. By the time the ABCC arrived in Japan on November 24, 1946, the Japanese had already started studying the effects on both immediate and delayed atomic bomb damage in survivors. Masao Tsuzuki was the leading Japanese authority on the biological effects of radiation and determined the different types of damage caused by the bombs and the effects on the human body.

By 1951, the ABCC had 1063 employees, 143 allied and 920 Japanese. The most important contribution of the ABCC was the genetics study which focused on the long-term effects of radiation exposure on pregnant women and their unborn children. The study also looked at the effects of radiation on survivors and their children. The ABCC did not actually treat the survivors that they studied, but it did give the survivors an opportunity to receive several medical checkups each year.

By the mid-1950s, trust in the ABCC was declining. The Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) had threatened to stop funding in 1951, but James Neel managed to convince them to continue funding for another three years. In 1956 Neel and William J. Schull published their final draft of The Effect of Exposure to the Atomic Bombs on Pregnancy Termination in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Over time, the ABCC would become the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF). The RERF was officially establish on April 1, 1975 and is a binational organization run by both the United States and Japan to this day.

This information was taken from the Radiation Effects Research Foundation website at http://www.rerf.jp/glossary_e/abcc.htm and from the donor cards of the collection located in the The John P. McGovern Historical Collections and Research Center.

Anderson, Clayton & Co.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no94042115
  • Corporate body
  • 1904-

Formed in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma in 1904.

Harris County Medical Society (Tex.)

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no93003034
  • Corporate body
  • 1903-

Founded in 1903 to improve medical standards and health care in Harris County. Advocated for the creation of the Texas State Board of Medical Examiners in 1907, creating the state’s first standards for training and education of physicians and midwives. Over the years, it has run many public health and awareness campaigns for illnesses such as polio and AIDS, and functioned as a facilitator for emergency response resources in times of crisis. It has also spearheaded the formation of organizations such as the Houston Academy of Medicine, the HAM-TMC Library, the Gulf Coast Blood Center, and the Health Museum, and sponsors the John P. McGovern Compleat Physician Award for physicians whose careers embody the Oslerian ideals of medical excellence, ethics, and humanity.

University of Houston College of Pharmacy

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2020048313
  • Corporate body
  • 1947-

The University of Houston School of Pharmacy opened in 1947 in the science building of the University of Houston, with physician and pharmacist Allan Collette as acting dean. It became accredited by the American Council of Pharmaceutical Education in 1950. It moved to the Lamar Fleming Building in 1963 and then into a new building in the Texas Medical Center in 1981. Ph.D. programs in pharmacology and pharmaceutics were established in 1987. Between 1977 and ???? the School worked with Baylor College of Medicine and UT Medical School to operate the Houston Pharmacological Center to provide drug information to medical professionals.

MacKie and Kamrath

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2009044810
  • Corporate body
  • 1937-

Harris County Hospital District

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2008077807
  • Corporate body
  • 1965-

The Harris County Hospital District was created by voter referendum in November 1965 and formalized with taxing authority in January 1966. Its creation followed the publication of Jan de Hartog’s The Hospital, an expose of the conditions at Jefferson Davis Charity Hospital (opened 1924). The District replaced a contentious city-county system in which both were responsible for support of the hospital. Quentin Mease was a founder and chairman of the District.
Lyndon B. Johnson General Hospital opened in 1989. In 1990, emergency facilities at Lyndon B. Johnson and Ben Taub (1963) Hospitals were expanded and Harris County residents began to be assigned to each by ZIP code to better manage caseloads. HCHD was renamed Harris Health System in 2012.

Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2006019371
  • Corporate body

The Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education (SACME) was established April 2, 1976 as the Society of Medical College Directors of Continuing Medical Education (SMCDCME). On July 20, 1998, SMCDCME was re-named to its current title. Note: This Chronology was taken from the SACME website, History page www.sacme.org.

1976 Society established on April 2.

1981 First issue of Mobius published (Lucy Ann Geiselman, editor); Research Committee formed (Harold Paul, chair).

1984 Support of the Research and Development Resource Base in CME (Continuing Medical Education) by the Society (Dave Davis); RICME (Research in Continuing Medical Education) I (David Gullion, Lucy Ann Geiselman, chairs); Training of Society interviewers for "the change study."

1985 Change study interviews total 200.

1986-1988 Search for Society logo.

1986 RICME II (Dave Davis, chair).

1987 First issue of INTERCOM published in January (Harold Paul, Dene Murray, editors); Joint plenary session CME/SMCDCME; highlights of the change study.

1988 RICME III (John Parboosingh, Jocelyn Lockyer, chairs); First Congress on CME (Phil R. Manning, Chair); First honorary member of the Society (Cyril Houle); Title change from Mobius to JCEHP (The Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions) with v. 8 (1); Development of first membership brochure (Harold Paul, Dene Murray and others).

1989 Change study published (Robert Fox, Paul Mazmanian, R.Wayne Putnam, editors); Changing and Learning in the Lives of Physicians; Strategic plan for the Society (George Smith); Membership in the Council of Academic Societies (James Leist, Dale Dauphinee).

1990 First meeting of the "Armadillo Society" (past presidents); RICME IV (Nancy Bennett, chair).

1991 Tri-Group leadership formalized by Alliance for Continuing Medical Education (ACME), Association for Hospital Medical Education (AHME) and SMCDCME; Foundation for research established (James Leist); First Distinguished Service Award (Malcolm Watts).

