Showing 15 results

Authority record
Pediatrics

Taylor, H. Grant

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n2019073155
  • Person
  • 1903-1995

Harvey Grant Taylor was born in San Francisco, California, on July 22, 1903, to Stella May (Benson) and Benjamin Rush Taylor. When he was five, his family moved to the Canadian wilderness near Calgary. His formal schooling did not begin until the family returned to California when he was twelve. He earned a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from San Jose State College in 1928 and a Master of Arts in education from Stanford in 1929. While pursuing a doctorate in psychology at Stanford, he enrolled at Duke University School of Medicine, completed his studies in just over three years, and obtained his medical degree in 1939. He interned at Duke Hospital 1939-1940, was an assistant resident there 1940-1941, and served as a pediatric resident and assistant in research in pathology at Alfred I. DuPont Institute 1941-1942. He met married Martha Worth "Pat" Rogers in Atlanta, Georgia in 1942; they had two sons. Taylor served in the Army Medical Corps for which he received a Bronze Star and a battlefield promotion for his work under fire in Okinawa. After the war, Lt. Colonel Taylor returned to Duke as Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Assistant Professor of Bacteriology, and Assistant Dean of the School of Medicine 1946-1947, and Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Associate Professor and Associate Dean there 1947-1949. He returned to Japan between 1949 and 1951 as Deputy Medical Director for Research with the ABCC and as a consultant for the Armed Forces Epidemiological Board in Korea. He served as Director of the ABCC from 1952 to 1954.

Dr. Taylor’s forty-one-year association with MD Anderson Hospital in Houston, Texas, began in 1954. He became MDAH’s first chief of the Section of Pediatrics, and he organized and headed the UT Postgraduate School of Medicine in Houston, which became the UT Health Science Center’s Division of Continuing Education. He retired in 1975 but continued his affiliation with MDAH and the Division of Continuing Education. In 1977, he was named Emeritus Director of Continuing Education at the UT Health Science Center. In 1985, he was named Emeritus Professor of Pediatrics at MDAH where his program of care that addressed the social, emotional, and medical needs of pediatric cancer patients formed the foundation for MDAH’s current system of pediatric therapy that integrates medical care and normal childhood development. When he was 87 he implemented an aluminum recycling program at MDAH that continues to generate thousands of research dollars annually.

Dr. Taylor’s ABCC experiences convinced him that teamwork and collaboration were necessary to obtain maximum benefit from medical research and education. He acknowledged parents’ heroic magnanimity and contributions as research partners when they granted permission to use experimental drugs that they were aware could not improve the condition of their child., "but if you can learn something that might help somebody else, go ahead and do it." In the late 1950s, his belief in cooperative research led Dr. Taylor to organize the first collaborative research group in the southwestern region of the U. S., the Southwest Cancer Chemotherapy Study Group, known today as the Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG as of 2010).

Dr. Taylor authored scores of articles for medical journals, reports for the ABCC, chapters for medical texts, and editorials throughout his career. In 1990 he published Pioneers in Pediatric Oncology, a collection of autobiographies of thirty-nine of the major contributors to the remarkable progress in this discipline. In 1991 he published Remembrances & Reflections, an autobiography edited by N. Don Macon and John P. McGovern, M.D. He received recognition for his humanitarian achievements through the years. In 1969 he received a special award from the Leukemia Society, in 1973 a $1,000 award from the Center for Interaction, a private Houston foundation, and a certificate of appreciation from the Regional Medical Program of Texas and Texas Regional Medical Program, Inc. He was given honorary Emeritus membership on the Pediatric Executive Committee of the Southwest Oncology Group in 1974 and the American School Health Association Award in 1975. In June and August 1975 tributes were organized in his honor by the UT System and the Harris County Medical Society, respectively. The annual Grant Taylor Lectureship was established by the UT Health Science Center in 1981. Among other honors, he was also given Life Membership in the DeMolay Legion of Honor and, in 1986, the Sidney Kaliski Award from the Texas Pediatric Society, a chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics.Dr. Taylor died September 19, 1995. He has an entry in the Handbook of Texas Online.

