Endocrinology

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Endocrinology

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Endocrinology

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Endocrinology

5 典拠レコード results for Endocrinology

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Steinberger, Emil

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n79113192
  • 個人
  • 1928-2008

Dr. Steinberger was born December 20, 1928 in Berlin, Germany, and grew up in Poland. Both of his parents were dentists. His family fled to the Soviet Union in 1939, spent two years in the Gulag Nuziyary, and then settled in Kazakhstan. They returned to Poland after the war but then resettled in American-occupied Germany, at Kassel. Steinberg began medical school in Frankfurt but emigrated to New York in 1947. The rest of the family followed a year later.
Steinberg married Anna (surname?), whom he had met in Kazakhstan, and they ended up in Iowa City, where Steinberg earned his MD from the University of Iowa in 1955. He volunteered for the US Navy for two years and then returned to academics. He was chair of the Department of Endocrinology and Human Reproduction and Albert Einstein Medical Center in Philadelphia from 1961 to 1971. In 1971, he moved to Houston to join the new UT Medical School as head of the Department of Reproductive Medicine. He left UT in 1984 to establish the Texas Institute for Reproductive Medicine and Endocrinology (note, as of 2020 this seems not to be in independent operation any more). He retired in 2001.
Dr. Steinberger died in his sleep of lung cancer on October 12, 2008, in Houston. He is buried at Emanu El Memorial Park in Houston.

Kelsey, Mavis P.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n80061247
  • 個人
  • 1912-2013

Dr. Mavis Parrott Kelsey, founder and senior partner of the Kelsey-Seybold Clinic, P.A., was born in Deport, Texas on October 7, 1912. In 1932 he received his Bachelor of Science degree from Texas A&M College. Inspired by his grandfather, country doctor Dr. Joseph Benson Kelsey, he attended the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, earning his MD in 1936. Dr. Kelsey served a rotating internship at New York City's Bellevue Hospital before returning to UTMB for a year as an Instructor in Pathology. From 1938 to 1939 he served on the Junior staff of Scott and White Clinic in Temple, Texas. On September 17, 1939, Dr. Mavis P. Kelsey married Mary Randolph Wilson. In that same year he accepted a three-year fellowship in internal medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, where he befriended Dr. William Dempesey Seybold, whom he had first met at UTMB. Dr. Kelsey's stint at the Mayo Clinic was interrupted by his service in the U.S. Army Air Force, Medical Corps from 1941-1945. His assignments a included Certified Flight Surgeon's rating; Surgeon of the 11th Fighter Command in Alaska, 1942-1943; Editor-in-Chief of the Air Surgeon's Bulletin. Dr. Kelsey attained the rank of Lieutenant Colonel and was awarded the Legion of Merit in 1945. For awhile during the war, the Kelseys were stationed in Dayton, Ohio, where Dr. Kelsey worked at the Aero Medical Research Laboratory, Wright Field Air Force Base.

After the War, Dr. Kelsey completed his training at the Mayo Clinic receiving a Masters of Science in Internal Medicine from the University of Minnesota, Mayo Foundation, in 1947. He was appointed to the Mayo Clinic staff as an Instructor in Medicine. After some deliberation, the Kelseys returned to Houston on January 15, 1949. Dr. Kelsey leased office space in the new Hermann Professional building with the intent to practice internal medicine with an emphasis on endocrinology. Unfortunately, construction was running behind and the office was not ready, so Dr. E.W. Bertner and Dr. George Waldron each offered free office space. Dr. Kelsey divided his time between the two offices until May. In 1950 Dr. Kelsey encouraged Drs. Leary and Seybold to reconsider the prospect of establishing a clinic in Houston, and idea they had discussed while working together at the Mayo Clinic, Leary in chest diseases and Seybold in surgery. Seybold moved to Houston in October of 1950 and Leary in January of 1951 and the three physicians founded the Kelsey-Leary-Seybold Clinic. The Clinic first resided on the fourteenth and eighth floors of the Hermann Professional Building.

