Mostrando 2508 resultados

Registro de autoridad

MacKie and Kamrath

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2009044810
  • Entidad colectiva
  • 1937-

Anderson, Clayton & Co.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no94042115
  • Entidad colectiva
  • 1904-

Formed in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma in 1904.

Vinson & Elkins

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n88007234
  • Entidad colectiva

South Central Academic Medical Libraries Consortium

  • Entidad colectiva
  • 1983-

South Central Academic Medical Libraries (SCAMeL) is a consortium of libraries that serve medical schools. Libraries from Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas make up the group. It was formed in the early 1980s, with bylaws first approved in April 1983.

SCAMeL’s mission is to empower member libraries to better meet the educational, clinical, research, and community engagement priorities of their institutions.

National League for Nursing

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n83030843
  • Entidad colectiva

In 1952, the name of the National League of Nursing Education was changed to the National League for Nursing, an organization to be composed of: American Association of Industrial Nurses Association of Collegiate Schools of Nursing, National League of Nursing Education, and National Organization for Public Health Nursing, with objectives: to foster development for the improvement of hospital, industrial, public health, and other organized nursing services and of nursing education through the coordinated action of nurses, allied professional groups, citizens, agencies & schools.

Moloney, William C.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n98044773
  • Persona
  • 1907-1998

William Curry Moloney was born in Boston Massachusetts on December 19, 1907. He died in 1998.

He studied medicine at Tufts College and graduated in 1932 with a Doctor of Medicine degree. In 1961, he was awarded an honorary Doctorate of Science from the College of the Holy Cross. Dr. Moloney was associated with the Medical School of Tufts University for forty years. He began his career in 1934 as an assistant, then rose to a full professor in 1971 and retired in 1974. Dr. Moloney became Emeritus Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School in 1974- and Emeritus Physician and Chief of the Hematology Division, Peter Bent Brigham Hospital in 1967. He also served concurrent posts: Consultant, Boston Hospitals, 1938-, consultant, Boston City Hospitals, 1948-, director of clinical laboratories.

He is a fellow or member of the following organizations: American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Federation of Clinical Research, American Medical Association, American College of Physicians, Association of American Physicians.

Dr. Moloney served in Japan with the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) as the Chief of the Department of Medicine from 1952-1954. His hematology research at ABCC allowed him to work scientists from many departments.

Dr. Moloney and his wife, Josephine "Jo" (O'Brien) had four children.

Schull, William J.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n85802836
  • Persona
  • 1922-2017

William J. Schull, PhD was an American scientist and geneticist famous for his research into the effects of ionizing radiation on the human body largely based on the atomic bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki after World War II. Dr. Schull began his scientific career in radiation research in 1949 when he joined the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC), established in Japan in 1946 by the United States National Academy of Sciences, National Research Council to study the effects of the bombings in accordance with a presidential directive from Harry S. Truman. From his first post as Head of the Department of Genetics at ABCC, Dr. Schull served many decades in the elite corps of scientists conducting research into the genetic impact of irradiation on human health. A professor emeritus of The Human Genetics Center, School of Public Health, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Texas, Dr. Schull served on most of the major governmental and non-governmental committees formed throughout the 20th century to quantify the effects of ionizing radiation. He helped form the genetics department at the University of Michigan where he served as a professor from 1956 to 1972. As his career progressed, Dr. Schull frequently served in executive positions, chairing many of the governmental committees he served on and becoming a director, 1986-1987 and 1990-1991, and in 1996-1997, vice chairman and chief of research of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF), established in 1975 as the follow-on organization to the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission. Dr. Schull was inducted into the United States National Academy of Sciences in 2001. In affirmation of his long and honorable service to the Japanese people, Dr. Schull received the Order of the Sacred Treasure, Third Class from the Emperor of Japan in 1992.

William Jackson Schull was born on March 17, 1922 to Gertrude Edna (maiden name Davenport) (1900-1938) and Eugene Shull (1896-1975) in Louisiana, Missouri. While Shull is the last name inscribed on his birth certificate, his name was changed to Schull while he was in elementary school. Dr. Schull spent most of his boyhood in Milwaukee, Wisconsin and graduated from that city’s Lincoln High School in 1939. In 1946, Dr. Schull earned a Bachelor of Science in Zoology from Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. In 1947, he earned a Master of Science in Zoology from the same university. He received a Doctor Of Philosophy in Genetics From Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio in 1949. Enlisting in December 1942, Dr. Schull served in the United States Army as a surgical technician with the 37th Infantry Division in the South Pacific until December 1945. In concert with his scientific work, Dr. Schull valued the preservation of the archival historic record and promoted the preservation of the history of the ABCC and RERF throughout his career. He died June 20, 2017, in Houston.