Bruch, Hilde

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n50055887.html
  • Person
  • 1904-1984

Hilde Bruch was born in Dulken, Germany on March 11, 1904; her family was Jewish. An uncle encouraged her to study medicine and she graduated from Albert Ludwig University with a doctorate in 1929. She took academic and research positions with the University of Kiel and then the University of Leipzig, but left academia for private pediatric practice in 1932 because of rising anti-Semitism. She had already begun a career in pediatric physiology before she left Germany in 1933 after Hitler came into power. She then spent a year in England, where she worked at the East End Maternity Hospital, which served a Jewish community in an impoverished part of London. She moved to the United States in 1934 and worked at the Babies’ Hospital at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in New York City. She obtained her American medical license in 1935 and, in 1937, began research on childhood obesity, the beginning of her career studying eating disorders. She became an American citizen in 1940.
From 1941 to 1943 Bruch studied psychiatry at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore before returning to New York to open her own psychiatric practice and teach at Columbia University. She took a position in psychiatry at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston in 1964 and remained in Houston for the rest of her life. She died on December 15, 1984.

Merrill, Joseph

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n77015012
  • Person
  • 1923-

Joseph Melton Merrill was born December 8, 1923 in Andalusia, Alabama. He attended the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa for 15 months before qualifying for medical school. He enlisted in the infantry reserves in 1942 and because special consideration was given to medical students, was sent back to Tuscaloosa to start medical school in September 1944. He was in the Air Force in the early 1950s. As of February 2021, no obituary or other indication of his death have been found.

Texas Children's Hospital

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n79032728
  • Corporate body
  • 1954-

Texas Children’s Hospital admitted its first patient in February 1954 and is among the largest pediatric hospitals in the US. It is affiliated with Baylor College of Medicine and was a contributor to the establishment of the Texas Heart Institute. Over the decades, it has pioneered treatments such as in-home care for respiratory failure; separation of conjoined twins; treatment and management of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID); biosynthetic growth hormone treatment; laser therapy for seizure disorders, early diagnosis and treatment of cystic fibrosis, and pediatric HIV. It has branches all over the Houston metro area, in Austin and operates a pediatric HIV/AIDS clinic in Uganda.

Sutow, Wataru W.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n80139900
  • Person
  • 1912-1981

Watauru W. Sutow, MD, is known for his work in pediatric oncology and for his pediatric studies with the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission. Sutow was born August 31, 1912 and died December 20, 1981. Sutow was a pioneer in defining and establishing pediatric oncology as a specialty and chemotheraphy as a viable adjunct or alternative to radiotherapy and surgery for the treatment of cancer. During the late 1940s and early 1950s, Sutow directed a pediatric research team for the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission. He later joined the University of Texas' M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. As a collaborator with the Brookhaven National Labratory, he conducted extensive research on the effects of radiation fallout on Marshall islanders.

Wataru "Wat" Walter Sutow was born August 31, 1912 in Guadalupe, California in the United States of America to Yasaku and Yoshi Sutow. He father was born in Fukushima, Japan, in 1868 and came to the Unites States in 1905. His mother, also of Fukushima, Japan, was born there in 1878, and migrated to the U.S. in 1911.

Wataru Sutow married Mary H. Korenaga in Guadalupe, California, in early September 1937. Mary was born May 28 1914, in Montrose, California. He attended the Stanford University School of Medicine from 1939-1942. As a result of the U.S. government's policy during World War II calling for imprisonment and revocation of civil rights for people of Japanese descent, Sutow was unable to finish his medical studies for most of the war. His family was forcibly relocated to Salt Lake City. He finally was able to complete his medical degree in 1945 at the age of 33. He earned his MD from the University of Utah College of Medicine.

The Sutows had two daughters while they resided in Salt Lake City, Ollie Ellen on October 3, 1942, and Chiyono Jean on September 14, 1946. Sutow completed his internship at Salt Lake City General Hostpital 1945-1946 and residency in the Departmnet of Pediatrics at the University of Utah 1946-1947. He obtained his license to practice medicine from the State of Utah on July 1, 1946; the State of California on September 24, 1947; and from the State of Texas on December 3, 1945.

Following the decision to use atomic weapons against Japan at the end of World War II in August of 1945, the United States government decided to study the immediate and long-term effects of ionized radiation on humans. Sutow was invited to help organize the pediatric portion of the studies by the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The Sutows left Salt Lake City in 1947 and were in Japan by 1948. During Sutow's first stint with the ABCC, he served as civilian head of the Pediatric Department. On January 16, 1950 they had their third and last child, a son named Edmund Keith who was born at Osaka General Hospital.

