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Registro de autoridad

Daiger, Stephen P.

  • Persona

As background, I received my PhD from Stanford in 1975 in human genetics, started at UTHSC Houston in 1981, and have worked in human and medical genetics throughout my career. Most of my collection are items specific to our research (inherited eye diseases); though meaningful to me, they are not particularly “historic”. However, a.) I chaired the committee and did research to build the map of human chromosome 8 for the Human Genome Project and b.) I collaborated in establishing DNA forensics for the FBI and gave testimony to establish admissibility of FBI evidence.

Desmond, Murdina M., 1916-

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n94801680
  • Persona
  • 1916-2003

Dr. Desmond was born in the Hebrides Islands of Scotland in 1916. Her family immigrated to the United States when she was 7. She attended Smith College on scholarship, graduating in 1938, and obtained her M.D. in 1942 from Temple School of Medicine. Following her internship and six months of pediatric residency, Dr. Desmond joined the U.S. Naval Reserve as a physician and actively served through World War II, including time at Pearl Harbor.

Postwar, she completed her pediatric training and a fellowship in newborn research. In 1948, she moved to Houston, Texas to join the faculty of Baylor College of Medicine in the Pediatric Department which at that time consisted of four faculty members and two residents. In 1950, Baylor became affiliated with the former Jefferson Davis Hospital and a newborn service was established. Dr. Desmond became the first head of the newborn care section in the Pediatric Department.

In 1956, Dr. Desmond and two other physicians were alarmed at the death rate from staphylococcus infections at Jefferson Davis Hospital, the then city-county hospital. The doctors declared the nursery unsafe and closed it to any more admissions. Shortly thereafter, Dr. Desmond began the first neonatal intensive care unit in the nation at the hospital. Dr. Desmond also worked with infants born with drug addictions. She developed the transitional nursery in which at risk infants were under close observation for potential medical problems. Infants who were seriously ill were placed in a separate unit, which became the first newborn intensive care unit in the southwestern states of the United States. Until Jefferson Davis Hospital closed, Dr. Desmond served as director of nurseries and as pediatric coordinator of its Maternal and Infant Care project.

During the outbreak of rubella in 1963-64, Dr. Desmond worked with about 200 affected infants and children. She recognized that many at-risk infants, whom medical care was able to save, developed conditions that required comprehensive evaluation and long-term care. In 1973 she became the director of the Leopold Meyer Center for Developmental Pediatrics at Texas Children's hospital. During this period she was on the team which cared for David Vetter, the "Bubble Boy." The Desmond Neonatal Developmental Follow-up Clinic, named for Dr. Desmond, was established in 1994 to provide logitudinal follow-up and neurodevelopmental assessments for pre-term babies.

Dr. Desmond received the Apgar Award from the American Academy of Pediatrics; the Stanley Kalinski Award from the Texas Pediatric Society; and awards from Smith College and Temple University among others.

Dr. Desmond married James L. Desmond who she met while serving in the Naval Reserve. They were married after the war and then moved to Houston, Texas, where her husband had a dental practice until his death in 1972. She and her husband had two children. Dr. Desmond passed away in 2003.

Bruch, Hilde, 1904-1984

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n50055887
  • Persona
  • 1904-1984

Hilde Bruch was born in Dulken, Germany on March 11, 1904; her family was Jewish. An uncle encouraged her to study medicine and she graduated from Albert Ludwig University with a doctorate in 1929. She took academic and research positions with the University of Kiel and then the University of Leipzig, but left academia for private pediatric practice in 1932 because of rising anti-Semitism. She had already begun a career in pediatric physiology before she left Germany in 1933 after Hitler came into power. She then spent a year in England, where she worked at the East End Maternity Hospital, which served a Jewish community in an impoverished part of London. She moved to the United States in 1934 and worked at the Babies’ Hospital at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in New York City. She obtained her American medical license in 1935 and, in 1937, began research on childhood obesity, the beginning of her career studying eating disorders. She became an American citizen in 1940.
From 1941 to 1943 Bruch studied psychiatry at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore before returning to New York to open her own psychiatric practice and teach at Columbia University. She took a position in psychiatry at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston in 1964 and remained in Houston for the rest of her life. She died on December 15, 1984.