A detailed curriculum vitae is available for Dr. Schull in the control folder for his collection at the McGovern Historical Collection.

Jablon, Seymour

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n87894758
  • Persona
  • 1918-2012

Seymour Jablon was born June 2, 1918, in New York, and died April 9, 2012. He completed a bachelor’s degree at the College of the City of New York in 1939. He earned a Master’s in mathematics and mathematical statistics from Columbia University in 1941. He enlisted in the Army in 1942 until 1946 when he became a statistician for the US Bureau of Labor Statistics. Jablon taught mathematics briefly at Rutgers before taking a job with the National Research Council in Washington, D.C., in 1948. He joined the ABCC in 1955 and was Chief of the Department of Statistics at the ABCC from 1960 to 1963, and 1968 to 1971. He was the associate director at the Medical Follow-up Agency at the National Research Council from 1963 to 1968 and then again from 1971 to 1977.

Lange, R. D. (Robert D.)

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n88639606
  • Persona
  • 1920-1999

Robert Dale Lange was born in Redwood Falls, Minnesota on January 24, 1920. He attended high school at North St. Paul High School in St. Paul, Minnesota. After graduated in 1937 he went to the Macalester College, St. Paul, Minnesota. In 1941 he received his Bachelor of Science. From 1941 to 1944, he studied medicine at Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri. Robert D. Lange received the Jackson Johnson Scholarship all throughout medical school. He was the recipient of the Jackson Johnson Book Prize awarded to the graduating senior with the highest academic average at Washington University Medical School in 1944. Dr. Lange completed an internship in internal medicine at Barnes Hospital, St. Louis, Missouri, 1944-1945. Then Dr. Lange went on to serve as Assistant Resident in Medicine, University of Minnesota Hospital, Minneapolis, 1945-1946. He continued his postgraduate studies as a Fellow and Instructor in Medicine under Dr. C.V. Moore, Division of Hematology, Washington University School of Medicine, 1948-1951.

Dr. Lange served active duty in the United States Army as a Major at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Washington, D.C. He was involved in the active reserves and remains so, 1942-1956, 1956-present. He was promoted to Colonel in 1969, and presently attached to the 489 Civil Affairs Company, Knoxville, Tennessee. Dr. Lange served in the Department of Medicine of the ABCC from 1951-1953. In 1953, he and his family returned to the United States. He immediately joined the academic world. He taught at these medical schools the University of Minnesota, Washington University and the Medical College of Georgia. In 1964, Knoxville, Tennessee became home for the Lange family. There Dr. Lange began his long association with the University of Tennessee. His first appointment was Research Professor at the University of Tennessee Memorial Research Center in 1964. He was promoted to a full professor in 1970. Over the years Dr. Lange accepted a number of chairmanship and directorship appointments with the University's Memorial Research Center and Center for Health Sciences.

Dr. Lange has written extensively in the area of hematology. His bibliography includes: 71 abstracts, 25 book chapters, 156 journal articles. From 1974-1977, Dr. Lange served on the editorial board of Experimental Hematology. He has written reviews for the following premier journals in medicine and the field of hematology: American Journal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology: Archives of Internal Medicine: Biochemical Medicine; Blood, Journal of Hematology: Experimental Hematology: Journal of Clinical Investigation; Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine; New England Journal of Medicine.

Dr. Lange has been a very active faculty member at the University of Tennessee. He has trained thirteen post doctoral fellows and graduate students. Dr. Lange been successful in obtaining grants and other external support for research. Most recently he was awarded $942,513 from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for a ten-year study - "Regulation of erythropoiesis in rats during space flight." Some of the funded organizations have been: National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, American Cancer Society, Atomic Energy Commission, Physicians Medical Education and Research Foundation, John A. Hartford Foundation, Biomedical Research Support, McDonnellDouglas Corporation, and National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

Dr. Lange has been an exchange visitor of the United States Academy of Science since 1968. He has delivered forty lectures to selected hospitals, medical schools, and research institutes throughout the United States and several foreign countries.