1992 JCEHP reorganized (James Leist); Third Congress on CME (George Smith, chair); SMCDCME incorporated (George Smith and Robert Kristofco); New JCEHP editor appointed (William Felch); Society home established at AAMC (Brownell Anderson); Position paper presented: The Role of Continuing Medical Education in Academic Health Centers (William Easterling).

1993 Distinguished Service Award (Phil Manning); Research Award (Dave Davis); CME Glossary (Joe D'Angelo); Society listserv established (Robert Bollinger); First Society brochure competition (Susan Duncan); New member orientation established at Spring Meeting (Deborah Holmes).

1994 Distinguished Service Award (Julian S. Reinschmidt); Research Award (Robert Fox); Research Endowment Council established (Brian O'Toole); Task force white paper, The connection between continuing medical education and health care reform (George Smith, Gloria Allington).

1995 Request from AAMC for statement on CME; Reorganization of AAMC's Group on Educational Affairs (GEA), continuing education one of four sections; Pew-Glaxo Working Group on the Future of Academic CME Research Award established (Jocelyn Lockyer, recipient); Distinguished Service Award (Martin Shickman); Report of Society working group on Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) essentials and standards, Future directions for medical college continuing medical education (Arnie Bigbee, chair); Request from ACCME for SACME accreditation surveyors.

1996 Four Society task forces and focus groups address the task force report; Society invited to participate in restructuring of the ACCME.

1997 SMCDCME listserv established by Bob Bollinger.

1998 July 20, SMCDCME re-named the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education (SACME).

1999 SACME Web site created by Bob Bollinger.

Kelsey-Seybold Foundation

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n97078086
  • Corporate body
  • 1951-

Dr. Mavis Kelsey, founder and senior partner of the Kelsey-Seybold Clinic, P.A. of Houston, became acquainted with Dr. William Seybold first at UTMB and then more closely when both were working at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Kelsey, Seybold, and Dr. William Leary discussed the idea of establishing a group practice.
Kelsey moved to Houston in 1949 and started a practice at the Hermann Professional Building. Seybold followed in 1950 and Leary in 1951. The Kelsey-Seybold-Leary Clinic first resided on the fourteenth and eighth floors of the Hermann Professional Building.
Other members of the Kelsey-Leary Clinic were Dr. John R. Kelsey, Jr., Dr. Mavis Kelsey's brother, and Dr. Albert O. Owens, psychiatrist from the Menninger Clinic. Dr. Seybold left the group in 1952 but returned in 1961, serving as Chief of the General and Thoracic Surgery Department. The physicians continued to practice together as the Kelsey-Leary-Seybold Clinic up until 1965, when Dr. Leary left to join the M.D. Anderson Hospital Staff. The Clinic was renamed the KelseySeybold Clinic.
Through the years the Clinic has changed its location, expanded its services, established satellite clinics, operated branches through the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, headed programs for the armed services and has opened the innovative Fitness Center.
In May of 1979, the partnership was converted to a Professional Association. The Kelsey-Seybold, P.A., also organized by the physician staff of the clinic were the Clinic Drugs, Inc., Kelsey-Seybold Leasehold, Medical Equipment Co., Inc. and Professional Supply Company, Inc.
The Kelsey-Seybold Foundation is a chartered, charitable foundation. The Foundation fosters the advancement of medicine by sponsoring medical research and education, especially cancer research and childcare.
The Kelsey-Seybold Clinic provides a diversity of services ranging from specialized, in depth treatment, comprehensive fitness health maintenance programs and the promotion of scientific research.

Hermann Hospital (Houston, Tex.)

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n92089041
  • Corporate body
  • 1925-1999

Hermann Hospital was a public hospital endowed by George Hermann (1843-1914) with a fortune accumulated through investments in oil and real estate. The hospital opened south of downtown Houston in the summer of 1925. It merged with Memorial Hospital in 1999 to create Memorial Hermann Health System. The original Spanish-style building is now part of Children's Memorial Hermann in the northwest corner of the Medical Center.

University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. School of Nursing

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n91091727
  • Corporate body
  • 1972-

The Jane and Robert Cizik School of Nursing at UTHealth opened in 1972 in the Nurses’ Residence at Hermann Hospital as the University of Texas School of Nursing. It was to be the clinical campus of the UT System’s school of nursing, which was based at UTMB in Galveston. It moved into the Hermann Professional Building Annex shortly after, then to the former Prudential Life Building at 1100 Holcombe in 1974. The Houston setting became an official campus of the UT System Schools of Nursing in 1973, alongside Galveston, Austin, San Antonio, El Paso, and Fort Worth/Arlington. The first class graduated in 1974. Also in 1974 the School proposed a Master’s of Nursing degree (the first students would enroll in 1976) and specialized programs in gerontology, oncology, and psychiatric mental health nursing. In 1976, the School of Nursing joined the UT Health Science Center. The school continued to expand, adding specialized courses of study and Doctorate of Nursing degrees. It was renamed the Cizik School of Nursing in 2017.

Children's Nutrition Research Center

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n88669068
  • Corporate body
  • 1978-

The Children’s Nutrition Research Center was created in 1978 as a joint venture among Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children’s Hospital, and the USDA Agricultural Research Service. It is one of six USDA nutritional research centers. The CNRC’s areas of study are nutritional metabolism in mothers, infants, and children; childhood obesity prevention; pediatric clinical nutrition; molecular, cellular, and regulatory aspects of nutrition during development; and developmental determinants of obesity in infants and children.

Greater Houston Dental Society

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n88095511
  • Corporate body
  • 1904

The Greater Houston Dental Society, formerly the Houston District Dental Society, was founded in 1904 and serves as the Houston-area chapter of the Texas Dental Association and the American Dental Association. It seeks to provide public and professional health education.