Starck, Patricia L.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/nr92024521
  • Persona

Dean Patricia L. Starck was born in Georgia. She earned a masters’ of nursing from Emory University and a doctorate of nursing in 1979 from the University of Alabama in Birmingham. She is also a graduate of the Institute of Educational Management at Harvard University and a licensed nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist in mental health and psychiatry. She served as dean of the UT Health Science Center from 1984 to 2014 and continues to serve the UTHSCH as Vice President of Interprofessional Education.

Memorial/Hermann Healthcare System

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n2006183770
  • Entidad colectiva
  • 1997-

Memorial Hermann Health System was formed in 1997 by a merger of Hermann Hospital and Memorial Health System. Both preceding institutions dated to the early 20th century, Hermann to 1925 and Memorial to 1907, and the merger created one of the biggest not-for-profit healthcare systems in the United States at the time. The System has branches all over the Houston area and its base location is one of two in the Texas Medical Center with a Level I trauma center.

University of Texas Speech and Hearing Institute

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n87117925
  • Entidad colectiva
  • 1951-1992

The University of Texas Speech and Hearing Institute was founded in 1951 as the Houston Speech and Hearing Clinic. It joined the UT system in 1971 and for a year was the Division of Communicative Disorders of the University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston. In October 1972 it was renamed the University of Texas Speech and Hearing Institute at Houston and became part of the UT Health Science Center at Houston. Struggling with reduced state funding, fewer resources for faculty and research, and diminished demand for educational programs, its services were taken over by the United Way of the Texas Gulf Coast and the Institute closed on October 31, 1992.

University of Texas Dental Branch at Houston

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n85224997
  • Entidad colectiva
  • 1905-

The Texas Dental College was established in Houston in 1905. It operated in the upstairs quarters on the north side of Franklin avenue between Main street and Fannin street. In 1925, the dental college built a modern teaching facility at Fannin street and Blodgett avenue. In 1929, the Texas Dental College was re-incorporated as a public trust under the direction of a board of trustees charged with the responsibility of providing quality training in the dental disciplines.

In 1932, Dr. Frederick C. Elliott from the University of Tennessee was brought on to serve as dean of the college. At this time in Houston the depression has cast an economic blight over the land. He was hoping for a freshman class of 30 to 40 but ended up with 11 students registered. Dr. Elliot became active in Chamber of Commerce committee work and, through service on the Educational Committee, pointed to the community’s needs for greatly expanded medical teaching and healing facilities. He developed a “total care” concept, calling for both public and private funds to provide facilities and services to meet the health and medical needs of all the citizens. Dr. Elliott quietly started discussions with Dr. Homer P. Rainey, the president of the University of Texas, and others in the University system, to lay the ground work for affiliation of the dental college with the university, with the dental college to remain in Houston as perhaps a unit in a medical teaching center which Dr. Elliott and Dr. E.W. Bertner sought for the community. On May 13, 1941, harry B. Jewett, chairman of the Chamber of commerce Educational Committee, on which Dr. Elliott then was serving, jumped the gun when he informed the Executive committee that the University of Texas would take over the dental college on September 1, 1941, and operate it as a unit of the University system. The official announcement did not come until August 29, 1942, contingent upon legislative approval and appropriation of state operating funds. The Legislature did approve, and on May 14, 1943, Governor Coke Stevenson signed the bill authorizing the affiliation.

