Showing 1147 results

Authority record

ABAA KAKEN

  • Corporate body
  • 2016

The ABAA KAKEN group was began by Professor Masahito Ando, a renowned expert in Archival Science in Japan. The group completed a Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) grant-in-aid research project titled "The Study on Developing Of A Digital Archive Relating To Atomic-Bomb Radiation Effect On The Human Body." The ultimate goal was to build a digital archive of Atomic-Bomb related documents. TMC Library with its unique collection of personal papers of ABCC -related scientists is a core member of the international part of the project and also a partner in international collaborative effort to make digitized documents available online for researchers around the world. The TMC Library agreed to preserve the work product of the group for posterity.

Able, Luke William

  • Person
  • 1912-2006

Luke William Able was born August 2, 1912 in Port Arthur, Texas, and his family moved to Houston when he was six. He earned his Bachelor’s from the University of Texas in 1933 and his MD from UTMB in 1940. He enlisted in 1942 while he was an intern at Hermann Hospital. Able survived a kamikaze attack on the USS Aulick in Leyte Gulf in the Pacific Theater on November 19, 1944. He suffered a shattered leg and other injuries but directed the treatment of wounded until he passed out from his own injuries. He was awarded a Silver Star and a Purple Heart and spent two years in the hospital recovering.
After the war, he trained at Children’s Hospital in Boston. He was head of the surgery department of Texas Children’s Hospital from 1954 to 1987. In 1964, he participated in one of the early separations of conjoined twins in Texas.
Dr. Able retired in 1988 due to complications from his World War II wounds. He died March 16, 2006 in Franklin, North Carolina.

Aday, Lu Ann

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n79107852
  • Person
  • 1946-

Lu Ann Aday was born in Waxahachie, Texas, on August 19, 1946. She earned her bachelor’s degree in agricultural economics in 1968 from Texas Tech University and then went to Purdue University for a Master’s in 1970 and then, in 1973, a doctorate in sociology. She was the associate director of the Center for Health Administration Studies at the University of Chicago before teaching at the University of Texas School of Public Health.

ALTRUSA

  • Corporate body

American Medical Informatics Association Nursing Informatics History Project

  • Corporate body
  • 2008 -

The American Medical Informatics Association Nursing Informatics History Project is an offshoot of the nursing informatics archive started at the National Library of Medicine by Dr. Virginia Saba in 1997. The project launched in 2008 as an endeavor to document what nursing informatics means, its history and future, and people and events that shaped the discipline. There are video interviews of important figures in nursing informatics that can be viewed through the AMIA website. There is also a list of relevant articles on the AMIA website but the articles are noted to be available at the Texas Medical Center Library. The American Nursing Association recognized nursing informatics as a new specialty in 1991.

Anderson, Raymond C.

  • Person
  • 1918-2008

Dr. Ray C. Anderson, MD, Ph.D, was born in Duluth, Minnesota in about 1918. He attended Gustavus Adolphus College where his undergraduate mentor Dr. J. Alfred Elson "helped him obtain a teaching assistant position at the University of Minnesota in the lab of Dr. C.P. Oliver, a leading geneticist. Anderson went on to complete his Ph.D. in Zoology (Genetics). Oliver encouraged him to apply to medical school to study the burgeoning field of medical genetics" (University of Minnesota, College of Biological Sciences: Biography, Spring 2008.)In 1946 Anderson recieved his medical degree from the University of Mainnesota, ranked first in his class.

After receiving his medical degree, Anderson accepted an internship at the University of Michigan Genetics Institute, where he met Dr. James Neel. In 1947 Dr. Anderson was obligated to enlist in the U.S. Army as a Medical Officer. In this capacity Dr. Anderson was asked by Dr. Neel if he would like to participate in a genetic study of survivors of the atomic bomb blast in Hiroshima, Japan. Dr. Anderson was very interested in this research, and in November 1947 Anderson traveled to Japan to join the research team at the newly-formed Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission.

Anderson remained with the ABCC for two years. During this time he worked closely, though not always harmoniously, with Dr. Neel. Anderson contributed to a number of studies of the health of the survivors and children of the survivors of the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

In 1949 Ray Anderson returned to the United States, where he gravitated towards the field of pediatric cardiology. He enjoyed a long and successful career in cardiology, and was a member of the surgical team at the University of Minnesota that preformed the very first open heart surgery. He published over 135 articles over the course of his career.