In 1950, the Sutow family returned to the United States. Sutow became a fellow at Stanford University where he worked with Dr. John Anderson. As a result of the Korean War, which began in June 1950, Sutow began serving in the U.S. Army in 1951 with the rank of Captain in the U.S. Army Medical Corps. He received his officer training in San Antonio and was assigned to the Far East Command. In that position, he again worked with the ABCC in 1953-1954 as Director of Pediatric Research doing the same job he earlier had done as a civilan.

Sutow was drawn to the Texas Medical Center through his working relationship with Dr. H. Grant Taylor, a former director of the ABCC. Taylor was the Professor of Pediatrics and Chief of the Section of Pediatrics of the University of Texas (UT) M.D. Anderson Hospital (MDAH) in 1954. Taylor recruited Sutow who joined MDAH pediatrics in 1954. Sutow served as assistant and associate pediatrician and associate professor of pediatrics until 1969 when he became pediatrician and Professor of Pediatrics. He was acting head of the department of pediatrics at Baylor College of Medicine from 1954-1978. From 1957 on, his association as research collaborator with Brookhaven National Laboratory allowed him to continue and elaborate on his reseawrch on long-term radiation effects including his study of Japanese infants who had experienced in utero exposure to atomic bomb fallout. Aside from the study of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki popultations, he was also involved in the ongoing study of the effects of the exposure of Marshall Islanders to radiation fallout in 1954.

In March 1954, the United States conducted the Castle Bravo shot on the Bikini Atoll in the Marshall Islands. The Bravo shot was the first code name of the first test of a dry fuel hydrogenn bomb detonated in the atomosphere. Due to unexpected weather patterns, the fallout fell on residents of Rongelap and Utirik atolls in the Marshall Islands. Source: Castle Bravo (April 29, 2015); Wikipedia; retrieved April 30, 2015 from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castle_Bravo.

While at MDAH, Sutow organized inter-institutional groups, such as the Southwest Cancer Chemotheraphy Study Group for which he chaired the Pediatric Division 1957-1969. He chaired the Childhood Solid Tumor Committee from 1969-1976. He was a member of the Pediatric Executive Committee of hte Southwest Oncology Group from 1972-1979. He was a member of hte National Wilms' Tumor Study Committee from 1967 and a member of the Executive Committee, Section of Oncology and Hematology, American Academy of Pediatrics, 1975-1978.

When Sutow joined the MDAH Pediatric Section, it consisted of four beds. In Sutow's obituary, which ran in the December 22, 1981 edition of the Houston Post, Dr. Charles A. LeMaistre, president of the UT System Cancer Center, praised Sutow for innovations in treating cancer. "Popular opinion at that time (1954) was skeptical of hte value of drugs in treating cancer, but ... Sutow's regimens for treatment of osteosarcoma (bone cancer) produced some of the most dramatic results ever achieved in pediatric oncology." LeMaistre said. Dr. Jan van Eys stated in the May-June 1982 edition of "The Cancer Bulletin" that Sutow's legacy was that "pediatric oncology addresses the child with cancer, not the cancer in the child ... [Sutow's] ultimate aim was the cured childen, not the cure ... he gave them complete life, not permanent dependency."

In addition to his research and medical practice, Sutow served as an editor or sat on editorial boards for numerous cancer-related publications. He published more than 250 journal articles, contributed to cancer and pediatric textbooks, and published a cancer reference bibliography, a textbook and a book on malignant solid tumor of children.

He was member and a fellow of numerous medical organizations, including the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Association for Cancer Research, the American Medical Association and numerous other organizations.

In his personal life, he was an avid conchologist, which is the study of mollusc shells, and a devoted student of philately, which is the study of stamps and postal history.

Brewer, Earl J.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n81090481
  • Person
  • 1928-2015

Earl J. Brewer, MD was a pioneer of pediatric rheumatology locally, nationally, and internationally. He founded and was chair of the pediatric department of Kelsey Seybold Clinic for 22 years; founded and was chair of the Rheumatology Section and Division at Texas Children's Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine for 30 years; and was also a clinical professor at Baylor. Earl was a prolific writer, and authored many medical papers and several medical, nonfiction, and fiction books.