University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n88044598
  • Corporate body
  • 1944-

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center is named for Monroe Dunaway Anderson who, with his brother-in-law Will Clayton, operated what came to be the biggest cotton company in the world by the earliest years of the Twentieth Century. When he died in 1939, his MD Anderson Foundation received $19 million from his estate. In 1941 when the Texas Legislature set aside $500,000 for a cancer hospital and research center, the Anderson Foundation agreed to match funds if the institution were located in Houston, in the new Texas Medical Center, which was also an Anderson Fund project, and if it were named for their benefactor.
The M.D. Anderson Hospital for Cancer Research at the University of Texas opened in 1944 and operated out of surplus World War II army barracks; the converted mansion The Oaks, of the James A. Baker estate near Rice University; and 46 beds leased from a local hospital (which hospital?) before moving into the original building of its current location in 1954. TMC co-founder R. Lee Clark served as the first full-time director. The world’s first cobalt-60 radiotherapy unit, designed by UTMDA’s Dr. Gilbert H. Fletcher and Dr. Leonard Grimmett, began treating patients in the underground (for safety) clinic on February 22, 1954. The rest of the patients were transferred to the new building three weeks later and the hospital was formally dedicated on October 23. The name was changed to the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute in 1955. The hospital and its capabilities expanded rapidly over the next decades; it installed the first high-voltage Sagittaire linear accelerator for radiation therapy in 1970 and began the US’s first interferon trials in 1978. The name was changed to the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in 1988.

Vinson & Elkins

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n88007234
  • Corporate body

Woman's Hospital of Texas

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n87947718
  • Corporate body
  • 1976-

The Woman’s Hospital of Texas was founded in 1976 and specializes in care focused on the needs of women.

University of Texas Speech and Hearing Institute

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n87117925
  • Corporate body
  • 1951-1992

The University of Texas Speech and Hearing Institute was founded in 1951 as the Houston Speech and Hearing Clinic. It joined the UT system in 1971 and for a year was the Division of Communicative Disorders of the University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston. In October 1972 it was renamed the University of Texas Speech and Hearing Institute at Houston and became part of the UT Health Science Center at Houston. Struggling with reduced state funding, fewer resources for faculty and research, and diminished demand for educational programs, its services were taken over by the United Way of the Texas Gulf Coast and the Institute closed on October 31, 1992.

Menninger Foundation

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n87117731
  • Corporate body
  • 1925-

Charles Fredrick (C. F.) Menninger, MD (also known as Dr. C. F. and CFM), began the Menninger Clinic in 1925. Although not initially a trained psychiatrist, he had an interest in psychiatry and is considered a pioneer in the then-emerging field. Two of his sons specialized in psychiatry at medical school and joined him in operating the clinic. Karl Augustus Menninger, who recently had graduated from medical school, joined him in the clinic late that same year. His son William Claire Menninger, Karl's younger brother, joined the clinic in 1927. Dr. Karl and Dr. Will, as the brothers were known, became leaders in the field. Dr. Karl managed the medical side of the clinic, while Dr. Will managed the finances and administration as the CEO. When Dr. Will died unexpectedly in 1966, Dr. Karl briefly took over as CEO before Dr. Will's son Roy Menninger, MD, known as Dr. Roy, was elected CEO. When Dr. Roy retired in 1993, his younger brother, William Walter (Walt) Menninger, known as Dr. Walt, succeeded him. John McKelvey succeeded Dr. Walt in 2001, and Dr. Walt was named chairman of The Menninger Foundation board of trustees. Menninger moved to Houston in 2003 after it formed an affiliation with The Methodist Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine.

Shriner's Hospital for Crippled Children

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n86842836
  • Corporate body
  • 1920-2021

The Shriners Hospital for Children (Houston) is one of 22 hospitals in the non-profit Shriners network and is affiliated with the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, Baylor College of Medicine, the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, and Scott and White Hospital (based in Temple, Texas). The Houston branch had its origins in the Arabia Temple Crippled Children’s Clinic, which was located at Baptist Sanitarium between 1920 and 1932. The Clinic moved to Methodist Hospital in 1932, occupying its own “Blue Bird Cottage” from 1934 to 1949; the facility was named for its sponsors, Methodist’s Blue Bird Ladies Auxiliary. Between 1949 and 1952 it borrowed space in Hermann Hospital, before reopening in its own building in 1952. It was renamed Shriners Hospital for Crippled Children in 1966. The last building was completed in 1996. In January 2020, Shriners Houston announced that it would close in 2021 and consolidate with the Shriners burn hospital in Galveston.

Texas Nurses Association

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n86833412
  • Corporate body
  • 1907-

Founded in 1907 as the Graduate Nurses’ Association of the State of Texas, to seek state regulation of the education and practice of nurses. In 1909, they convinced the state legislature to pass what was effectively the first nursing practice act, creating the Board of Nurse Examiners for the State of Texas. In 1913, the Association created better standards for nursing schools: Eight-hour days for students, three-year courses of study in all nursing schools, uniform curricula, higher entrance requirements, and better preparation for supervisory and teaching responsibilities. The name was changed to the Texas Nurses’ Association around 1964. The TNA has also worked to create policies for the inspection and accreditation of nursing schools, provide whistleblower protection, create better opportunities for nursing students, right of due process in peer review, and to generally improve the conditions for nurses in the state of Texas.