Dr. Ray Anderson enjoyed a long and distinguished medical career that spanned a number of years. The collection at the John P. McGovern Historical Collections and Research Center focuses on the brief period of Dr. Anderson's career from 1947 to 1949, when he worked with the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission.

Dr. Ray Anderson died May 20, 2008 in Sun City, Arizona, where he lived part of the year after his retirement from medicine in 1980.

Andrews, Billy

  • Person
  • 1956-

ertified Medical Illustrator William M. Andrews was born July 4, 1956, in Chicago, Illinois, into an Air Force family, and grew up in California, Texas, Oklahoma, and Hawaii. He earned a Bachelor’s in art from the University of Texas at Austin in 1978 and a Master’s in Biomedical Communications from the University of Texas Health Science Center at Dallas in 1980. He began his career in Tucson as a medical illustrator for the University of Arizona Health Science Center. In 1981, he moved to Houston, where he has served several institutions within the Texas Medical Center, including the Texas Heart Institute and UT MD Anderson Cancer Center. He received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Association of Medical Illustrators in 2018. At this time (2020) he has been with the Augusta University Medical College of Georgia since 1999 and is pursuing a Ph.D. in Health Promotion, Education, and Behavior through the University of South Carolina, Columbia.

Andrews, Tom A.

  • Person
  • 1903-1977

Urologist Tom Adam Andrews. Jr., was born November 26, 1903 in West Point (near La Grange), Fayette County, Texas to Tom A., Sr., and Augusta “Gussie” Rabb Andrews.. He married Helen sometime before 1930 and served in the Navy Medical Corps during World War II. He died on October 16, 1977, in Houston and is buried at Forest Park Cemetery. Note: He is listed in various places online as “Jr.” but at least one source gives his father’s middle name as Adolphus, not Adam. His older son was also Thomas Adam (1930-1991).

Armstrong, John T.

  • Person
  • 1912-1999

Dr. Armstrong is mainly associated with his involvement with Houston Hermann Hospital, The Houston Academy of Medicine, the Texas Medical Center, the Texas Medical Center Library, and has been published in the Southern Medical Journal, Journal of the Southern Medical Association. John T. Armstrong served on various committees at the Houston Academy of Medicine, where he served such appointments as president. Dr. Armstrong was heavily involved in the field of obstetrics and gynecology. His records include: his professional correspondence; his medical publications; family papers; professional diaries and ledgers; and his affiliated medical organizations’ publications.
Possibly 1912-1989, buried in Brookside Cemetery, Houston. Possible WWII military service.

Arnett, Frank C.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no98075898
  • Person
  • 1942-

Frank Couchman Arnett, Jr., was born in Salyersville, Kentucky, in 1942. He earned his M.D. from the University of Cincinnati in 1968 and then pursued internal medicine residency and rheumatology training in the 1970s at The Johns Hopkins University (JHU) School of Medicine, followed by a faculty position at JHU for 10 years.

Dr. Arnett came to the University of Texas Medical School in 1984 to become Professor of Medcine and Director of the Division of Rheumatology, a position he held until he became Chairman of the Department of Internal Medicine in 2001-2004. He served as the chief of various medical services at Memorial Hermann and The Lyndon B. Johnson Hospitals in Houston.

Dr. Arnett is internationally known as a clinician, teacher and clinical investigator. He was elected to the Association of American Physicians in 1993 and the Johns Hopkins Society of Scholars in 1995. He served on the Board of Directors of national Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society for 9 years and was national president of AOA in 1996. He also served on the American Board of Internal Medicine from 1988-1994. In 1997 he became director of the first NIH-NIAMS Specialized Centers of Research in Scleroderma, the longest continually funded SCOR in scleroderma in the nation (1997-2006).

Dr. Arnett was Co-Chairman of the Sjogren's Syndrome Study Group of the American College of Rheumatology in 1990-1991.

In 2006, he led the effort to successfully compete for one of the first 12 Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) funded by NIH/NCRR and formerly served as Principal Investigator and Executive Director of that new program, as well as the first NIH Center of Research Translation (CORT) in Scleroderma.

Dr. Arnett chaired or served on a long list of committees. He has been an invited speaker all over the world. He received numerous awards for his work, including the University of Texas Health Science Center's highest award, the President's Scholar Award for Teaching in 2005 and for Research in 2008.