Born in Fort Worth, Texas, on July 3, 1928, Earl grew up in North Texas, graduating from Arlington Heights High School in 1945. He attended The University of Texas in Austin for a year and a half followed by a year and a half in the United States Regular Army. After his army service, he worked at night as a hospital laboratory technician in Fort Worth at All Saints Hospital while he attended Texas Christian University, graduating in 1950.

In 1954, Earl graduated from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, aided by scholarships from the Jesse H. and Mary Gibbs Jones scholarship. He received specialty training in pediatrics at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston and Harvard Medical School in Boston.

Earl's professional career spanned 32 years, beginning with a small-town medical practice in Wharton, Texas. As founder and chair of the pediatric department of the Kelsey-Seybold Clinic, he directed the development of that department from 1961 to 1983. In addition, he was a leader both nationally and internationally in clinical research and educational/service projects for such organizations as the National Institutes of Health, the Food and Drug Administration, and the Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Department of Health and Human Services. As a pioneer in pediatric rheumatology, he developed and directed as clinical professor, the Pediatric Rheumatology Center and Section at both the Pediatric Department of Baylor College of Medicine and the Texas Children's Hospital from 1958 to 1988.

Earl wrote what were definitive books on juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, which were translated into several languages. He was a leader involved with several important stepping stones necessary for the development of pediatric rheumatology, including the writing of the criteria used in the diagnosis of JRA, founding and chairing the Pediatric Rheumatology Collaborative Study Group, organizing and chairing the Rheumatology Section of the American Academy of Pediatrics, and helping to organize and chairing the pediatric component of the American College of Rheumatology. He also was responsible for the pediatric rheumatology portion of the NIH, USA-USSR scientific cooperation program.

He worked with the National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases from 1975 to 1992 as principal investigator for four studies by 20 centers in the USA and 5 centers in the USSR concerned with arthritis in children. As founder and chairman of the Pediatric Rheumatology Collaborative Study Group he directed over 15 multicenter studies of anti-arthritis medicines resulting in approval of several new drugs by the FDA. His last study was of methotrexate in children with JRA in both the USA and USSR funded principally by the FDA and the USSR and was published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Earl was a member of the Arthritis Advisory Committee of the Food and Drug Administration from 1976 to 1980.

In 1984, Earl and other individuals interested in forming a parent/child/health professional organization for the purpose of learning together pioneered the first American Juvenile Arthritis Organization meeting in Keystone, Colorado. The meeting is now the largest of the Arthritis Foundation meetings.

Earl worked hard to promote better coordination of care, services and case management for children with chronic illness or disabling conditions. From 1986 to 1990, he worked full time with the DHHS Maternal and Child Health Bureau and Dr. C. Everett Koop, the Surgeon General, to facilitate development of family-centered, community-based coordinated care for children with special needs. With others, he actively developed the Family-to-Family Network to provide support, information, and referral for families with special needs children.

He published 200 peer-reviewed papers, books, abstracts, chapters, monographs, and pamphlets including two medical movies. He received numerous awards, including the Surgeon General's Exemplary Service Award, presented to him on September 7, 1988 by Dr. C. Everett Koop. The Arthritis Foundation and the American Juvenile Arthritis Organization created an annual award in Earl's name that is given yearly to a health professional who has made an outstanding contribution to the care of children with arthritis. The American Academy of Pediatrics created the Earl Brewer Travel Award that is given to an outstanding Pediatric Rheumatology Fellow for a research project yearly at the section's annual meeting.

After retiring from the practice of medicine in 1990, Earl wrote fiction and nonfiction full time, including Parenting a Child with Arthritis (co-authored), The Arthritis Source Book, and a novel, Picking Up The Marbles. Earl was a member of a number of civic and social organizations, and particularly loved his long association with The Tuesday Morning Breakfast Club and the Forest Club and the many close friends he had in those places.