In addition to his clinic practice, Dr. Kelsey held many teaching and administrative posts. Among them were: Instructor of Medicine, Mayo Foundation in the University of Minnesota; Acting Dean, the University of Texas Postgraduate School of Medicine; Clinical Professor of Medicine, University of Texas School of Biomedical Sciences; Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine. Dr. Kelsey also served on the staff of St. Luke's Hospital (Consulting Staff and Vice Chief of Staff), Methodist Hospital and M.D. Anderson Hospital for Cancer Research. Dr. Kelsey also acted as Medical Advisor for many corporations including the Pennzoil Corporation, Roy M. Huffington, Inc. and United Energy Resources. Over the years Dr. Kelsey has been an active member in many professional associations and organizations. They include: Alpha Omega Alpha, Alpha Kappa Kappa, Sigma Xi, he was elected to the Philosophical Society of Texas, Fellowship in the American College of Physicians, Aerospace Medical Association, American Thyroid Association, Harris County Medical Association, Texas Medical Association, The Endocrine Society, American Medical Association, Mayo Alumni Association, American and Texas Diabetes & Endocrine Association, American Cancer Society (Board of Directors, Harris County Unit), Yearbook of Cancer (Editorial Consultant), Kelsey-Seybold Foundation member of the Board of Trustees and Grants Committee, Member of the President's Council for Texas A&M Medical College and the Sterling C. Evans Library, First City National BankMedical Center (Board of Directors), Development Board of University of Texas Medical School-Galveston. Dr. Kelsey's participation in civic and social organizations reflect his interest in the fine arts, history and genealogy and nature. He has devoted time and resources to the Houston Country Club, A&M Association of Former Students, Friends of the A&M University Library, University of Texas Health Science Center-Presidents Club, Allegro, UT Alumni Association, Texas Nurseryman's Association, Texas Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, ASIA Society, Friends of Bayou Bend, American Book Collector's Society, Beaumont Art Museum, Harris County Heritage Society, Southwestern Cattleman's Association, and the Houston Committee on Foreign Relations, a charter member of the American Historical Print Society. Dr. Kelsey is a Distinguished Alumnus of Texas A & M and an Ashbel Smith Distinguished Alumnus of the U.T. Medical School in Galveston.

Dr. Kelsey and his wife, Mary had a great love for American art and Americana. They donated their collections to several museums and university libraries. The Mavis and Mary Kelsey Collection of Winslow Homer Prints is housed in the Museum of Fine Arts Houston. Dr. Kelsey wrote the catalog for this Collection, named "Wilson Homer Graphics", which is an authoritative reference work used by Homer scholars nationwide. The United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland received their collection of Naval Prints. The Kelsey Collection of Thomas Nast Illustrations was donated to Pepperdine University. The University of Houston was given a collection of wood engravings on Social Life and War. The Kelseys’ collection of the letters of John Quincy Adams was given to Bryan Mawr College. Dr. and Mrs. Kelsey gave to the Sterling C.-Evans Library of Texas A&M University their Collection of Americana. Several thousand books, art works and prints make up this outstanding collection. He and his wife traveled extensively and studied their respective family histories. They wrote six books of genealogy.

Dr. Kelsey was an active farmer and rancher for many years and participated in a number of other business activities including oil exploration and apartment building. After his retirement he Mary devoted their time in writing genealogy; cataloging and writing about their extensive collection of historical and art prints, painting and rare books, investing and philanthropy. In 1985, Dr. Kelsey retired from the Kelsey-Seybold Clinic after thirty-seven years. He died November 12, 2103.

Knobil, Ernst

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n85312918
  • 個人
  • 1926-2000

Dr. Knobil was a leader and pioneer in many areas of endocrinology, including growth and reproduction. Kr. Knobil's classic contributions include the species-specific effects of Growth Hormone (GH), a model for positive and negative estrogen feedback control of the menstrual cycle, and elucidation of the hypothalamic Gonadotrpin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) pulse generator. His discovery that pulsatile GnRH stimulates Luteinizing Hormone (LH) secretion, altered the field of reproductive endocrinology. This observation also unmasked a pivotal role for pulsatile secretion as a mechanism of hormonal control. Dr. Knobil died April 13, 2000.

The son of an Austrian parents, Dr. Knobil was born in Berlin, Germany on September 20, 1926. The Knobil family moved to Paris in the early 1930's. When the Germans invaded Paris in 1940, the family emigrated to New York City where he attended high school.

At the age of 15, he entered the New York State College of Agriculture at Cornell in 1942. He chose Animal Science as his major due to interests developed from time spent on farms in France during the summers, and from attending the Kinderhook Farm Camp after moving to the United States.