Dr. Arnett was a founding member of the University of Texas Academy of Health Education Sciences and, in 2007, was elected a Master of the American College of Physicians. He has been named to both Top Doctors and Best Doctors in America since 2000.

Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission

  • Corporate body
  • 1946-1975

The Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) was formed after the bombings on Hiroshima and Nagasaki on August 6 and August 9, 1945. On November 18, 1946, President Harry Truman authorized the National Research Council to establish the organization “to undertake long range, continuing study of the biological and medical effects of the atomic bomb on man.” Key members of the ABCC included Lewis Weed, Austin M. Brues and Paul Henshaw, physicians from the National Research Council, and Army representatives Melvin A. Block, and James V. Neel. By the time the ABCC arrived in Japan on November 24, 1946, the Japanese had already started studying the effects on both immediate and delayed atomic bomb damage in survivors. Masao Tsuzuki was the leading Japanese authority on the biological effects of radiation and determined the different types of damage caused by the bombs and the effects on the human body.

By 1951, the ABCC had 1063 employees, 143 allied and 920 Japanese. The most important contribution of the ABCC was the genetics study which focused on the long-term effects of radiation exposure on pregnant women and their unborn children. The study also looked at the effects of radiation on survivors and their children. The ABCC did not actually treat the survivors that they studied, but it did give the survivors an opportunity to receive several medical checkups each year.

By the mid-1950s, trust in the ABCC was declining. The Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) had threatened to stop funding in 1951, but James Neel managed to convince them to continue funding for another three years. In 1956 Neel and William J. Schull published their final draft of The Effect of Exposure to the Atomic Bombs on Pregnancy Termination in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Over time, the ABCC would become the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF). The RERF was officially establish on April 1, 1975 and is a binational organization run by both the United States and Japan to this day.

This information was taken from the Radiation Effects Research Foundation website at http://www.rerf.jp/glossary_e/abcc.htm and from the donor cards of the collection located in the The John P. McGovern Historical Collections and Research Center.

Autrey, A. M., Jr.

  • Person
  • 1899-1983

Adam Manuel Autrey, Jr., was born October 31, 1899 and died June 17, 1983; he is buried in Forest Park Cemetery in Houston.

Autrey, A.M., Sr.

  • Person
  • 1863-1935

Dr. A.M. Autrey, Sr., was an eye, ear, nose, and throat specialist. He was born October 4, 1863, in Veracruz, Mexico. He died December 28, 1935, in Houston and is buried at Forest Park Cemetery.

Baird, Valliant Clinton

  • Person
  • 1904-1986

Valliant C. Baird MD, contributed to the organization of industrial health programs during their nascent years.

Dr. Baird was born September 28, 1904 in Pancake/Gatesville TX. He received his BS. in Pre—Med from Tulane University in 1925 having been a member of the Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor Society and Theta Kappa Psi Medical Fraternity. He was a 1928 graduate of Tulane in New Orleans, Louisiana. Dr. Baird served his internship and residency at the Mercy and Charity Hospitals in New Orleans from 1933 to 1934 He then spent some time as an oilfield physician.

Upon coming to Houston, he established his career in Industrial Medicine and as an Oilfield physician for 39 years with Humble Oil and Refining Company (currently known as Exxon Mobil). His roles include assistant chief physician in 1935 and chief physician in 1944. Dr. Baird also served as Professor of Occupational Medicine at the University Of Texas School Of Public Health in Houston and as Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine Clinical Associate Professor of Industrial Medicine in the Department of Virology and Epidemiology at Baylor School of Medicine in Houston. Dr. Baird was also President of Medical Research Foundation of Texas in 1960-61.

Papers include Dr. Baird’s resume up until 1963, the biography proof of what was published in who’s who in America, 37th Edition., newspaper clippings, medical journal articles, meeting and conference presentation notes and summaries, and pamphlets; all papers are related to either or both 1) honors and awards in the Oil and Gas Industry in particular as Chief Physician for Humble Oil and Refining Company (currently known as Exxon Mobile); and 2) industrial medicine specific to promoting physical and mental health well-being for employees and their families, which is often referred to as the Hygiene Program; the program discusses the importance of both personal and environmental hygiene.

Dr. Baird’s publications discuss the following topics: Chemical Hazards – Industry, Farm, and Home, Suicide, Paget’s disease, Coronary Artery Disease, Preventive Medicine correlates to specific age groups, plan of organization of an industrial health program, advocated pre-employment examinations, carotid sinus syndrome.

