Houston (Tex.)

Taxonomy

Code

Scope note(s)

Display note(s)

Hierarchical terms

Houston (Tex.)

Equivalent terms

Houston (Tex.)

  • UF Houston, Texas

Associated terms

Houston (Tex.)

232 Authority record results for Houston (Tex.)

232 results directly related Exclude narrower terms

Able, Luke William

  • Person
  • 1912-2006

Luke William Able was born August 2, 1912 in Port Arthur, Texas, and his family moved to Houston when he was six. He earned his Bachelor’s from the University of Texas in 1933 and his MD from UTMB in 1940. He enlisted in 1942 while he was an intern at Hermann Hospital. Able survived a kamikaze attack on the USS Aulick in Leyte Gulf in the Pacific Theater on November 19, 1944. He suffered a shattered leg and other injuries but directed the treatment of wounded until he passed out from his own injuries. He was awarded a Silver Star and a Purple Heart and spent two years in the hospital recovering.
After the war, he trained at Children’s Hospital in Boston. He was head of the surgery department of Texas Children’s Hospital from 1954 to 1987. In 1964, he participated in one of the early separations of conjoined twins in Texas.
Dr. Able retired in 1988 due to complications from his World War II wounds. He died March 16, 2006 in Franklin, North Carolina.

Aday, Lu Ann

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n79107852
  • Person
  • 1946-

Lu Ann Aday was born in Waxahachie, Texas, on August 19, 1946. She earned her bachelor’s degree in agricultural economics in 1968 from Texas Tech University and then went to Purdue University for a Master’s in 1970 and then, in 1973, a doctorate in sociology. She was the associate director of the Center for Health Administration Studies at the University of Chicago before teaching at the University of Texas School of Public Health.

American Medical Informatics Association Nursing Informatics History Project

  • Corporate body
  • 2008 -

The American Medical Informatics Association Nursing Informatics History Project is an offshoot of the nursing informatics archive started at the National Library of Medicine by Dr. Virginia Saba in 1997. The project launched in 2008 as an endeavor to document what nursing informatics means, its history and future, and people and events that shaped the discipline. There are video interviews of important figures in nursing informatics that can be viewed through the AMIA website. There is also a list of relevant articles on the AMIA website but the articles are noted to be available at the Texas Medical Center Library. The American Nursing Association recognized nursing informatics as a new specialty in 1991.

Andrews, Billy

  • Person
  • 1956-

ertified Medical Illustrator William M. Andrews was born July 4, 1956, in Chicago, Illinois, into an Air Force family, and grew up in California, Texas, Oklahoma, and Hawaii. He earned a Bachelor’s in art from the University of Texas at Austin in 1978 and a Master’s in Biomedical Communications from the University of Texas Health Science Center at Dallas in 1980. He began his career in Tucson as a medical illustrator for the University of Arizona Health Science Center. In 1981, he moved to Houston, where he has served several institutions within the Texas Medical Center, including the Texas Heart Institute and UT MD Anderson Cancer Center. He received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Association of Medical Illustrators in 2018. At this time (2020) he has been with the Augusta University Medical College of Georgia since 1999 and is pursuing a Ph.D. in Health Promotion, Education, and Behavior through the University of South Carolina, Columbia.

Andrews, Tom A.

  • Person
  • 1903-1977

Urologist Tom Adam Andrews. Jr., was born November 26, 1903 in West Point (near La Grange), Fayette County, Texas to Tom A., Sr., and Augusta “Gussie” Rabb Andrews.. He married Helen sometime before 1930 and served in the Navy Medical Corps during World War II. He died on October 16, 1977, in Houston and is buried at Forest Park Cemetery. Note: He is listed in various places online as “Jr.” but at least one source gives his father’s middle name as Adolphus, not Adam. His older son was also Thomas Adam (1930-1991).

Armstrong, John T.

  • Person
  • 1912-1999

Dr. Armstrong is mainly associated with his involvement with Houston Hermann Hospital, The Houston Academy of Medicine, the Texas Medical Center, the Texas Medical Center Library, and has been published in the Southern Medical Journal, Journal of the Southern Medical Association. John T. Armstrong served on various committees at the Houston Academy of Medicine, where he served such appointments as president. Dr. Armstrong was heavily involved in the field of obstetrics and gynecology. His records include: his professional correspondence; his medical publications; family papers; professional diaries and ledgers; and his affiliated medical organizations’ publications.
Possibly 1912-1989, buried in Brookside Cemetery, Houston. Possible WWII military service.

