Showing 10 results

Authority record
Medical education

University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n84075298
  • Corporate body
  • 1972-

The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston is a public health science educational institution. It was created in 1972 by the University of Texas and comprises the UTHealth School of Dentistry (1905), UTHealth School of Biomedical Informatics (1972), the UT MD Anderson Cancer Center UTHealth Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences (1963, renamed 2017), the John P. and Kathrine G. McGovern School of Medicine (1969, renamed 2015), UTHealth School of Public Health (1969), and the Jane and Robert Cizik School of Nursing (1972, renamed 2017). Its teaching hospitals include Children’s Memorial Hermann Hospital, Memorial Hermann-Texas Medical Center, and Harris Health Lyndon B. Johnson Hospital. It also encompasses a long list of smaller centers and institutions that perform work specialized to different illnesses, disciplines, and areas of interest.

University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n50080776
  • Corporate body
  • 1970-

in 1962 there was a request, led by TMC co-founder R. Lee Clark, MD, to establish a graduate school of biomedical sciences in Houston. The UT Graduate School of BIomedical Sciences was approved by Texas House Bill 500 on October 14, 1963, with approval for Master’s of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in “biology, including, but not restricted to, areas of emphasis in radiobiology, biomathematics, generics, cytology, fine structure-electron microscope-analysis, molecular biology, with biochemistry and biophysics, microbiology, and virology. Biochemistry including, but not restricted to, areas of emphasis in molecular biology and chemical physiology. Physics including, but not restricted to, areas of emphasis in biophysics, nuclear medicine, and isotope studies. . . . with the stipulation that all areas of emphasis to be added in the future shall come within the three categories listed above (I.e. biology, biochemistry, and physics) and that the areas of emphasis be restricted to biomedical sciences that are adapted to the research facilities of the M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute.”
The University of Texas Medical School was established in 1970, also under the administration of the University of Texas, and its basic science faculty were assimilated into the Graduate School, where before they had worked through MD Anderson Cancer Hospital or occasionally the Schools of Dentistry and Public Health. In 1972, all of these schools were collected into the UT Health Science Center. As of 2001, graduate degrees in biomedical science that would formerly have been awarded through the UT Health Science Center or UT MD Anderson Cancer Center would be awarded through the GSBS. The name was updated in 2017 to The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center UTHealth Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences to reflect the longstanding partnership between the two institutions.

University of Houston College of Pharmacy

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2020048313
  • Corporate body
  • 1947-

The University of Houston School of Pharmacy opened in 1947 in the science building of the University of Houston, with physician and pharmacist Allan Collette as acting dean. It became accredited by the American Council of Pharmaceutical Education in 1950. It moved to the Lamar Fleming Building in 1963 and then into a new building in the Texas Medical Center in 1981. Ph.D. programs in pharmacology and pharmaceutics were established in 1987. Between 1977 and ???? the School worked with Baylor College of Medicine and UT Medical School to operate the Houston Pharmacological Center to provide drug information to medical professionals.

Texas Woman's University

  • https://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n79150431.html
  • Corporate body
  • 1901-

Texas Woman's University was founded in 1901 in Denton, Texas, as the Texas Industrial Institute and College for the Education of White Girls of the State of Texas in the Arts and Sciences; the current name dates to 1957. It began the first nationally accredited nursing program, affiliated with Dallas' Parkland Hospital, in Texas in 1950 and began awarding doctorates in 1953. It became integrated in 1961 and coeducational in 1994. The health science and nursing programs have additional campuses in Dallas and Houston.

Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2006019371
  • Corporate body

The Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education (SACME) was established April 2, 1976 as the Society of Medical College Directors of Continuing Medical Education (SMCDCME). On July 20, 1998, SMCDCME was re-named to its current title. Note: This Chronology was taken from the SACME website, History page www.sacme.org.

