Houston (Tex.)

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Houston (Tex.)

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Houston (Tex.)

  • UF Houston, Texas

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Houston (Tex.)

8 Authority record results for Houston (Tex.)

8 results directly related Exclude narrower terms

Elliott, Frederick C.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n2004006056
  • Person
  • 1893-1986

Dr. Frederick C. Elliott was born in Pittsburgh, Kansas on October 26, 1893. He worked for a short time as a pharmacist.

In 1918, he received his doctorate in dentistry from Kansas City Dental College. The following year he taught at the same institution as an instructor of Histology and Clinical Dentistry. For the next four years, 1919-1923 he served as Professor of General and Dental Pathology and eventually Superintendent of Clinics at Kansas City-Western Dental College. Dr. Elliott accepted the position of Superintendent of Clinics in 1928 at the University of Tennessee, College of Dentistry. In that same year on April 28 he married Ann Orr.

Houston became Dr. Elliott's home in 1932 when he accepted a Professorship of Dental Prosthesis and Deanship at the Texas Dental College. He was instrumental in getting the Texas Dental College to become part of the University of Texas System. From 1943 to 1952 he served in both academic and administrative posts in the University's School of Dentistry.

Dr. Elliott's vision, dedication and perserverance were instrumental in the growth and development of the Texas Medical Center. He campaigned tirelessly on behalf of the Dental Branch and the Texas Medical Center. Under his leadership as Executive Director and Secretary of the Board of Directors, 1952-1963 over $120 million dollars of capital improvements were planned and completed. Even after his retirement Dr. Elliott continued to lend support and encouragement to the Texas Medical Center.

Dr. Elliott wrote and spoke extensively on the University of Texas System and the Texas Medical Center. In the 1950s and 60s Dr. Elliott, Dr. James P. Hollers and others were active participants in the structuring of the South Texas Medical Center in San Antonio.

In addition to his administrative and teaching responsibilities Dr. Elliott was an active member in many professional associations and organizations, including : American Dental Association, Tennessee State Dental Association, Houston District Dental Society - Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science - Fellow, Texas Academy of Science, Texas State Dental Society, Federation Dentaire Internationale, International Association for Dental Research. He also lent his energies and expertise to government service, civic and business organizations and hospitals.

Dr. Elliott has received numerous awards, honors and citations. The William John Gies Award (1973) from the American College of Dentists, the Gold Medal Award from the Pierre Fauchard Academy (1960), Dentist of the Century in commemoration of the Houston District Dental Society Centennial on May 16, 1959 are just a few of his earned distinctions.

Dr. Elliott was a deeply religious and patriotic individual. His concern for humanity fueled his efforts for excellence in teaching and health care systems. On December 31, 1986 the Texas Medical Center lost one of its most industrious founders

Dreizen, Samuel

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n81043291
  • Person
  • 1918-1994

Samuel Dreizen was born September 12, 1918 in New York, New York, and died April 26, 1994, in Houston, and is buried at Beth Yeshurun Cemetery in Houston. He taught at the University of Texas Dental Branch.

Levy, Barnet M.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n81050355
  • Person
  • 1917-2014

Barnet M. Levy was born in Pennsylvania in 1917. He received his AB and DDS degrees from the University of Pennsylvania and an MS degree from the Medical College of Virginia. He held positions at Medical College of Virginia, Washington University, Columbia University, National Institute of Dental Research, American Board of Pathology, Texas A&M, and many more. He came to Houston in 1957 and established the University of Texas Dental Science Institute.
[Citation: “D’Souza, R.N., P. O’Neill, H. Arzate, and P.B. Robertson. “A Tribute to the Life of Dr. Barnet M. Levy." Journal of Dental Research. SAGE Publications, July 2014. Web.PMID: 27455533. doi: 10.1177/0022034514537275]

Parris, Sam

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n86015187
  • Person

As of 2021, Sam H. Parris is a Professor Emeritus of the University of Texas Dental Branch.

Autrey, A. M., Jr.

  • Person
  • 1899-1983

Adam Manuel Autrey, Jr., was born October 31, 1899 and died June 17, 1983; he is buried in Forest Park Cemetery in Houston.

Rehrauer, Walter

  • Person
  • 1890-1981

Walter Rehrauer was born in New York City on August 3, 1890. His family moved to Houston around 1911 and he graduated from the Texas Dental College in 1914. He served in the U.S. Navy or Naval Reserve during World War I, the inter-war period, World War II and beyond. He died at Brooke Army Medical Center at Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio on March 11, 1981, and is buried at Fort Sam Houston National Cemetery.

Skjonsby, Harold S.

  • Person
  • 1937-2017

Harold S. Skjonsby, DDS, (July 6, 1937 - July 2017) served as a faculty member at the University of Texas Dental Branch at Houston in the 1960s to the 1980s. He was involved in various faculty committees, including the Evaluation Committee, Developmental Biology Committee, Cell and Tissue Biology Committee, Human Biology Committee, and the Teaching Committee. Skjonsby also served as an academic advisor to dentistry students.

Ranfranz, Oscar E.

  • Person
  • 1898-1992

Oscar Earnest Ranfranz was born 27 March 1898 in Rochester, Minnesota and died 2 April 1992 in Houston, and is buried at Forest Park Cemetery. He was a dentist and had an office in the Medical Arts Building. Dr. Ranfranz lived in Sherman, Texas, for awhile in the 1920s but had moved to Houston by 1934.

There was a Lutheran Hospital in Houston from the early 1960s to about 1990 but I was unable to find much else on it.