Upon graduating from Cornell in 1948 (including a 2 year interruption of service in the US Army), he entered graduate school in zoology where he worked in the laboratory of Professor Sanuel L. Leonard. After completing his PhD, Dr. Knobil accepted a post-doctoral position with Roy O. Greep at the Harvard School of Dental Medicine from 1951 to 1953. While a fellow, he assumed Greep's teaching duties in endocrinology and rapidly gained recognition as a gifted and scholarly teacher.

In 1953 he was appointed Instructor in the Physiology Department of the Harvard Medical School. In 1957, he was promoted to Assistant Professor after having been selected by Harvard Medical School for the prestigious Markle Scholar in Academic Medicine for the years 1956-1961.

From 1961-1981 he was the Richard Beatty Mellon Professor of Physiology, Chairman of the Department of Physiology and the Director of the Center for Research in Primate Reproduction at the University of Pittsburgh Medical School

Dr. Knobil accepted the Deanship of the University of Texas Medical School at Houston in 1981. From 1981 on he was the H. Wayne Hightower Professor in the Medical Sciences and Director of the Laboratory of the Laboratory for Neuroendocrinology at the University of Texas-Houston Health Science Center - Medical School. The Laboratory closed in 1997. More than 80 fellows and students studied in his laboratories in Boston, Pittsburgh and Houston. In 1989 he was named an Ashbel Smith Professor, the University of Texas Health Science Center.

Among the many awards, Dr. Knobil received were the highest ones awarded by the Society for the Study of Reproduction (Carl G. Hartman Award, 1983), The Endocrine Society (Fred Conrad Koch Award, 1982), and the American Physiological Society (Walter B. Cannon Memorial Lecture, 1997). He was elected to numerous positions of leadership including the Presidencies of The Endocrine Society (1976), the American Physiological Society (1979), and the International Society of Endocrinology (1984-1988). He was a member of many U.S. and foreign scientific societies' review boards, NIH study sections, and the editorial broads of numerous scientific journals.

Dr. Knobil was a member of the U.S. National Academy of Science (1986), the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a foreign associate of the French Academy of Science, the Italian National Academy of Science, and the Belgian Royal Academy of Medicine. He received several honorary degrees among them ones from the University of Bordeaux (1980), the Medical College of Wisconsin (1983), the University of Liege (1994), and the University of Milan (2000).

In addition to being the author of 217 scientific papears, he was the editor of several reference books in endocrinology and reproduction, including The Handbook of Physiology (1974), The Physiology of Reproduction (1988, 1994), and The Encyclopedia of Reproduction (1998).

Dr. Knobil died April 13, 2000 in Houston Texas. He was survived by his wife of 40 years, Dr. Julane Hotchkiss Knobil, three sons, one daughter and four grandchildren.

Adapted from the Endocrine Reviews 22(6): 721-723, 2001.

Joseph Lewis Belsky, MD

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n88636538
  • 個人
  • 1927-

Dr. Joseph Lewis Belsky was born March 14, 1927. He earned his undergraduate degree in chemistry from Drew University in New Jersey in 1949, followed by a master’s in chemistry fro Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut, in 1951 and, finally, an M.D. in 1955 from Albany Medical College in Albany, New York. He became board certified in internal medicine in 1963. He worked for a short time in private practice but spent the majority of his career as an endocrinologist in hospitals in Boston and in Connecticut. He was also a lecturer at Yale University School of Medicine.

Dr. Belsky was Chief of Medicine for the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC), a committee formed to study the long-term effects of radiation exposure on the residents of Nagasaki and Hiroshima, Japan, from 1969-1972 (the organization is now known as the Radiation Effects Research Foundation or RERF).

In 1999, Dr. Belsky was awarded a Mastership by the American College of Physicians.

Ross, Griff T.

  • 個人
  • 1920-1985

Griff Terry Ross was born 17, 1920 at Mount Enterprise, Rusk County Texas. Ross graduated from Stephen F. Austin State Teachers’ College in 1939, attended graduated school at the University of Texas at Austin briefly, then graduated from UTMB in 1945. He began his career as a “country doctor”. Ross spent 1955 to 1957 in the Air Force and then earned a Ph.D. from the Mayo Graduate School of Medicine. He began working for the National Institute of Health in 1960 as a medical officer and senior investigator and stayed twenty-one years before returning to Texas to take a position at the University of Texas Medical School. His specialty was endocrinology. He died of cancer in Houston on July 1, 1985.
For the record, his father was Griff [no middle name] Ross, MD (29 December 1880 - 15 December 1948) and his son is Griff Terry Ross, Jr., (28 December 1968 - ), not a doctor.