1976 Society established on April 2.

1981 First issue of Mobius published (Lucy Ann Geiselman, editor); Research Committee formed (Harold Paul, chair).

1984 Support of the Research and Development Resource Base in CME (Continuing Medical Education) by the Society (Dave Davis); RICME (Research in Continuing Medical Education) I (David Gullion, Lucy Ann Geiselman, chairs); Training of Society interviewers for "the change study."

1985 Change study interviews total 200.

1986-1988 Search for Society logo.

1986 RICME II (Dave Davis, chair).

1987 First issue of INTERCOM published in January (Harold Paul, Dene Murray, editors); Joint plenary session CME/SMCDCME; highlights of the change study.

1988 RICME III (John Parboosingh, Jocelyn Lockyer, chairs); First Congress on CME (Phil R. Manning, Chair); First honorary member of the Society (Cyril Houle); Title change from Mobius to JCEHP (The Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions) with v. 8 (1); Development of first membership brochure (Harold Paul, Dene Murray and others).

1989 Change study published (Robert Fox, Paul Mazmanian, R.Wayne Putnam, editors); Changing and Learning in the Lives of Physicians; Strategic plan for the Society (George Smith); Membership in the Council of Academic Societies (James Leist, Dale Dauphinee).

1990 First meeting of the "Armadillo Society" (past presidents); RICME IV (Nancy Bennett, chair).

1991 Tri-Group leadership formalized by Alliance for Continuing Medical Education (ACME), Association for Hospital Medical Education (AHME) and SMCDCME; Foundation for research established (James Leist); First Distinguished Service Award (Malcolm Watts).

1992 JCEHP reorganized (James Leist); Third Congress on CME (George Smith, chair); SMCDCME incorporated (George Smith and Robert Kristofco); New JCEHP editor appointed (William Felch); Society home established at AAMC (Brownell Anderson); Position paper presented: The Role of Continuing Medical Education in Academic Health Centers (William Easterling).

1993 Distinguished Service Award (Phil Manning); Research Award (Dave Davis); CME Glossary (Joe D'Angelo); Society listserv established (Robert Bollinger); First Society brochure competition (Susan Duncan); New member orientation established at Spring Meeting (Deborah Holmes).

1994 Distinguished Service Award (Julian S. Reinschmidt); Research Award (Robert Fox); Research Endowment Council established (Brian O'Toole); Task force white paper, The connection between continuing medical education and health care reform (George Smith, Gloria Allington).

1995 Request from AAMC for statement on CME; Reorganization of AAMC's Group on Educational Affairs (GEA), continuing education one of four sections; Pew-Glaxo Working Group on the Future of Academic CME Research Award established (Jocelyn Lockyer, recipient); Distinguished Service Award (Martin Shickman); Report of Society working group on Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) essentials and standards, Future directions for medical college continuing medical education (Arnie Bigbee, chair); Request from ACCME for SACME accreditation surveyors.

1996 Four Society task forces and focus groups address the task force report; Society invited to participate in restructuring of the ACCME.

1997 SMCDCME listserv established by Bob Bollinger.

1998 July 20, SMCDCME re-named the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education (SACME).

1999 SACME Web site created by Bob Bollinger.

Smythe, Cheves M.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n89664729
  • Person
  • 1924-2020