He died on March 19, 2015 in Houston, Texas at the age of 86

Published in Houston Chronicle on Mar. 22, 2015, http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/houstonchronicle/obituary.aspx?pid=174451931

Fernbach, Donald J.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n83157715
  • Person
  • 1925-2013

Donald Joseph Fernbach was born April 10, 1925 in Brooklyn, New York. He served in the European Theater and earned a Bronze Star during World War II. He earned his Bachelor’s from Tusculum College in Greeneville, Tennessee, in 1948 and his MD from George Washington University School of Medicine in 1952, and came to Houston to study pediatrics as one of Baylor College of Medicine’s first residents. He also completed a residency at Children’s Medical Center and Harvard University School of Medicine in Boston, followed by a fellowship in hematology and oncology. He returned to Houston in 1957 to join the faculty at Baylor and helped found the Research Hematology-Oncology Service (now the Children’s Cancer Center) at Texas Children’s Hospital in 1958.
Dr. Fernbach coauthored the first textbook on clinical pediatric oncology, led the effort to screen for sickle cell disease in newborns, and was the first to transplant bone marrow between identical twins to treat aplastic anemia. He was the director of the Blood Transfusion Services at Texas Children’s from 1957 to 1971. He was one of the founders of Houston’s Ronald McDonald House and led the movement to ban smoking in the Texas Medical Center.
Dr. Fernbach died September 22, 2013, in Houston and is buried at the Houston National Cemetery.

Shriner's Hospital for Crippled Children

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n86842836
  • Corporate body
  • 1920-2021

The Shriners Hospital for Children (Houston) is one of 22 hospitals in the non-profit Shriners network and is affiliated with the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, Baylor College of Medicine, the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, and Scott and White Hospital (based in Temple, Texas). The Houston branch had its origins in the Arabia Temple Crippled Children’s Clinic, which was located at Baptist Sanitarium between 1920 and 1932. The Clinic moved to Methodist Hospital in 1932, occupying its own “Blue Bird Cottage” from 1934 to 1949; the facility was named for its sponsors, Methodist’s Blue Bird Ladies Auxiliary. Between 1949 and 1952 it borrowed space in Hermann Hospital, before reopening in its own building in 1952. It was renamed Shriners Hospital for Crippled Children in 1966. The last building was completed in 1996. In January 2020, Shriners Houston announced that it would close in 2021 and consolidate with the Shriners burn hospital in Galveston.

Children's Nutrition Research Center

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n88669068
  • Corporate body
  • 1978-

The Children’s Nutrition Research Center was created in 1978 as a joint venture among Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children’s Hospital, and the USDA Agricultural Research Service. It is one of six USDA nutritional research centers. The CNRC’s areas of study are nutritional metabolism in mothers, infants, and children; childhood obesity prevention; pediatric clinical nutrition; molecular, cellular, and regulatory aspects of nutrition during development; and developmental determinants of obesity in infants and children.

Desmond, Murdina MacFarquhar

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n94801680
  • Person
  • 1916-2003

Dr. Desmond was born in the Hebrides Islands of Scotland in 1916. Her family immigrated to the United States when she was 7. She attended Smith College on scholarship, graduating in 1938, and obtained her M.D. in 1942 from Temple School of Medicine. Following her internship and six months of pediatric residency, Dr. Desmond joined the U.S. Naval Reserve as a physician and actively served through World War II, including time at Pearl Harbor.

Postwar, she completed her pediatric training and a fellowship in newborn research. In 1948, she moved to Houston, Texas to join the faculty of Baylor College of Medicine in the Pediatric Department which at that time consisted of four faculty members and two residents. In 1950, Baylor became affiliated with the former Jefferson Davis Hospital and a newborn service was established. Dr. Desmond became the first head of the newborn care section in the Pediatric Department.

In 1956, Dr. Desmond and two other physicians were alarmed at the death rate from staphylococcus infections at Jefferson Davis Hospital, the then city-county hospital. The doctors declared the nursery unsafe and closed it to any more admissions. Shortly thereafter, Dr. Desmond began the first neonatal intensive care unit in the nation at the hospital. Dr. Desmond also worked with infants born with drug addictions. She developed the transitional nursery in which at risk infants were under close observation for potential medical problems. Infants who were seriously ill were placed in a separate unit, which became the first newborn intensive care unit in the southwestern states of the United States. Until Jefferson Davis Hospital closed, Dr. Desmond served as director of nurseries and as pediatric coordinator of its Maternal and Infant Care project.

During the outbreak of rubella in 1963-64, Dr. Desmond worked with about 200 affected infants and children. She recognized that many at-risk infants, whom medical care was able to save, developed conditions that required comprehensive evaluation and long-term care. In 1973 she became the director of the Leopold Meyer Center for Developmental Pediatrics at Texas Children's hospital. During this period she was on the team which cared for David Vetter, the "Bubble Boy." The Desmond Neonatal Developmental Follow-up Clinic, named for Dr. Desmond, was established in 1994 to provide logitudinal follow-up and neurodevelopmental assessments for pre-term babies.