Greater Houston Hospital Council

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n85812271
  • Corporate body
  • 1970-1997

“An association of hospitals dedicated to helping member hospitals contain costs and provide high-quality healthcare to the citizens of the area” through efficiency studies, shared purchasing, and lobbying.

Texas Medical Center

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n85810360
  • Corporate body
  • 1946-

The Texas Medical Center is a comprehensive medical community located south of downtown Houston. It comprises 54 institutions, including four medical and seven nursing schools, 21 hospitals, three level-I trauma centers [8], eight specialty institutions, and academic and research institutions for many other health-related disciplines[9]. The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center is among the top-ranked cancer hospitals in the country[10]. As of 2017, it is one of the largest medical centers in the world[7].

The Texas Medical Center was proposed by Horace Wilkins, Col. William Bates, and John H. Freeman, the trustees of the M.D. Anderson Foundation. Established by cotton magnate Monroe Dunaway Anderson in 1936[1], the Foundation supported a variety of small causes until Anderson’s death in 1939, at which point the trustees, with the encouragement of Ernst Bertner, M.D., and Frederick Elliott, D.D.S., decided the funds should be used to build a medical center on par with Johns Hopkins and the Mayo Clinic[2]. When, in 1941, the state legislature approved an act to create a cancer hospital[3], the Anderson Foundation trustees secured Houston as the location for the M.D. Anderson Cancer Hospital, which would become first component of the medical center. The Texas Medical Center would be located on a site adjacent to Hermann Hospital, which had opened south of downtown in 1925.

The Texas Medical Center was officially incorporated in 1946 and Bertner was appointed president, replaced at the Cancer Hospital by R. Lee Clark, M.D. The Cancer Hospital was quickly joined by the Dental College, by then affiliated with the University of Texas[16], and Baylor University College of Medicine, which moved from Waco. The Anderson Foundation made grants to Methodist Hospital, Shriners Hospital for Crippled Children, St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital, Texas Children’s Hospital, a new building for Hermann Hospital, and for a library[15].

The Texas Medical Center grew quickly and has provided a home for innovators such as heart surgeons Michael DeBakey and Denton Cooley; William Spencer and his work on rehabilitation of paralysis patients; trauma surgeon and medevac pioneer James “Red” Duke; and Nobel Prize-winning pharmacology researcher Ferid Murad[17].

SOURCES:

[1-5] TMC History 1971
[6] Handbook of Texas Online, Ernst W. Bertner.
[7] Facts and Figures, About Houston, City of Houston, 2017 July 24, www.houstontx.gov/abouthouston/houstonfacts.html
[8] Texas Trauma Facilities, Texas Health and Human Services, Texas Department of Health and Human Services, 2017 July 24, https://www.dshs.texas.gov/emstraumasystems/etrahosp.shtm.
[9] “Texas Medical Center: Houston is where the world comes for treatment”, About Houston, Greater Houston Convention & Visitors Bureau, 2017 July 24, https://www.visithoustontexas.com/about-houston/texas-medical-center/
[10] Institutional profile, Facts and History, 2017 July 24, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, https://www.mdanderson.org/about-md-anderson/facts-history/institutional-profile.html.
[12] Handbook of Texas Online
[13] New York Times, 1994 May 05, online.
[11] Mary Schiflett obituary, Houston Chronicle online, January 19, 2007.
[14] Bryant Boutwell, Ph.D, Bout Time blog, 2014 January 31
[15] TMC History 1971, p178
[16] Handbook of Texas Online, University of Texas Dental Branch
[17] TMC News, 2014 August 19

Howard Hughes Medical Institute

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n85386870
  • Corporate body
  • 1953-

The Howard Hughes Medical Institute was started in 1953 by industrialist and aviator Howard Hughes and the scientists and physicians he consulted as advisors. The Institute funded its own laboratories and research through the Hughes Aircraft Company. After Hughes’ death in 1976, management of the Institute passed to a board of trustees. In 1985, the Aircraft Company was sold to supplement the endowment. Although it originally intended to be a research institution and not a funding source, by this time, HHMI typically employed scientists to conduct biomedical research through laboratories at host institutions, which now number more than 60 nationwide. Since 1987, HHMI has supported graduate students, select professors, and education institutions through its science education program. The Institute began in Miami, Florida but is now located in Chevy Chase, Maryland. Hughes was born in Humble, Texas, and died on a plane en route the Houston’s Methodist Hospital. He is buried in Glenwood Cemetery.

St. Joseph Hospital (Houston, Tex.)

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n85276261
  • Corporate body
  • 1887-

St. Joseph’s Infirmary was established in 1887 by the Sisters of Charity of the Incarnate Word and was originally housed in a frame building at the corner of Caroline and Franklin Streets. A year later, the hospital entered into an agreement with the Harris County Commissioners’ Court to care for Houston’s indigent patients. It became noted for the care it provided during the 1891 smallpox outbreak. A brick building designed by Nicholas J. Clayton was constructed in 1894 but burned soon after, killing two Sisters, when a fire started in a nearby warehouse. Donations by city residents funded a second new building at Crawford and Pierce; the site is now occupied by the Plastic Surgery Institute. A three-story brick building was completed in 1905 and by 1919, when the Bishop Byrne Annex opened (is this the one on the bus route?) the hospital had 350 beds and a wide range of medical and surgical capabilities. Like many hospitals at the time, it had its own nursing school. The maternity hospital was constructed in 1938 with donations from the George Strake family and still stands at (check address). A new hospital wing and convent building were added in 1940. The emergency department treated over 50 victims of 1947 Texas City Disaster. It was the largest hospital complex in the city until the establishment of the Texas Medical Center at the end of the 1940s. Before Texas Children’s Hospital opened in the TMC in 1954, St. Joseph’s pediatric department maintained an affiliation with Baylor College of Medicine. In 2012, a branch was opened on the site of the former Heights Hospital at 1917 Ashland.
Dr. Mavis Kelsey of the Kelsey-Seybold Clinic was on staff in the 1950s. In 1960s plastic surgeon Dr. Thomas Cronin and resident Frank Gerow, working with Dow Corning, developed silicone gel breast implants. The Bloxsom air lock device for resuscitating newborns was developed by pediatrician Allan Bloxsom in 1950, though it fell out of favor by the end of the decade. Herman Barnett, the first African-American graduate of the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston and the first African-American appointee to the Texas State Board of Medical Examiners, finished his anesthesiology residency at St. Joseph’s in 1968 and then joined the medical staff.