Bangs, Jack; Bangs, Tina

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n80109545
  • Person
  • 1913-1999

Tina Engdahl Bangs was born December 31, 1915 in Spokane, Washington and died in Houston on September 21, 1999. John Leslie “Jack” Bangs was born September 3, 1913 in Minot, North Dakota and died May 2, 1971. Jack served in the Navy during World War II; they are both buried in the Houston National Cemetery. They were recruited to Houston in 1951 to open a speech and hearing clinic in space donated by Methodist Hospital. The new building for the Houston Speech and Hearing Center Clinical Services opened in 1959 and was tripled in size in 1969 by the addition of a research building.

Barkley, Howard T.

  • Person
  • 1901-1981

Howard T. Barkley, Sr. was born in Tucson, AZ on November 30, 1901. He graduated from the University of Arizona in 1931 with his Bachelor's degree and the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons with a MD in 1935. He first served as an intern at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York before going to the Presbyterian Hospital, also of New York, to serve as a surgical resident. He received further training at the University of Michigan Hospital in Ann Arbor before moving permanetnly to Houston, TX in 1941.

During World War II he served as a flight surgeon for the United States Army Air Corps, reaching the rank of lieutenant colonel. He was an associate of professor of clinical surgery at Baylor College of Medicine from 1943-1980 and chief of thoracic surgery at MD Anderson Hospital from 1944-1968. Barkley also served on the staff of Hermann Hospital in Houston from 1942 to 1972, and as chief of thoracic surgery there from 1944-1968. In 1948 he was appointed chairman of the medical staff at Houston AntiTubercular Clinic. Barkley served in a variety of capacities for different regional medical organizations. Barkley served as president of the Houston Surgical Society in 1952, the Texas Tuberculosis Association from 1956-1958, the Harris County Medical Society in 1967, and the Houston chapter of the American Tuberculosis Association. He served as vice president of the National Tuberculosis Association in 1963-1964. He was a founding member of the American Association of Thoracic Surgery in 1948 and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons in 1964.

Howard T. Barkley died on January 26, 1981.

Barkley, James E.

  • Person
  • 1925-2014

James Earl Barkley, Jr., was born January 21, 1925, in Uhrichsville, Ohio. He served in Europe and Asia during World War II and was assigned for awhile to the pharmacy at Camp Cooke in Los Angeles, California. He obtained a pharmacy degree from Ohio State University in 1951 and began working for Burroughs Wellcome. He was transferred to Houston in 1961. Barkley spent five years in Washington, DC, between 1962 and 1967, but then returned to Houston. He died on March 20, 2014 and is buried at Forest Park Westheimer Cemetery.
Henry Solomon Wellcome was born August 21, 1853, in a log cabin near what would later become Almond, Wisconsin. He and Silas Mainville Burroughs formed Burroughs, Wellcome, & Co. in 1880. In 1884, they introduced to England the idea of selling medications in tablet form instead of the usual powders or liquids. They also pioneered direct marketing to doctors. Burroughs died in 1895 but the company did well under Wellcome’s direction. Wellcome became a British subject in 1910. Wellcome’s enterprises had been consolidated into the Wellcome Foundation, Ltd., in 1924 and, upon his death on July 25, 1936, this formed the foundation for the Wellcome Trust, which remains one of the world’s largest private biomedical charities.

Barnes, Frank L.

  • Person
  • 1872-1943

Frank Lister Barnes was born September 26, 1872 in Trinity, Texas, and died October 2, 1943, in Houston. Barnes graduated from Hill’s College in Waco and earned his MD from the College of Physicians and Surgeons in Baltimore, Maryland (this merged at some point with the University of Maryland School of Medicine) in 1896 and interned at Mercy Hospital. His middle name is sometimes reported to be “Lester”. He was a founding member of the Texas Surgical Society and American Board of Surgeons. He served in the Army, stationed at Galveston, during the Spanish-American War. Dr. Barnes built a hospital in Trinity in 1908 but moved to Houston in 1915. He is the father of Dr. Payton Barnes of Houston. Dr. Barnes is buried at Cedar Grove Cemetery in Trinity.
Note: Robert Howard Hill’s (1856-1919) Hill’s Business College operated in Waco from 1881 to about 1920. There is some information about it online (there were also multiple unrelated Hill’s Business Colleges operating in different states around the same time).

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