Reel #3. Side #2. Recording of a meeting

Identity elements

Reference code

AVA-IC002-004B

Level of description

Item

Title

Reel #3. Side #2. Recording of a meeting

Date(s)

  • 1968/10/28 (Creation)

Extent

one 5" reel-to-reel audiotape (31:31)

Name of creator

(1946-)

Administrative history

The Texas Medical Center is a comprehensive medical community located south of downtown Houston. It comprises 54 institutions, including four medical and seven nursing schools, 21 hospitals, three level-I trauma centers [8], eight specialty institutions, and academic and research institutions for many other health-related disciplines[9]. The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center is among the top-ranked cancer hospitals in the country[10]. As of 2017, it is one of the largest medical centers in the world[7].

The Texas Medical Center was proposed by Horace Wilkins, Col. William Bates, and John H. Freeman, the trustees of the M.D. Anderson Foundation. Established by cotton magnate Monroe Dunaway Anderson in 1936[1], the Foundation supported a variety of small causes until Anderson’s death in 1939, at which point the trustees, with the encouragement of Ernst Bertner, M.D., and Frederick Elliott, D.D.S., decided the funds should be used to build a medical center on par with Johns Hopkins and the Mayo Clinic[2]. When, in 1941, the state legislature approved an act to create a cancer hospital[3], the Anderson Foundation trustees secured Houston as the location for the M.D. Anderson Cancer Hospital, which would become first component of the medical center. The Texas Medical Center would be located on a site adjacent to Hermann Hospital, which had opened south of downtown in 1925.

The Texas Medical Center was officially incorporated in 1946 and Bertner was appointed president, replaced at the Cancer Hospital by R. Lee Clark, M.D. The Cancer Hospital was quickly joined by the Dental College, by then affiliated with the University of Texas[16], and Baylor University College of Medicine, which moved from Waco. The Anderson Foundation made grants to Methodist Hospital, Shriners Hospital for Crippled Children, St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital, Texas Children’s Hospital, a new building for Hermann Hospital, and for a library[15].

The Texas Medical Center grew quickly and has provided a home for innovators such as heart surgeons Michael DeBakey and Denton Cooley; William Spencer and his work on rehabilitation of paralysis patients; trauma surgeon and medevac pioneer James “Red” Duke; and Nobel Prize-winning pharmacology researcher Ferid Murad[17].

SOURCES:

[1-5] TMC History 1971
[6] Handbook of Texas Online, Ernst W. Bertner.
[7] Facts and Figures, About Houston, City of Houston, 2017 July 24, www.houstontx.gov/abouthouston/houstonfacts.html
[8] Texas Trauma Facilities, Texas Health and Human Services, Texas Department of Health and Human Services, 2017 July 24, https://www.dshs.texas.gov/emstraumasystems/etrahosp.shtm.
[9] “Texas Medical Center: Houston is where the world comes for treatment”, About Houston, Greater Houston Convention & Visitors Bureau, 2017 July 24, https://www.visithoustontexas.com/about-houston/texas-medical-center/
[10] Institutional profile, Facts and History, 2017 July 24, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, https://www.mdanderson.org/about-md-anderson/facts-history/institutional-profile.html.
[12] Handbook of Texas Online
[13] New York Times, 1994 May 05, online.
[11] Mary Schiflett obituary, Houston Chronicle online, January 19, 2007.
[14] Bryant Boutwell, Ph.D, Bout Time blog, 2014 January 31
[15] TMC History 1971, p178
[16] Handbook of Texas Online, University of Texas Dental Branch
[17] TMC News, 2014 August 19

Content and structure elements

Scope and content

This sound recording comes from Side 2 of a 5" Audio Reel-to-Reel labeled "Reel #3." It is dated 10/28/68 and appears to be a continuation of the same meeting taking place at the end of Side 1 of the Audio Reel-to-Reel. It records the meeting of an unidentified organization. The agenda items focus on the approval and administration of medical programs with a focus on the Houston area. The recordings feature the introduction of proposals/items, debate, amendments, and voting.

The recording opens with a vote of disapproval, followed by a movement to re-open and motion to defer. There is a motion for reconsideration of Proposal 6. Following a discussion of the program and funds, the motion is withdrawn.

(8:02) Items 7, 8, and 9. "Projects relating to recruitment, education, improved training for allied health personnel.” It is recommended that it be referred back to the coordinator of Regional Medical Programs and that he form a special committee or task force to develop a proposal. An Amendment is proposed to consider Item 9 relating to junior colleges separately. Other programs up for discussion and vote are an educational media instructional program and a program for medical service assistants, clinical research, and administration. There is discussion of whether these proposals should be considered separately. There is a vote on an amendment to consider 9 separately. There is consideration of the role of junior colleges in paramedical training. There is a vote with 19 in favor to send Items 7 and 8 to committee.

(20:10) Item 9 “Recruitment of allied healthcare workers.” There is a movement for approval followed by discussion. A speaker notes that it would augment and amplify an existing project and establish an advisory committee. One speaker addresses Dr. Eastwood (possibly Dr. Richard T. Eastwood, President of the TMC). It is noted that one aspect of the proposal was intended to bring together elements related to junior colleges, but more important was total recruitment of allied healthcare workers. There is a vote with 19 in favor.

(27.42) Proposal 10 “Extending primary care nursing training based in Riverside and St. Joseph's.” The Steering committee had recommended deferring action on this proposal and appointing a subcommittee, after which there was a recommendation for approval. There is a motion to approve Item 10. A speaker alludes to a program already ongoing, but the recording ends abruptly.

System of arrangement

Conditions of access and use elements

Conditions governing access

Digital copy made available by the Texas Medical Center Library

Physical access

Technical access

Sound

Conditions governing reproduction

Creative Commons License 4.0, Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs. Images are to be used for educational purposes only, and are not to be reproduced without permission from The TMC Library, McGovern Historical Center, 1133 John Freeman Blvd, Houston, TX, 77030, mcgovern@library.tmc.edu, 713-799-7899

Languages of the material

  • English

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  • Processing information: Digitization supported by South Central Academic Medical Libraries Consortium (SCAMeL) Speedy Startup funds, 2022.

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