University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. School of Allied Health Sciences

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n85248720
  • Corporate body
  • 1973 -

The UTHealth School of Biomedical Informatics began in 1973 as the University of Texas School of Allied Health Sciences. It provided certificate programs in technical arenas to post-bachelor’s students. Disciplines included biomedical communications (audiovisual production in the context of the health sciences); nutrition and dietetics; blood bank technology; histotechnology (preparation of tissue sample slides for examination by pathologists); medical technology to perform laboratory work; nurse anesthesia; perfusion; and cytotechnology (preparing and assisting in the examination of cell slides, as for Pap smears). In 1997 it was reformatted to focus on health informatics, the collection, processing, storage, analysis, interpretation, and retrieval of medical statistics and information.

University of Texas Dental Branch at Houston

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n85224997
  • Corporate body
  • 1905-

The Texas Dental College was established in Houston in 1905. It operated in the upstairs quarters on the north side of Franklin avenue between Main street and Fannin street. In 1925, the dental college built a modern teaching facility at Fannin street and Blodgett avenue. In 1929, the Texas Dental College was re-incorporated as a public trust under the direction of a board of trustees charged with the responsibility of providing quality training in the dental disciplines.

In 1932, Dr. Frederick C. Elliott from the University of Tennessee was brought on to serve as dean of the college. At this time in Houston the depression has cast an economic blight over the land. He was hoping for a freshman class of 30 to 40 but ended up with 11 students registered. Dr. Elliot became active in Chamber of Commerce committee work and, through service on the Educational Committee, pointed to the community’s needs for greatly expanded medical teaching and healing facilities. He developed a “total care” concept, calling for both public and private funds to provide facilities and services to meet the health and medical needs of all the citizens. Dr. Elliott quietly started discussions with Dr. Homer P. Rainey, the president of the University of Texas, and others in the University system, to lay the ground work for affiliation of the dental college with the university, with the dental college to remain in Houston as perhaps a unit in a medical teaching center which Dr. Elliott and Dr. E.W. Bertner sought for the community. On May 13, 1941, harry B. Jewett, chairman of the Chamber of commerce Educational Committee, on which Dr. Elliott then was serving, jumped the gun when he informed the Executive committee that the University of Texas would take over the dental college on September 1, 1941, and operate it as a unit of the University system. The official announcement did not come until August 29, 1942, contingent upon legislative approval and appropriation of state operating funds. The Legislature did approve, and on May 14, 1943, Governor Coke Stevenson signed the bill authorizing the affiliation.

The University took over the dental college as of September 1, 1943 leaving Dr. Elliott as the dean. Later, Dr. Elliott was named vice president of the University System. With the state cancer hospital already assured for Houston, and as further inducement for the University to take over the dental college, the Anderson trustees agreed to provide a site in the proposed medical center for the college and to donate $500,000 towards the cost of a building. In 1946 the Anderson trustees offered to provide an additional $1.5 million to the cancer hospital and the dental college. The two University institutions then approved for location in the medical center on a basis of $1 by the Foundation for each $2 provided by the State of Texas. The dental college trustees, all of whom had been active in seeking the affiliation were: Dr. Walter Henry Scherer, president; Dr. Joseph Phillip Arnold, vice president; Dr. Robert Henry Hooper, secretary; Dr. Paul Veal Ledbetter, Dr. Judson L. Taylor, and Dr. Elliot, ex officio secretary and dean of the college. Legislative approval of the affiliation of the dental college with the University, and appropriation of $109,000 for support of the college, remained to be accomplished in the regular session of the Texas Legislature, which convened early in 1943. Dr. Elliott met with the Chamber of Commerce Executive Committee on February 2,1943, to seek support in the legislature. Dr. Elliott reported to the committee on March 16, 1943, that the Senate and House committees had approved the legislation and complimented Representative Emmett Morse of Houston in handling the bill. A most important factor influencing favorable legislative action was the program embarked upon by the Texas Dental College to train dentist for the Army and Navy. Today the University Of Texas School Of Dentistry occupies handsome quarters in the Texas Medical Center, provided by funds from the State of Texas, the M.D. Anderson Foundation and the Houston Chamber of Commerce.

Institute for Rehabilitation and Research (Houston, Tex.)

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n85028550
  • Corporate body
  • 1951-

The Institute for Rehabilitation and Research was opened by William Spencer, MD, as the Southwestern Poliomyelitis Respiratory Center in 1951 at the peak of the US polio epidemic. It officially became The Texas Institute for Rehabilitation and Research in 1959, then just The Institute for Rehabilitation and Research in 1978. After the development of a vaccine in the early 1960s, Dr. Spencer shifted the practice to the rehabilitation of the catastrophically injured. As it expanded, the Institute recruited doctors who would become major contributors in specific areas of concern, such as Gunyon Harrison (pediatric cystic fibrosis), Carlos Vallbona (physiology and cardiology), Paul Harrington (orthopedic surgeon and developer of Harrington rods); and Bobby Alford (ENT). TIRR is affiliated with Baylor College of Medicine and the McGovern Medical School, and joined Memorial Hermann in 2006.