Cheves McCord Smythe was born in Charleston, South Carolina in 1924. He was born into a well-established South Carolina family. Smythe received his undergraduate degree from Yale College in 1943, and his medical degree in 1947 from Harvard Medical School. He completed his internship and residency at the Boston City Hospital. Next, he served as a Research Fellow at the Presbyterian Hospital in New York. Following this, he returned to the Boston City Hospital as a Chief Resident. From 1942-1966, Smythe served in the U.S. Naval Reserve. He was a part of the Medical Corps and became a Lieutenant Commander. He retired from the Naval Reserve in 1966. Beginning in 1955, Smythe started as an Instructor in Medicine at the Medical College of South Carolina. He eventually becoming an Assistant Professor of Medicine and finally Dean. He remained as Dean from 1963 until his departure in 1966. The following four years he served as Assistant Director and Director of the Department of Academic Affairs at the Association of American Medical Colleges. The bulk of his career was spent at The University of Texas Medical School at Houston, where he became the first dean of the school in 1970. He would remain as dean until 1975. Smythe continued his profession at the university until 1995, serving as Professor, Adjunct Professor, and Dean Pro Tem. Smythe continued his career abroad when he became the Dean at the Aga Khan University in Karachi, Pakistan. He served in this role from 1982 to 1985. His involvement with the school continued, and he returned as Professor and Chairman of the Department of Medicine from 1990 to 1991. Smythe had many hospital appointments including the Hermann Hospital, Memorial Southwest Hospital, and the LBJ Hospital. He was also a member of many medical organizations and received many honors and awards. In addition, he was the author of numerous publications. For a complete list of accomplishments please visit Smythe’s vitae and bibliography.

Dr. Smythe died May 11, 2020, in Charleston, South Carolina.

Houston Academy of Medicine

  • Corporate body
  • 1915-

The Houston Academy of Medicine was created in 1915 by the Harris County Medical Society to facilitate physicians’ access to up-to-date medical and scientific information.

Fred, Herbert L.

  • https://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n88090673.html
  • Person
  • 1929-2018

Herbert Leonard Fred, MD was born June 11, 1929 in Waco, Texas. He was known for his contribution to medical education. He was an award-winning clinician, diagnostician, and professor of internal medicine. Dr. Fred, an emeritus American Osler Society member, centered his medical practice on the patient, championing the use of the mind and five senses to develop medical diagnoses.

In Waco, the Fred family was known for community service, keen athletic team support, and their jewelry store, L. Fred and Son. His father, Isadore (Isie) Fred (1897-1969) received a posthumous City of Waco Commemoration for contributions to the community. Famous for his zest for life and his warm heart, Isie was a friend of many community and national leaders in athletics and film. Dr. Fred’s mother was Helen Louise Marks (1905-1985). He had one sister, Shirley Fred Strauss (1932-2014). Dr. Fred’s paternal grandparents were Louis Fred (died 1940), a Prussian immigrant who became a naturalized citizen of the United States in 1908, and Pauline (Peshi) Fred (1866-1950). Dr. Fred’s maternal grandparents were Samuel Marks (1866-1932) and Fannie Marks (1869-1956). Dr. Fred married Lucille (Lucy) Therese Maule (born 1928) in 1954. They had three children: Stuart Fred (born 1955) and twins Nancy Lynn Fred Sadick and Michael Fred (born 1957). Dr. Fred and Lucy divorced in 1976. Dr. Fred married Judith Ann Edgar Biddington in 1978. She had four children from her first marriage: Lisa Collette Biddington (born 1961), Floyd Wesley Biddington (born 1965), Gregory Leonard Biddington (born 1969), and Stefani Biddington, (birth date unknown).

Dr. Fred spent his boyhood in Waco, Texas, graduating from Waco High School in 1946. He attended then Rice Institute (today Rice University) in Houston, TX, graduating in 1950. He attended medical school at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland from 1950 to 1954. He completed his medical training as an internist with a two year internship and residency at The University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah in 1957. Dr. Fred served as a Captain in the United States Air Force Medical Corps from 1957-1959, acting as Chief of Medicine at the Amarillo Air Force Base Hospital in Amarillo, Texas. He then returned to Salt Lake City first as Chief Resident, Department of Internal Medicine, at the Salt Lake City General Hospital and then as an Instructor in Medicine at the University of Utah College of Medicine from 1959 to 1961. In 1962, Dr. Fred and his young family moved to Houston, Texas where Dr. Fred accepted an appointment as Instructor in Medicine at Baylor University College of Medicine.