The Physicians Recognition Award from the American Medical Association was presented to Dr. Lange in 1969, 1972 and 1979. His honors included membership on Pi Phi Epsilon, Sigma X, Alpha Omega Alpha.

Dr. Lange has been very active as a physician, administrator and professor. He has medical licensure in the state of Tennessee and board certification from the American Board of Internal Medicine. He is a member or fellow in fifteen societies. They are: American Federation of Clinical Research (Emeritus), Society of Experimental Biology and Medicine, Central Society for Clinical Research, Southern Society for Clinical Investigation, American Society of Hematology (Emeritus), International Society of Hematology (Fellow) American College of Physicians (Fellow), Knoxville Society of Internal Medicine, American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Association of University Professors, Knoxville Academy of Medicine, Tennessee Medical Association, American Medical Association, International Society of Experimental Hematology, Society of Research Administrators. Dr. Lange has served on ten committees as a member and officer. These include: Chairman, Southern Blood Club, 1970; Chairman, Erythropoietin Workshop, American Society of Hematology Meeting, 1970, Chairman, National Heart and Lung Institute Erythropoietin Subcommittee of the American Society of Hematology, 1971. Now a member of this committee. A member of the Program Committee, Tennessee regional Meeting, American College of Physicians, 1971. Chairman, Oak Ridge Associated Universities/Oak Ridge National Laboratories Committee on Human Studies, 1975; A member of the UT Hospital's Executive Committee (ex-officio), Bylaws Committee, Graduate Committee, Planning Committee, and Professional Library Services Committee, 1977-; Chairman, Library Committee, Knoxville Academy of Medicine, 1978; Chairman, Human Participation Committee, Oak Ridge Associated Universities and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1978; Member, ad hoc Erythropoietin Committee, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, 1978-present.

Dr. Lange became Professor Emeritus in the Department of Medical Biology College of Medicine, University of Tennessee Medical Center in 1985. He is still on active staff at University Hospital, Knoxville, Tennessee. Mrs. Lange volunteers at a medical library and their son resides in Houston, Texas and daughter in Atlanta, Georgia. In November of 1995 Dr. Lange, Mrs. Lange and their daughter visited the Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center Library. Dr. Lange died March 16, 1999.

Ono, S.

  • Persona

Burbank, Reginald

  • Persona
  • 1888-1972

Reginald Burbank, MD, was born in Pittsfield, Massachusetts on July 26, 1888. Dr. Burbank obtained his medical degree from Cornell Medical College in 1915. Some of the many professional positions he held included: Assistant surgeon New York Orthopedic Hospital (1916-1926); Chief of the Arthritis Clinic at Cornell Medical College (1917-1919); Instructor in Arthritis, chief, arthritis clinic Bellevue Medical College (1916-1926); Consultant on arthritis, Brooklyn Hospital (1926-1956); and Director, arthritis clinic St. Claire’s Hospital 1940-1956). Dr. Burbank dedicated more than fifty years of his life to the study, research, and treatment of arthritis, rheumatism, and gout. Dr. H.J. Hadjopoulos conducted research alongside Dr. Burbank for forty-seven years, and Dr. Hadjopoulos’ name is attached to most of the medical research drafted and published in the manuscripts found within these papers. Dr. Burbank died December 20, 1972, in St. Petersburg, Florida.

Bertner, Ernst William

  • Persona
  • 1889-1950

Dr. Ernst William Bertner was born at Colorado City, Texas, August 18, 1889. After graduating from the local high school and the New Mexico Military Institute at Roswell, New Mexico, he entered the Medical Branch of the University of Texas, Galveston, receiving his MD in 1911.

Following his graduation, he took intern and residency training at the Willard Parker Hospital, Saint Vincent's Hospital and the Manhattan Maternity Hospital, all in New York City. He came to Houston in July, 1913, where he engaged in practice until World War I, when he enlisted in the Medical Corps.

He was assigned to the British Army, and went overseas in July, 1917. In March, 1918, he was transferred to the American Expeditionary Force, and assigned to Headquarters Medical and Surgical Consultants at Newfchateau, France.