University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n84075298
  • Corporate body
  • 1972-

The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston is a public health science educational institution. It was created in 1972 by the University of Texas and comprises the UTHealth School of Dentistry (1905), UTHealth School of Biomedical Informatics (1972), the UT MD Anderson Cancer Center UTHealth Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences (1963, renamed 2017), the John P. and Kathrine G. McGovern School of Medicine (1969, renamed 2015), UTHealth School of Public Health (1969), and the Jane and Robert Cizik School of Nursing (1972, renamed 2017). Its teaching hospitals include Children’s Memorial Hermann Hospital, Memorial Hermann-Texas Medical Center, and Harris Health Lyndon B. Johnson Hospital. It also encompasses a long list of smaller centers and institutions that perform work specialized to different illnesses, disciplines, and areas of interest.

Methodist Hospital (Houston, Tex.)

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n84053213
  • Corporate body
  • 1924-0000

Methodist Hospital was established near downtown Houston in 1924. It is currently located on Fannin Street in the Medical Center and serves as the teaching hospital for Baylor College of Medicine.

National League for Nursing

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n83030843
  • Corporate body

In 1952, the name of the National League of Nursing Education was changed to the National League for Nursing, an organization to be composed of: American Association of Industrial Nurses Association of Collegiate Schools of Nursing, National League of Nursing Education, and National Organization for Public Health Nursing, with objectives: to foster development for the improvement of hospital, industrial, public health, and other organized nursing services and of nursing education through the coordinated action of nurses, allied professional groups, citizens, agencies & schools.

Radiation Effects Research Foundation

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n82166445
  • Corporate body
  • 1947-0000

In November 1946, President Harry S. Truman issued a directive authorizing the NAS-NRC to undertake the long-term study of the survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Just prior to Truman's directive, a five-man commission, operating under the auspices of the National Research Council's Division of Medical Sciences and calling itself the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission, had been sent to Japan to conduct a preliminary survey of the situation.
The Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) was officially established under the direction of the Research Council's Division of Medical Sciences in March 1947. The ABCC, which was responsible for carrying out research in the field, was overseen by the division's Committee on Atomic Casualties, which later became the Advisory Committee on ABCC. Operations were funded by the newly created Atomic Energy Commission's Biology and Medicine Division.
The survey findings of the original five-man NAS-NRC commission, communicated in December 1946, made up the ABCC's first report. The first research program proper set up by the ABCC was a hematological study, begun under James V. Neel in March 1947. By 1950, the ABCC had a number of departments in operation, and had established a series of studies that would include research on radiation cataracts, leukemia and other cancers, survivors' aging and mortality rates, sex ratios of survivors' offspring, and genetics.
Logistical and organizational problems of the early ABCC were such that by 1955 it appeared that the program would have to be terminated. Toward the end of 1955, a committee under the direction of NAS Member Thomas Francis was sent to Japan to assess the ABCC and its programs; on the committee's recommendation a new and more effective study program was implemented. By 1957 George B. Darling of Yale University was made director, and it was under his long leadership -- ending only in 1972 -- that the ABCC was able to reorient and stabilize its operations. An Adult Health Study involving biennial examinations of survivors was soon established, followed not long after by new cytogenetic studies. It was also under Darling's leadership that the ABCC instituted bilingual technical protocols and increased the participation of the Japanese National Institute of Health in ABCC studies.
By the early 1970s, constraints imposed by increased operating costs began to make themselves felt. In response to requests that the Japanese Government increase its support of the ABCC, a new, binational private foundation, the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF), was negotiated into existence, and in 1975 it replaced the ABCC while continuing the latter's programs.
[Original description by NAS Archives]