Dr. Desmond received the Apgar Award from the American Academy of Pediatrics; the Stanley Kalinski Award from the Texas Pediatric Society; and awards from Smith College and Temple University among others.

Dr. Desmond married James L. Desmond who she met while serving in the Naval Reserve. They were married after the war and then moved to Houston, Texas, where her husband had a dental practice until his death in 1969. She and her husband had two children. Dr. Desmond passed away in 2003.

Hild, Jack R.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no91023037
  • Person
  • 1904-1992

Jack Romulus Hild was born February 27, 1904 in Waco, Texas. He earned his Bachelor’s degree from the University of South California at Los Angeles, and his MD from Tulane University in New Orleans, in 1929, after which he served an internship in pediatrics in Cincinnati, Ohio. He and his wife Dorothy moved to Douglas, Arizona, in 1933 and stayed there until 1939, when he completed his residency. During World War II, Hild achieved the rank of major in the Army Air Force Medical Corps. Two of his three children were injured by polio in the late 1940s and Hild and Dr. O.A. Fly were co-directors of the mass polio vaccinations in Harris County in 1962. He died on August 24, 1992, and is buried at Glenwood Cemetery in Houston.

Bickel, Laura C.

  • Person
  • 1912-1977

Laural Carnell Bickel was born in Shamokin, Pennsylvania, on June 2, 1912. She was educated at University of Wisconsin Medical School, (now the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health) and moved to Houston in the early 1940s. She was a pediatrician and did considerable work in both rubella and in congenital diseases. Dr. Bickel died in Houston on December 15, 1977.

Blattner, Russell J.

  • Person
  • 1908-2002

Russell John Blattner was born July 3, 1908, in St. Louis, Missouri and attended Washington University there. He received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1929, and his Doctor of Medicine degree in 1933. He took his hospital training with an internship at Barnes Hospital in St. Louis, and his residency at St. Louis Children's Hospital, and then at Princess Elizabeth of York Hospital for Children in London, England. He returned to St. Louis and in 1937, began his teaching career as an Instructor in the Department of Pediatrics in the Washington University School of Medicine. In 1940 he was promoted to the rank of Assistant Professor in his department. Three years later, in 1945, he advanced to the rank of Associate Professor.

His career in Houston began in 1947 when he was given the position of Professor of Pediatrics and Chairman of the Department of Pediatrics at Baylor College of Medicine. He was actively involved with the creation of the Texas Children's Hospital, beginning in 1948 when with architects he toured hospitals in Canada, Mexico and the United States in search of ideas for the soon-to-be-built Houston institution. His efforts came to fruition in 1954, when the new pediatric hospital opened its doors. Dr. Blattner worked continually to insure the success and development of Texas Children's Hospital as a sub-specialty hospital care hospital for children and as a teaching and research institution, and to promote excellent pediatric care throughout the Texas Medical Center, as well as in Harris County by developing an affiliation between Baylor and the city and county health departments. He helped to establish the Blue Bird Clinic at The Methodist Hospital, and was instrumental in securing the initial funding for the South Western Poliomyelitis Center which would later become the Texas Institute for Rehabilitation and Research.

Dr. Blattner had a long and distinguished career for which he often received recognition from his colleagues within the medical profession. In 1956 the Washington University School of Medicine Alumni awarded him their Alumni Citation for Outstanding Achievements and Service He was also designated Distinguished Service Professor at Baylor in 1968. In 1971 he was given the newly established J.S. Abercrombie Chair in the department of Pediatrics at Baylor. He was honored again in 1972 and in 1974, when he received the Outstanding Faculty Award from the Baylor College of Medicine Alumni Association and the American Medical Association's Abraham Jacobi Award. He became Emeritus Chief of Pediatrics at Hermann Hospital. He retired in 1977, but continued his affiliation with the Texas Medical Center by acting as a consultant to hospital and college, and as Distinguished Service Professor of Pediatrics at Baylor. In his retirement years he has become affiliated with the Well Baby Clinics for the City of Houston Health Department, where he continues his care for the pediatric subject and his academic interests by training Baylor students assigned to the clinics.