Dr. Bertner had a varied and exciting career in France and served actively on most of the front lines. He was wounded by shrapnel and confined to a hospital for a short period of time. He was soon returned to duty. At one time he was caught in one of the famous German pincers movements and was one of the few surviving Medical Officers.

He was discharged from the Army in June, 1919, at Camp Dix, New Jersey with the rank of Major. The following month he resumed his practice in Houston. In May 1921, he went to Baltimore, Maryland, for post-graduate work at Johns Hopkins Hospital, in surgery, gynecology, and urology. He resumed practice in Houston in May 1922, and since that time limited his work to surgery and gynecology.

He was married at St. Louis, November 30, 1922, to Miss Julia Williams, daughter of the late W.E. Williams formerly General Manager of the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railroad in Texas.

Dr. Bertner was always an active member of organized medicine, in the county, state and national organizations and served as seventy-second president of Texas State Medical Association. He served as President of the Harris County Medical Society, President of the Post Graduate Medical Assembly of South Texas, President of the Texas Surgical Society, and President of the Texas Association of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

He was a member of the Executive Committee of the Central Association of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. He was State Counsellor and a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons. He was a member of the American Medical Association, American Urological Association, American Gynecological Association, Central Association of Gynecologists, and Interurban Gynecological Society.

Dr. Bertner was active in hospital organization, having formerly been Chief of Staff of Jefferson Davis Hospital in Houston, and very active in building the first unit of that institution. Later, he became identified with Hermann Hospital and did much towards the development of the institution, where he served as Chief of Staff. He was also on the Surgical Staff of Memorial Hospital and Southern Pacific Hospital in Houston.

He served as Vice-Chairman of the Houston Board of Health and Executive Committeeman of the Texas Social Hygiene Association. He was a member of the First Presbyterian Church in Houston, a 32nd degree Mason, Knight Templar, Shriner and Knight Commander of the Court of Honor of the Scottish Rite, and a member of the Houston Club, Ramada Club, and Houston Country Club.

Dr. Bertner was one of the founders of the Texas Medical Center and was its first president from 1945-1950. He was named by the University of Texas as acting director of the M.D. Anderson Hospital for Cancer Research when that institution was conceived. He was responsible for the professional organization and the operation of the hospital for the first four years of its existence. He served as professor and chairman of the department of gynecology for the Baylor College of Medicine since its establishment in Houston from 1943 until his death in 1950.

During World War II he was in command of the Emergency Medical Service of the Office of Civilian Defense, and received a Presidential Citation for this service.

Dr. Bertner was a past Vice-President of the American Cancer Society and served on its Board for several years. He was chairman of the Executive Committee of the Texas Division and received the American Cancer Society award for distinguished service in cancer control in 1949. He was a member of the Board of Directors of the Houston Chamber of Commerce. He was a member of the Citizen's Committee for Reorganization of the Executive Branch of the Government, an outgrowth of the Hoover Commission Report.

Dr. Bertner died July 28, 1950 in Houston following a two year battle with cancer. He was survived by his wife, Julia Williams Bertner, two sisters and a niece.

Karnaky, Karl John, 1907-1988

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2003070674
  • Persona
  • 1907-1988

Karl Karnaky was born November 7, 1907, in Barham, Louisiana and died May 29, 1988, in Houston, Texas. His parents were from Germany and Austria-Hungary. Karnaky graduated in pre-medicine from Rice University (then the Rice Institute) in 1930 and went on to study medicine at UTMB. He registered for the draft in 1940; he was working out of the Medical Arts Building at the time. In 1940, he treated a five-year-old Houston girl for tumor-induced precocious puberty; the case was compared to that of Lina Medina, a Peruvian girl who gave birth at age five. He taught at Baylor College of Medicine in the late 1940s. He was the director of Menstrual Disorder Clinic at Jefferson Davis and was on staff at Hermann, Park View, Heights, St. Joseph’s, Memorial, and Methodist Hospitals. In the 1960s and 1970s he worked at the Obstetrical and Gynecological Research Institute [and Foundation], Houston.