The University took over the dental college as of September 1, 1943 leaving Dr. Elliott as the dean. Later, Dr. Elliott was named vice president of the University System. With the state cancer hospital already assured for Houston, and as further inducement for the University to take over the dental college, the Anderson trustees agreed to provide a site in the proposed medical center for the college and to donate $500,000 towards the cost of a building. In 1946 the Anderson trustees offered to provide an additional $1.5 million to the cancer hospital and the dental college. The two University institutions then approved for location in the medical center on a basis of $1 by the Foundation for each $2 provided by the State of Texas. The dental college trustees, all of whom had been active in seeking the affiliation were: Dr. Walter Henry Scherer, president; Dr. Joseph Phillip Arnold, vice president; Dr. Robert Henry Hooper, secretary; Dr. Paul Veal Ledbetter, Dr. Judson L. Taylor, and Dr. Elliot, ex officio secretary and dean of the college. Legislative approval of the affiliation of the dental college with the University, and appropriation of $109,000 for support of the college, remained to be accomplished in the regular session of the Texas Legislature, which convened early in 1943. Dr. Elliott met with the Chamber of Commerce Executive Committee on February 2,1943, to seek support in the legislature. Dr. Elliott reported to the committee on March 16, 1943, that the Senate and House committees had approved the legislation and complimented Representative Emmett Morse of Houston in handling the bill. A most important factor influencing favorable legislative action was the program embarked upon by the Texas Dental College to train dentist for the Army and Navy. Today the University Of Texas School Of Dentistry occupies handsome quarters in the Texas Medical Center, provided by funds from the State of Texas, the M.D. Anderson Foundation and the Houston Chamber of Commerce.

McLean Hospital

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n50064305
  • Entidad colectiva

Bloomingdale Hospital

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2015075345
  • Entidad colectiva

Haas, Felix L.

  • Persona
  • 1917-

Dr. Felix Levere Haas was born on October 26, 1917 in Alvin, Texas, the oldest son of three children. The Alvin native entered the University of Texas at Austin in 1939. His studies were interrupted with the onset of World War II. Haas en listed in the United States Army Air Corps. He received aviation training from January 5, 1942 - September 5, 1942. As a navigator he led numerous combat missions with the 13th Air Force over the South Pacific. He served until February 22, 1946 and was promoted to the rank of Captain.
In June of 1947, Haas received his Bachelor of Arts degree in Genetics and Bacteriology from U.T. He was awarded the Rosalie B. Hite Predoctoral Fellowship and continued to study for his Masters of Arts. Drs. Wilson S. Stone and Orville Wyss were pleased to have Haas as their research fellow. While experimenting he made an important discovery in the genetics of micro-organisms. He found that irradiation of the growth medium resulted in genetic mutations in bacteria when they were grown in it. In short, a biochemical basis must be present to produce mutations.
Felix Haas continued his research earning his M.A. in August of 1948. That same year he met Cathryn E. Swausch, Dr. Wyss' laboratory assistant. They worked closely together for the next two years and were married on January 21, 1950. By June, Dr. Haas received his doctorate in Biochemistry and Biology.
The Haas couple left the University of Texas at Austin for the California Institute of Technology, where Dr. Haas accepted a one year (1950-1951) postdoctoral fellowship in Genetics from the Eli Lilly Company. At the Institute he worked with Drs. George Beadle and Herschell Mitchell. The following year he was awarded a USPHS Postdoctoral Fellowship at the California Institute of Technology. With the outbreak of the Korean War Dr. Haas was recalled to active military duty. As a result he had to decline the fellowship.
Upon his return to Texas, Dr. Wilson Stone arranged for him an indefinite delay in the re-activation orders. He also made it possible for Dr. Haas to work as a research scientist for the Atomic Energy Commission. He conducted his research on the campus of the University of Texas at Austin and the Old Baker Estate in Houston (M.D. Anderson Hospital). Professor Stone and Dr. Haas worked closely until March of 1953.
The Bristol Laboratories Inc. of Syracuse, New York offered him the position of Senior Microbiologist. In his three years (1953-1956) with Bristol Laboratories he directed research on: improving by genetic mutations mold strains (Penicillium) used for the commercial production of penicillin; developing the Actinomycete strains which led to the production of tetracycline by fermentation (this production method and strain are currently responsible for the largest part of the world's supply of tetracycline). Dr. Haas also taught graduate students at the University of Syracuse. As an Associate Professor of Genetics he taught Genetics and Radiation Biology.
Dr. and Mrs. Haas and their three young sons left Syracuse, New York in May of 1956 and returned to Houston. The M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute appointed him head of the Department of Biology (1956-1975). His responsibilities included recruitment of faculty, formulating research and teaching policies, long-range planning and investigating funding sources.
From 1973 to 1975 Dr. Haas also served as Assistant to the Director of Research at M.D. Anderson Hospital.
Dr. Haas resigned as head of the Department of Biology in 1975 to assume the full duties of coordinating the research program of the hospital. He supervised and directed the Office of Research and served as advisor to the director and president on all matters concerning research at M.D. Anderson Hospital. In 1979 he accepted the position of staff assistant to the president.
On approval of the Board of Regents, the request for establishment of the UT GSBS was presented to the Texas Legislature, and was passed in Spring 1963. Governor John Connally signed the bill into law on June 10, 1963. By action of the Board of Regents the authorized school was established on September 28,1963.
Dr. Haas was a key figure in the founding of UT GSBS at Houston. He served as an important member of many special and standing GSBS Committees.
Between UT SCC, M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute and UT GSBS at Houston Dr. Haas was an active member of nearly twenty committees. They include: Education; Curriculum; Committee on Graduate Studies; Dean's Administrative Committee; Faculty Classification Committee. Virtually, every year since 1949, Dr. Haas has been a principal participant in national and international symposia and conferences. He has written forty three articles and nineteen abstracts. Dr. Haas lists memberships in the following professional and scientific societies: American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Society of Microbiology, Genetics Society of America, American Academy of Microbiology, American Institute of Biological Sciences, Radiation Research Society, American Association for Cancer Research, American Genetic Association. He has been honored by Phi Theta Kappa, Sigma Xi, listed in Who's Who in the South and Southwest and American Men of Science.
Dr. Felix L. Haas' leadership, knowledge and skill were essential to the success of established and new programs organized by UT SCC, M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute and UT GSBS at Houston. Dr. Haas retired in 1981 to enjoy his love of art, music, and spend time with his wife, Cathryn and their three sons, Michael, Stephen and Larry.