The Japanese Imperial Army and Navy initiated an investigation immediately after the August, 1945 atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Right after the conclusion of the war on August 15, 1945, the Special Commission for Investigating Effects of the Atomic Bomb was established in the academic research council on September 14 of the same year. Greatly influenced by the allied forces, academic research organizations spearheaded investigations in a variety of fields. On the other hand, while U.S. President Harry S. Truman ordered the United States Strategic Bombing Survey (USSBS) to promptly conduct an investigation into the effects of the bombing, on September 4 a U.S. Army medical investigation team held a meeting in Tokyo and met with the Japanese. Against this backdrop, in the same month The Armed Forces Joint Commission for Investigating Effects of the Atomic Bomb in Japan was organized. This Commission finished its investigation in December of that year.
In May, 1946, U.S. Army Colonel Ashley W. Oughterson, one of the leaders of the U.S. military joint investigation team, asked US Army Surgeon General Norman T. Kirk to recommend to the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) - National Research Council (NRC) the planning of continuous research regarding the effects of atomic bombs on the human body. With this, NRC Department of Medical Science (DMS) chair Lewis H. Weed convened a conference of the U.S. Navy, public health authorities, the State Department and the American Cancer Society, and they decided to dispatch to Japan an onsite investigative team of four, Austin M. Brues, Paul S. Henshaw, Melvin A. Block and James V. Neel in October of that year. Also, before that the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) was established as an organ of the federal government in August, 1946 with responsibility for both military and civilian nuclear development in the United States. The AEC took over the functions of the Manhattan Project, which developed the atomic bomb.
In November, 1946, with President Truman approving a long term investigation of atomic bomb injuries, the Committee of Atomic Casualties (CAC) was established in the United States National Research Council medical subcommittee with funding from the AEC, and the first meeting was held in March, 1947 (CAC was later reorganized into the Advisory Committee on ABCC). Also, the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) was established based on the CAC and with a focus on the local investigative team of Austin M. Brues and others, who had already begun their work in Japan. The ABCC started operations temporarily based in the Hiroshima Red Cross Hospital.
While the initial main topics for ABCC were establishing a research system and problems in setting up a laboratory, regarding the former, in June, 1947 ABCC members and Masao Tsuzuki visited the Ministry of Health and Welfare Vaccination Bureau and the National Institute of Health (NIH) to request cooperation. As a result, in January, 1948 the NIH officially decided to participate in the ABCC. Further, in the same month it was decided to use the Ujina Gaisenkan as a research facility (Ujina Laboratory). Then Army Lieutenant Colonel Carl F. Tessmer became the first ABCC director in March, 1948, and that July an ABCC Nagasaki laboratory was established in the Nagasaki Medical College Hospital. In the same month facilities were completed in Kure as well (closed in 1953).
In July 1949, there was an opening ceremony for the Ujina Laboratory and the Kure facility with the participants including Crawford F. Sams, director of the Public Health and Welfare Section and Dr. Harry C. Kelly of the Economic and Scientific Section of General Headquarters, Supreme Commander of the Allied Powers (GHQ / SCAP). While the Ujina Laboratory was a temporary facility, after many twists and turns it was decided to build a permanent laboratory in Hijiyama. Work began in the same month and was completed in November, 1950. The transfer from Ujina Laboratory finished in 1951.
With the preparation of such a research environment, there was a series of investigations and research from 1949, including atomic bomb victim population surveys, leukemia surveys, adult medical surveys, nationwide atomic bomb survivor ancillary surveys in the national census, surveys of children exposed to the atomic bomb in utero and death / cause of death surveys. In September, 1951, the Hiroshima Medical Society and the ABCC held the Meeting to Read Research Papers on the Effects of the Atomic Bomb, and with the cooperation of the Science Council of Japan an ABCC report meeting was held in Tokyo in January, 1952.
In 1955, a special committee of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences National Research Council headed by professor Thomas Francis, Jr. of the University of Michigan reviewed the ABCC’s research, and the subsequent report (the Francis Report) recommended a Comprehensive Research Plan based on a clearly defined fixed group. With this recommendation, in 1957 director George B. Darling reformed the research program, and a system for U.S. – Japan joint research involving such agencies as the NIH was established during his term.
 In July, 1957, a system was established to publicly announce research plans and results. Technical Reports were prepared in both Japanese and English and distributed to ABCC employees, advisors, councils and institutions, governments and related private sector locations. Also, Annual Reports were published bilingually from 1957. There were also efforts to improve preservation and use of materials and data collected in the Japan – U.S. joint research.
Although most ABCC management expenses from its founding were covered by funding from the biomedical program of the AEC, an organ of the American federal government, due to such problems as contributions from Japan and the U.S., and securing employees to provide expert guidance, in the latter half of the 1960s discussion regarding the need to restructure the ABCC emerged. There were also increasing doubts about the U.S. led research system. ABCC restructuring gained the approval of concerned organizations in the U.S., and discussion between Japanese and American governmental authorities took place between 1972 and 1974. As a result, in December, 1974 an agreement was signed that provided for the establishment of a new laboratory as a legally incorporated foundation. In March, 1975 an ABCC scientific reconsideration special committee report was prepared, and the Commission closed on the last day of the month. On April 1, the following day, the Radiation Effects Research Foundation was founded as a new research organization to continue the investigation and research programs of the ABCC with the purpose of establishing a “contribution with peaceful purposes to the health of the human race and the health maintenance and welfare of atomic bomb survivors through the investigation and research into the medical effects of radiation on humans and resulting illnesses.”
[Additional description by JSPS Research Project]

Junior League of Houston Children's Clinic

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n82159045
  • Corporate body
  • 1925-

The Junior League of Houston was founded in 1925 with the purpose of establishing a well-baby clinic for the city’s underserved. By 1927, the clinic was operating out of the First National Bank Building. It would later partner with Hermann Hospital. The clinic moved into Hermann’s outpatient department in 1944, where it served as a training institution for Baylor College of Medicine, and was renamed the Junior League Children’s Health Clinic of Hermann Hospital Outpatient Department. Around this time, the Junior League started a second program to assist patients, not only children, during their hospital stays. The Junior League opened its Diagnostic Clinic associated with Texas Children’s Hospital even before TCH was officially opened in 1954. They began working with new young mothers through the Baylor Teen Clinic in 1974, and donated the SuperKids Pediatric Mobile clinic in 2000 to help improve immunization rates and provide health checks to children whose families have a hard time traveling to a doctor. The Junior League continues to fund-raise and provide volunteer support for dozens of Houston health institutions.

St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital (Houston, Tex.)

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n82127374
  • Corporate body
  • 1945-

St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital opened in 1945 as a private general hospital. It became affiliated with Texas Heart Institute in 1962 and Baylor College of Medicine in 2004. Catholic Health Initiatives acquired it in 2013 and the official name is CHI St. Luke's Health System.