Macon, N. Don

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n95019842
  • Persona

Hamilton, Howard B.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2005037463
  • Persona
  • 1918-2007

Dr. Howard Beye Hamilton was born in Oak Park Illinois on December 4, 1918. He graduated from the University of Rochester in New York in 1941 and from Yale University School of Medicine in 1945. Hamilton served in the United States Navy from 1942-1945, during World War II. In the late 1940s and early 1950s Hamilton conducted research at Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard University, the Long Island School of Medicine, the New York College of Surgeons, and the University of Tokyo in Japan.

In 1956 Dr. Hamilton moved to Hiroshima, Japan, where he lived for the next thirty years. After his move to Japan, Hamilton served as the Chief of Clinical Laboratories for the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) from 1956 until its dissolution in 1975. Hamilton worked in the same capacity for the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF), which succeeded the ABCC, until 1984. Between 1984 and 1986 Dr. Hamilton began transitioning into retirement; he continued to work as a consultant for the RERF during this time.

Dr. Hamilton was a consummate scholar and published extensively thoughout his career. Hamilton published papers on topics including endocrinology, steroid chemistry, enzyme kinetics, hemoglobinopathies, the structure and function of hemoglobin, genetic polymorphisms, biochemical genetics, the long term after-effects of exposure to ionizing radiation, and epidemiology of cardio-vascular disease.

Dr. Hamilton's hobbies included playing tennis and practicing the Japanese theatrical art of Noh, which features dramatic masks and carefully defined movements. After his retirement, Dr. Hamilton catalogued Noh and Kabuki works and published Noh plays. In some circles, Dr. Hamilton was known as much for his enthusiastic patronage and participation in Noh as he was for his work with the ABCC and RERF. (Source: Washington Post, May 9, 2007)

Dr. Hamilton died on May 9, 2007 at his home in Falls Church, Virginia. He was 88 years old.

Matney, Thomas

  • Persona
  • 1928-2010

“Dr. Thomas S. Matney was a Houston philanthropist and emeritus professor of genetics and environmental science at The University of Texas Health Science Center and M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences. Professor Matney made important contributions to scientific understanding of cancer-causing agents and the genetic mechanisms that underlie the development of cancer. His wide-ranging philanthropic and service activities enhanced the well-being of hundreds of Houston-area children and families."

Thomas Stull Matney was born on September 21, 1928, in Kansas City, Missouri but his family moved to Texas when he was ten. He earned a bachelor's and Master's from Trinity University in San Antonio and a Ph.D. in bacteriology from the University of Texas, Austin. In the 1950s, Matney served as a Captain and then a civilian Medical Bacteriologist in the U.S. Army Chemical Corps at Fort Detrick, Maryland. He moved to Houston in September 1962 to take a position at M.D. Anderson Cancer Hospital. He later became the first dean of the University of Texas Graduate School of BIomedical Sciences

Thomas Stull Matney was born on September 21, 1928, in Kansas City, Missouri. His family moved to Texas when he was 10 years old. He received bachelor's and master's degrees in biology and chemistry from Trinity University in San Antonio, and the Ph.D. degree in bacteriology from the University of Texas at Austin.

In the 1950s, Matney served as Captain and later civilian Medical Bacteriologist in the U.S. Army Chemical Corps in Fort Detrick, Maryland where he developed protections for chemical and biological weaponry. Dr. Matney moved to Houston to join the Biology Department of the M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute in September of 1962. He became the first associate dean of the newly formed UT Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences and a Distinguished Professor Emeritus. He was also a member of M. D. Anderson Steering Committee for Alumni and Faculty.

Dr. Matney was a generous supporter of the University and mentor to many graduate students. He personally financially supported students studying at the UT-Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences. He established endowments of The Thomas Stull Matney Professorship in Cancer Genetics and The Thomas Stull Matney Professorship in Environmental and Genetic Sciences, both to support scientific excellence and service to graduate education.

He was married to Glenda Matney nee Oglesby until her death in 1990 and had three children with her. He remarried Nancy Lee Matney.

Dr. Matney's community service activities focused primarily on the well-being of at-risk children. He served as a consultant to the City of Houston Parks and Recreation Department about problems concerned with violence prevention in children. He was a Trustee and raised millions of dollars for Hospitality Apartments, which provides affordable housing for those undergoing long term medical treatment in Houston.

Dr. Matney was a past president of Emerson Unitarian Universalist Church, in Houston. He was also a Past President of the Houston Chapter of National Train Passenger Association as well as other national and local rail road organizations.