Cooper, Alan B.

  • Persona
  • 1928-2002

Alan Bruce Cooper was born in New York, New York on August 19, 1928. He earned a BS in 1949 and a Master’s in immunogenetics in 1951 from Wesleyan University, followed by an MD in 1955 from New York Medical School. After serving as chief of pathology at Harvard University, he joined the Air Force. After his discharge as a major, he taught at Baylor College of Medicine and New Orleans Psychoanalytic Institute in psychiatry and psychoanalysis. He was also in private practice in Houston between 1968 and 1985. In 1986, Dr. Cooper was appointed medical director of the University of Texas Adult Ambulatory Psychiatric Services and was later a professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. He died in Houston on December 29, 2002, of lung cancer.

Medical Arts Publishing Foundation

  • Entidad colectiva

Medical Arts Publishing Foundation was a brainchild of Dr. R. Lee Clark, president of M.D. Anderson Cancer Research Center (1946-1978). Through collaboration between Dr. Clark and Russell W. Cumley, the publishing company developed the Cancer Bulletin in 1948 as a fun, visual and entertaining medical journals to draw attention to the history of cancer research. Their initial vision was to create a “highly readable pictorial magazine for the general practitioner” that would increase early diagnosis of cancer. Other publications, Heart Bulletin in 1952 and Psychiatric Bulletin in 1951, followed that highlighted the history and studies in cardiology and psychiatry. Each publication had its own distinct style and motif. Joseph F. Schwarting was the Art Director and principle artist for all publications. The group of artists were based international and locally in Houston. Other artists include Eva Marie Schubart, Imelda Schubart, Peter Spier, Jo Spier, George Shackelford, Mary Shackelford, and Joseph Doeve. Medical Arts Publishing Foundation also published the regional journal, Medical Record and Annuals, with Joe Schwarting creating the cover art.

Vorobyov, Andrey

  • 1928-2020

Andrey I. Vorobyov (1928-2020), Academician of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences and the Russian Academy of Sciences, Doctor of Medical Sciences, Professor. He was Minister of Health in the government of Boris Yeltsin, 1991-1992.