Texas Heart Institute

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n82127251
  • Corporate body
  • 1962-

Dr. Denton A. Cooley, the founder of the Texas Heart Institute, attended the University of Texas and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, where he graduated in 1944. After serving in the Army Medical Corps and studying with Lord Russell Brock in London, he returned to his hometown of Houston, Texas to teach surgery at Baylor College of Medicine in the 1950s. The Texas Heart Institute was founded on August 3, 1962 in order to research and treat cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death in the United States. Among many innovations developed by Cooley and his colleagues at the Institute are the first implantation of an artificial heart, the first successful heart transplant in the United States, advances in treatment of congenital defects, and a number of prostheses and implants. The Institute is part of Texas Medical Center, the largest medical center in the word. CHI St. Luke’s Health – Baylor St. Luke’s Medical Center is the Institute’s clinical partner. [Sources: Texas Heart Institute website; The Houston Review, vol. 2, no. 1, p.16-19]

Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society of North America

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n82058247
  • Corporate body
  • 1938-

Sigma Xi: The Scientific Research Honor Society is a medical honor society, founded in 1886 at Cornell University. Membership is by invitation based on achievements and potential. Sigma Xi supports research grants and other programs in medical and science education. The Rice University/Texas Medical Center chapter was founded in 1938. It was evidently inactive for a few years in the late 1950s and early 1960s until an effort was made in 1962 to revitalize it; the materials in this collection date from around that time forward.

Mayo Foundation

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n82056292
  • Corporate body

National Heart and Blood Vessel Research & Demonstration Center

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n81132742
  • Corporate body
  • 1975-1983

The National Heart and Blood Vessel Research and Demonstration Center was established January 1, 1975, at Baylor College of Medicine, by the National Heart and Lung Institute, National Institutes of Health. The Center existed from 1975 through 1982, and research conducted at the Center resulted in nearly 800 publications.

Texas State Board of Medical Examiners

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n81132557
  • Corporate body
  • 1907-

The Texas Medical Board is the body responsible for regulating medical practitioners in the state of Texas through examination, licensing, setting standards of practice, and, if necessary, disciplinary action. Texas began regulating physicians in 1837 when Dr. Anson Jones, one of the few formally educated physicians in the state, wrote the Medical Practice Act. The Board of Medical Censors tested prospective physicians and granted licenses from 1837 until 1848. A new regulatory law for medical doctors was enacted in 1873 and the Texas State Board of Medical Examiners was formed in 1907. In 1993 the Board expanded to create the Texas State Board of Physician Assistant Examiners and the Texas State Board of Acupuncture Examiners. It was renamed the Texas Medical Board in 2005.

American Rheumatism Association

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n81098863
  • Corporate body

American Rheumatism Association changed its name to American College of Rheumatology in November 1988.

TALON

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n81074028
  • Corporate body

Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center Library

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n81015967
  • Corporate body
  • 1915-

The origins of the library date back to 1915, when the Houston Academy of Medicine (HAM) established a small library in downtown Houston to serve the Harris County Medical Society. This Library was combined with the Baylor College of Medicine’s (BCM’s) small library in 1949 to form a centralized collection. As more institutions joined the Texas Medical Center, they also shared the resources of the TMC Library, thereby creating a unique point of collaboration among the institutions of the TMC.

A permanent home for this new library was built in the early 1950’s, through the efforts of HAM and BCM. Jesse H. Jones contributed funding for the construction, and in 1954, the approximately 27,000 square foot, three-story “Jesse H. Jones Library Building” was dedicated. By 1975, a new addition to the building had added another 76,000 square feet for the Library’s growing collection. At this time, the Library officially became known as the Houston Academy of Medicine – Texas Medical Center Library. Today the library uses the shorter operating name of The TMC Library.

The McGovern Historical Center (MHC) is the rare book and archive department for the library. The earliest acquisition records for the books in the MHC are found in the Houston Academy of Medicine’s (HAM) Library Committee reports for 1935 and 1936. Thirty Fellows of the Academy raised $300 to purchase a collection of 275 French medical books published between 1730 and 1830. In 1949, HAM and Baylor College of Medicine combined their medical libraries. In anticipation of the completion of the Jesse H. Jones Building for the library, the MD Anderson Foundation purchased the rheumatology collection of a New York physician, Dr. Reginald Burbank. This purchase was followed by a gift from the Cora and Webb Mading Foundation of more than 1,000 titles on sanitation and communicable diseases. After the 1954 dedication of the library building, many physicians donated books or historical pamphlets to be stored in a very small, locked room on the second floor. Soon after his arrival in Houston, Dr. McGovern became one of the Library’s most staunch supporters, annually supplying funds for the purchase of rare books and travel support for the librarians to attend meetings of the American Association for the History of Medicine. In 1977, The Library formed a new department with new quarters to collect historical materials and to enhance the rare book collections. In 1982, Dr. McGovern donated his personal collection of rare and historical book to the Library. In 1996 the Library’s Board of Directors named the historical department in his honor.

Rice University

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n80126221
  • Corporate body

University of Texas Medical School at Houston

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n80082446
  • Corporate body
  • 1970-

The University of Texas Medical School at Houston was approved by Governor Preston Smith in 1969. Cheves Smythe, M.D. was appointed the first dean. The first class enrolled in 1970 but was divided among three cities; the first class to complete all its studies in Houston enrolled in 1971. Its John J. Freeman Building was completed in 1972 and the School joined the UT Health Science Center consortium in 1973. The Medical School building sustained serious flood damage in both 1976 and 2001; the damage by Tropical Storm Allison took three years to rebuild. It was renamed the John P. and Kathrine G. McGovern Medical School in 2015 following a gift from the McGovern Foundation.

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