Dr. Matney died at the age of 82 on November 28, 2010 after an extended illness.” (1)


  1. “Thomas Matney Obituary,” Houston Chronicle (Houston, TX) December 5, 2010

Smythe, Cheves M.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n89664729
  • Persona
  • 1924-2020

Cheves McCord Smythe was born in Charleston, South Carolina in 1924. He was born into a well-established South Carolina family. Smythe received his undergraduate degree from Yale College in 1943, and his medical degree in 1947 from Harvard Medical School. He completed his internship and residency at the Boston City Hospital. Next, he served as a Research Fellow at the Presbyterian Hospital in New York. Following this, he returned to the Boston City Hospital as a Chief Resident. From 1942-1966, Smythe served in the U.S. Naval Reserve. He was a part of the Medical Corps and became a Lieutenant Commander. He retired from the Naval Reserve in 1966. Beginning in 1955, Smythe started as an Instructor in Medicine at the Medical College of South Carolina. He eventually becoming an Assistant Professor of Medicine and finally Dean. He remained as Dean from 1963 until his departure in 1966. The following four years he served as Assistant Director and Director of the Department of Academic Affairs at the Association of American Medical Colleges. The bulk of his career was spent at The University of Texas Medical School at Houston, where he became the first dean of the school in 1970. He would remain as dean until 1975. Smythe continued his profession at the university until 1995, serving as Professor, Adjunct Professor, and Dean Pro Tem. Smythe continued his career abroad when he became the Dean at the Aga Khan University in Karachi, Pakistan. He served in this role from 1982 to 1985. His involvement with the school continued, and he returned as Professor and Chairman of the Department of Medicine from 1990 to 1991. Smythe had many hospital appointments including the Hermann Hospital, Memorial Southwest Hospital, and the LBJ Hospital. He was also a member of many medical organizations and received many honors and awards. In addition, he was the author of numerous publications. For a complete list of accomplishments please visit Smythe’s vitae and bibliography.

Dr. Smythe died May 11, 2020, in Charleston, South Carolina.

Kahn, Eugen

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/nr98011627
  • Persona
  • 1887-1973

Dr. Eugen Kahn was born in Stuttgart, Germany, on May 20, 1887. He was educated at Heidelberg, Berlin, and then at Munich, receiving his MD in 1911. He spent the next 18 years in Munich as an assistant and associate on the staff of the Psychiatric Clinic, in close association with Dr. Emil Kraepelin.

In 1930 Dr. Kahn went to Yale University, where he served not only as Sterling Professor of Psychiatry and Mental Hygiene but as Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry until 1946. He also served as Psychiatrist-in-Chief of the New Haven Hospital.

Dr. Kahn then moved to Switzerland, where he remained until 1951. In that year he returned to America, coming to Baylor College of Medicine in Houston Texas to serve on the full-time staff of the Department of Psychiatry as a Professor until 1962; for one of those years he served as Acting Chairman of the Department. After 1962 he was Professor Emeritus at Baylor. During his 22 years in Houston, Dr. Kahn was a research associate in psychiatry at the Houston State Psychiatric Institute (Texas Research Institute of Mental Sciences/ University of Texas Mental Sciences Institute) and a consultant in psychiatry at the Veterans Administration Hospital.

Dr. Kahn's entire career was spent in teaching, research, and scholarly activities. He read and wrote on a broad range of topics. He published at least 120 papers, hundreds of book reviews, and four books, the best know of which is Psychopathic Personalities. The last book, The Past Is Not Past, was published in 1962.

Adapted from American Journal of Psychiatry 130:7, 822, July 1973.

Renfert, Henry

  • Persona
  • 1920-2003

Dr. Henry Renfert, Jr. was born May 5, 1920 in Fort Worth, Texas, to German immigrant Heinrich Renfert and his wife, Wisconsin native Wanda Stresau. He had an older brother and sister, Frederic and Wandy, and a twin sister, Melita. His childhood was spent mostly in Galveston but his parents sent him to Wisconsin to attend high school at the Milwaukee Country Day School (1934-1937). He graduated from Cornell University in 1941. He earned his M.D. from Cornell University Medical College in 1944 and interned at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.