Dr. Fred worked at institutions in Houston, Texas for the remainder of his career. After holding a number of academic positions at Baylor from 1962 to 1969, Dr. Fred left Baylor to accept a position as Director of Medical Education at St. Joseph Hospital in 1969 where he continued until 1988. In addition, he accepted positions as Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine at the University Of Texas Graduate School Of Biomedical Sciences in 1968 and as Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, at The University of Texas Health Science Center in 1971, retaining both appointments today. From 1979 to 2002, Dr. Fred served as Adjunct Professor, Human Performance and Health Sciences, at his alma mater, Rice University. From 1988 to 1993, Dr. Fred held a position as the Educational Coordinator at the HCA Center for Health Excellence. Beginning in 1982, Dr. Fred served as a medical expert witness in a number of medical malpractice trials. Records pertaining to these trials from 1988 to 2011 are located in the Legal Series. These folders are restricted due to the use of patient names until 2050. Dr. Fred is a member of thirteen medical societies including the American Medical Joggers Association, American College of Physicians, American College of Chest Physicians, American College of Sports Medicine, American Medical Writers Association, and American Osler Society.

Dr. Fred received numerous awards for teaching excellence from students and peers. Highlights include: Outstanding Full-Time Clinical Faculty Member at Baylor University College of Medicine in 1964 and 1967; a citation from President Ronald Reagan in October 4, 1988 for 27 years as a medical educator; The Benjy F. Brooks, M.D. Outstanding Clinical Faculty Award from the Alumni Association of the University of Texas Medical School in Houston in 1999; honoree of The Herb Fred Medical Society, Inc., a corporation established in 2002 by former students; The American College of Physicians – American Society of Internal Medicine Distinguished Teacher Award along with election to Mastership in The American College of Physicians in 2004; the TIAA-CREF Distinguished Medical Educator Award in 2005; and The American College of Physicians Laureate Award in 2012.

Dr. Fred’s running and medical practices intersected. Some of his scholarly articles include clinical descriptions of long distance running effects on the human body and promote running as preventive medicine. He often combined participation in running events with visiting professorships and Grand Rounds at other medical institutions. Dr. Fred began his competitive running career by running marathons but later switched to ultra-marathons, 100 mile races lasting 24-26 hours. Dr. Fred holds 3 National Age Records. By 2011, Dr. Fred had run a total of 244,950 miles.

Dr. Fred’s writing career arose from his medical practice and running competition. A tenacious advocate of clarity and precision in medical discourse both in his teaching and as an author, Dr. Fred determined to improve the accuracy of medical communication, written and spoken. Dr. Fred wrote over 450 scholarly medical articles. He served as editor-in-chief of the Houston Medical Journal from 1984 to 1988 and Houston Medicine from 1988 to1993. Other editorial responsibilities included positions with Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise from 1979 to 1986, Annals of Sports Medicine from 1982 to 1985, Circulation from 1995 to 2004, Resident and Staff Physician from 2003 to 2008, and Texas Heart Institute Journal from 2011to the present. Dr. Fred served as a peer reviewer for Southern Medical Journal, Chest, Journal of the American Medical Association, and Circulation. He was a correspondent for Ultrarunning magazine from 1981 to 1986. Dr. Fred authored several books in his career, including "Elephant Medicine and More", "Say Aah, Medical Writing: A Practical Guide", "Looking Back (and Forth): Reflections Of An Old-Fashioned Doctor", "Images of Memorable Cases: 50 Years At The Bedside", and "The Best of Herb Fred, MD".

Dr. Fred served on the Board of Trustees for the Houston Congregation for Reform Judaism from 1995 to 2004, acting as President of the Board from 1996 to 1998. Additionally, he joined the Board of Directors for the Friends of the Texas Medical Center Library in 2007, acting as Secretary from January 2011 to the present.

Dr. Fred continued to practice medicine and ran 11 miles a day on his treadmill until 2016. He retired in 2016. Dr. Fred died on December 30, 2018 and is buried in Agudath Jacob Cemetery in Waco.