Otto, Dorothy

  • Persona
  • d.2020

Dorothy Otto, EdD, MSN, RN, ANEF was an Associate Professor of Nursing Systems at the Cizik School of Nursing at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston.
When the University of Texas School of Nursing in Houston was created in 1972, she came on board as a founding faculty member. She also served as acting dean from 1975-1977. Continuing to teach until her retirement in 2015, Otto became a go-to source on the history of the School.
Otto was a world traveler and combined this interest with her professional life. For roughly a decade, she served as Academic Leader for Nursing International Journeys—trips that introduced colleagues to health care practices in places like Egypt, Russia, China, and elsewhere. She had a particular interest in Florence Nightingale and visited the Nightingale Museums in London and Istanbul.
Interested in the history of nursing, Otto amassed a collection of nursing-related stamps from the U.S. and other countries.
Otto parlayed her collections, travels, and long history at the University of Texas in Houston into lectures and presentations about the history of nursing, as well as its development in Houston and Texas.
Dr. Otto received her BSN from the University of Houston in 1954; her MSN from Texas Woman's University in 1971; and her EdD from the University of Houston in 1985. She started her nursing career in McAllen, Texas, before coming to Houston in 1972.
Dorothy Otto died January 4, 2020.

Source: https://www.uth.edu/news/story.htm?id=ca4f2d0e-ce7c-4bee-9130-6ed37226d990

Harris County Hospital District

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2008077807
  • Entidad colectiva
  • 1965-

The Harris County Hospital District was created by voter referendum in November 1965 and formalized with taxing authority in January 1966. Its creation followed the publication of Jan de Hartog’s The Hospital, an expose of the conditions at Jefferson Davis Charity Hospital (opened 1924). The District replaced a contentious city-county system in which both were responsible for support of the hospital. Quentin Mease was a founder and chairman of the District.
Lyndon B. Johnson General Hospital opened in 1989. In 1990, emergency facilities at Lyndon B. Johnson and Ben Taub (1963) Hospitals were expanded and Harris County residents began to be assigned to each by ZIP code to better manage caseloads. HCHD was renamed Harris Health System in 2012.

Broering, Naomi C.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n81092900
  • Persona
  • 1929-2023

Naomi Cordero Broering, MA, MLS, AHIP, FMLA was the executive director at the Texas Medical Center Library from 1996-1999. During that time she was also the director of the Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM) South Central Region. Broering had a long and illustrious career in librarianship spanning four decades. She retired as dean of libraries at Pacific College of Oriental Medicine (PCOM) in San Diego in 2018.

Born in New York City in 1929 to Puerto Rican parents. Broering began her career as an administrator in medical libraries as director at Biomedical Information Resources Center and medical center librarian, Georgetown University Medical Center, Dahlgren Memorial Library from 1975-1996. She had a vision for technology in libraries and how it could expand access to health informaiton to larger user bases.

As executive director of the TMC Library, Broering's goal was to "create a library of the future - a center of excellence to match the Texas Medical Center." (TMC News, Vol. 18, no. 23, December 14, 1996). Under her leadership, the library focused on increased online access to resources, telehealth care and telemedicine, and knowledge management programs. As part of the library's initiatives, an annual series of Computers in Health Care Conferences began with Tele-Health Care 1997. The conference highlighted "cutting edge tele-medicine and computer technology projects from leaders in the field . . . [discussing] the impact of telemedicine and adbanced technologies on the delivery of health care in the future." (HAM-TMC Library, Library Lines, Vol. 10, No. 6, July-August 1997)

Throughout her career, Broering received accolades and reached the highest levels of leadership: Medical Library Association (MLA) President 1996-1997, member MLA of the Board of Directors, Distinguished Member of the Academy of Health Information Professionals, a Fellow of MLA and the American College of Medical Informatics, editor of the Bulletin of the Medical Library Association (BMLA), and founding member of the Friends of the National Library of Medicine.

In 2015, Broering along with her husband, Lieutenant Commander Gregory Chauncey, established the MLA Naomi C. Broering Hispanic Heritage Grant (now Latinx Heritage Grant) that awards "annually to a person of Latinx ethnicity, or a person who has an interest in Latinx community information services." (MLA website, https://www.mlanet.org/)

Broering died January 11, 2023.

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