Dr. Blattner served his profession not only as an administrator and teacher but as a research scientist as well. He made major contributions in the field of infectious disease, most notably in the study of encephalitis. He was, moreover, noted for his concern and compassion because he ''combined specialization with old-time empathy and concern with each patient (WATCH, Spring 1977). He died December 6, 2002, in Gaithersburg, Maryland.

Able, Luke William

  • Person
  • 1912-2006

Luke William Able was born August 2, 1912 in Port Arthur, Texas, and his family moved to Houston when he was six. He earned his Bachelor’s from the University of Texas in 1933 and his MD from UTMB in 1940. He enlisted in 1942 while he was an intern at Hermann Hospital. Able survived a kamikaze attack on the USS Aulick in Leyte Gulf in the Pacific Theater on November 19, 1944. He suffered a shattered leg and other injuries but directed the treatment of wounded until he passed out from his own injuries. He was awarded a Silver Star and a Purple Heart and spent two years in the hospital recovering.
After the war, he trained at Children’s Hospital in Boston. He was head of the surgery department of Texas Children’s Hospital from 1954 to 1987. In 1964, he participated in one of the early separations of conjoined twins in Texas.
Dr. Able retired in 1988 due to complications from his World War II wounds. He died March 16, 2006 in Franklin, North Carolina.

Women's Auxiliary to Texas Children's Hospital

  • Corporate body
  • 1954-

Known for their red vests, the Women’s Auxiliary to Texas Children’s Hospital (WATCH) is a volunteer service organization that provides supplemental services for patients, families, and staff of Texas Children’s Hospital in Houston, TX. The organization was established in 1954 when Texas Children’s Hospital opened in the Texas Medical Center. From the beginning, WATCH has provided such services as, manning information kiosks, managing the coffee shop and toy shop, escorting patients and families through the hospital, conducting tours of visitors, and acting as hosts at medical symposia. They also provided clerical work and translation services. The organization began with 300 volunteers in 1954, and it has grown to over a thousand, providing tens of thousands of volunteer hours each year to all Texas Children’s Hospital locations in the Houston area. The Auxiliary publishes a magazine entitled WATCH that showcases volunteers, service programs, developments in the hospital, and fundraising events.

WATCH also has provided significant fundraising for the hospital through the years. The organization is one of the top ten donors to the Texas Children’s Hospital. The annual Silver Tea is one of the many fundraising projects organized by WATCH. Other projects have included vending machines, Christmas cards, toy shop sales, and an annual bazaar.

Junior Auxiliary to Texas Children’s Hospital is a program that offers junior volunteers between the ages of 15-18 the opportunity to interact with patients or perform administrative duties. The Junior Auxiliary or Junior Council was established in the late-1960s.

Texas Children’s Hospital opened on February 2, 1954 within the Texas Medical Center in Houston, TX. It is the primary pediatric training site for Baylor College of Medicine, which has one of the largest pediatric residency program in the United States. Members of the Houston Pediatric Society were first to recognize the urgent need for a children’s hospital in the area and began a series of informal planning sessions in August 1947. As a result, the Texas Children’s Foundation was organized and chartered expressly to develop plans for the hospital and secure community support for the project. Members of the Junior League of Houston, who sponsored a prenatal and children’s health clinic in the city since 1927, have been instrumental in the history and development of the hospital from the beginning. After the 1993 expansion, Texas Children's Hospital became the largest pediatric medical facility in the country.

SOURCES:

“Women’s Auxiliary to Texas Children’s Hospital”, 20th Anniversary Texas Children’s Hospital, The Junior League of Houston and The Women’s Auxiliary to Texas Children’s Hospital commemorate the 20th Anniversary of Texas Children’s Hospital, 1974

“Foundation and History of Texas Children’s Hospital”, 20th Anniversary Texas Children’s Hospital, The Junior League of Houston and The Women’s Auxiliary to Texas Children’s Hospital commemorate the 20th Anniversary of Texas Children’s Hospital, 1974

“Six Decades of Making a Difference”, Aspire, Texas Children’s Hospital blog, 2016, http://aspire.texaschildrens.org/donor/2016/1469/ [accessed 2/13/2018]

Handbook of Texas Online, "Texas Children's Hospital," accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/sbt06.