He served as medical officer in 1944-1945 aboard the U.S.S Hydrus and U.S.S. Independence; during this time, the Independence was assigned to atomic bomb experiments on Bikini Atoll. He completed his residency training in internal medicine at the University of Michigan before returning to the Navy to serve as Senior Medical Officer at the U.S. Navy Infirmary in Sasabo, Japan. He was awarded both a Naval commendation medal for the success of his program to control communicable diseases at the Sasabo base, and a Navy Reserve medal for ten years of service to the Navy.

Upon returning the United States, he spent a year as an assistant professor at Ann Arbor and then returned to his home state to go into private practice in Austin. He was joined by Dr. Virgil Lawless in 1956 and went on to found the Austin Diagnostic Clinic; their dream was to build a smaller form of the Mayo Clinic in Central Texas. In 1958, Dr. Renfert returned to Cornell as Associate Dean and Assistant Professor of Medicine, staying two years before returning to Austin to rejoin the Austin Diagnostic Clinic. The Austin Diagnostic Clinic was the first clinic in Austin to provide in-house radiology and laboratory testing, as well as the first to supply its own specialists in many different fields. It eventually grew into the Austin Diagnostic Medical Center, with a hospital and over 130 doctors. Today, it is called the Austin Medical Center and has several branches.

Dr. Renfert died in Austin on January 5, 2003. He was cremated and his ashes scattered in Hitchcock, north of Galveston.

Dr. Renfert was also an avid collector of railroad china and donated his collection, thought to be the largest in the United States, to the Gulf Coast Railroad Museum in Galveston in 1991.

Bickel, Laura C.

  • Persona
  • 1912-1977

Laural Carnell Bickel was born in Shamokin, Pennsylvania, on June 2, 1912. She was educated at University of Wisconsin Medical School, (now the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health) and moved to Houston in the early 1940s. She was a pediatrician and did considerable work in both rubella and in congenital diseases. Dr. Bickel died in Houston on December 15, 1977.

Kit, Saul

  • Persona
  • 1920-2008

Dr. Saul Kit (November 25, 1920 - January 24, 2008) was a leader in biochemistry in the Texas Medical Center. He was chief of the section of nucleoprotein metabolism in the Department of Biochemistry at M.D. Anderson Hospital, and later Head of the Division of Biochemical Virology at Baylor College of Medicine. He served as President of the Southwest Section of the American Association for Cancer Researchers, the Treasurer of the American Society for Cell Biology, and President of the American Society for Cell Biology. Dr. Kit was a recipient of numerous research grants from National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, The American Cancer Society, Leukemia Society, Robert A. Welch Foundation, and the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis. For over 25 years he received a Research Career Award from the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. In 1987, he was honored with the Distinguished Inventor of the Year Award for developing the world's first genetically engineered vaccine to be licensed by the U.S. government. Dr. Kit was granted numerous United States and International patents for his pioneering vaccine inventions.

Barkley, Howard T.

  • Persona
  • 1901-1981

Howard T. Barkley, Sr. was born in Tucson, AZ on November 30, 1901. He graduated from the University of Arizona in 1931 with his Bachelor's degree and the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons with a MD in 1935. He first served as an intern at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York before going to the Presbyterian Hospital, also of New York, to serve as a surgical resident. He received further training at the University of Michigan Hospital in Ann Arbor before moving permanetnly to Houston, TX in 1941.

During World War II he served as a flight surgeon for the United States Army Air Corps, reaching the rank of lieutenant colonel. He was an associate of professor of clinical surgery at Baylor College of Medicine from 1943-1980 and chief of thoracic surgery at MD Anderson Hospital from 1944-1968. Barkley also served on the staff of Hermann Hospital in Houston from 1942 to 1972, and as chief of thoracic surgery there from 1944-1968. In 1948 he was appointed chairman of the medical staff at Houston AntiTubercular Clinic. Barkley served in a variety of capacities for different regional medical organizations. Barkley served as president of the Houston Surgical Society in 1952, the Texas Tuberculosis Association from 1956-1958, the Harris County Medical Society in 1967, and the Houston chapter of the American Tuberculosis Association. He served as vice president of the National Tuberculosis Association in 1963-1964. He was a founding member of the American Association of Thoracic Surgery in 1948 and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons in 1964.

Howard T. Barkley died on January 26, 1981.

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