Arnett, Frank C.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no98075898
  • Person
  • 1942-

Frank Couchman Arnett, Jr., was born in Salyersville, Kentucky, in 1942. He earned his M.D. from the University of Cincinnati in 1968 and then pursued internal medicine residency and rheumatology training in the 1970s at The Johns Hopkins University (JHU) School of Medicine, followed by a faculty position at JHU for 10 years.

Dr. Arnett came to the University of Texas Medical School in 1984 to become Professor of Medcine and Director of the Division of Rheumatology, a position he held until he became Chairman of the Department of Internal Medicine in 2001-2004. He served as the chief of various medical services at Memorial Hermann and The Lyndon B. Johnson Hospitals in Houston.

Dr. Arnett is internationally known as a clinician, teacher and clinical investigator. He was elected to the Association of American Physicians in 1993 and the Johns Hopkins Society of Scholars in 1995. He served on the Board of Directors of national Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society for 9 years and was national president of AOA in 1996. He also served on the American Board of Internal Medicine from 1988-1994. In 1997 he became director of the first NIH-NIAMS Specialized Centers of Research in Scleroderma, the longest continually funded SCOR in scleroderma in the nation (1997-2006).

Dr. Arnett was Co-Chairman of the Sjogren's Syndrome Study Group of the American College of Rheumatology in 1990-1991.

In 2006, he led the effort to successfully compete for one of the first 12 Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) funded by NIH/NCRR and formerly served as Principal Investigator and Executive Director of that new program, as well as the first NIH Center of Research Translation (CORT) in Scleroderma.

Dr. Arnett chaired or served on a long list of committees. He has been an invited speaker all over the world. He received numerous awards for his work, including the University of Texas Health Science Center's highest award, the President's Scholar Award for Teaching in 2005 and for Research in 2008.

Dr. Arnett was a founding member of the University of Texas Academy of Health Education Sciences and, in 2007, was elected a Master of the American College of Physicians. He has been named to both Top Doctors and Best Doctors in America since 2000.

Autrey, A. M., Jr.

  • Person
  • 1899-1983

Adam Manuel Autrey, Jr., was born October 31, 1899 and died June 17, 1983; he is buried in Forest Park Cemetery in Houston.

Autrey, A.M., Sr.

  • Person
  • 1863-1935

Dr. A.M. Autrey, Sr., was an eye, ear, nose, and throat specialist. He was born October 4, 1863, in Veracruz, Mexico. He died December 28, 1935, in Houston and is buried at Forest Park Cemetery.

Baird, Valliant Clinton

  • Person
  • 1904-1986

Valliant C. Baird MD, contributed to the organization of industrial health programs during their nascent years.

Dr. Baird was born September 28, 1904 in Pancake/Gatesville TX. He received his BS. in Pre—Med from Tulane University in 1925 having been a member of the Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor Society and Theta Kappa Psi Medical Fraternity. He was a 1928 graduate of Tulane in New Orleans, Louisiana. Dr. Baird served his internship and residency at the Mercy and Charity Hospitals in New Orleans from 1933 to 1934 He then spent some time as an oilfield physician.

Upon coming to Houston, he established his career in Industrial Medicine and as an Oilfield physician for 39 years with Humble Oil and Refining Company (currently known as Exxon Mobil). His roles include assistant chief physician in 1935 and chief physician in 1944. Dr. Baird also served as Professor of Occupational Medicine at the University Of Texas School Of Public Health in Houston and as Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine Clinical Associate Professor of Industrial Medicine in the Department of Virology and Epidemiology at Baylor School of Medicine in Houston. Dr. Baird was also President of Medical Research Foundation of Texas in 1960-61.

Papers include Dr. Baird’s resume up until 1963, the biography proof of what was published in who’s who in America, 37th Edition., newspaper clippings, medical journal articles, meeting and conference presentation notes and summaries, and pamphlets; all papers are related to either or both 1) honors and awards in the Oil and Gas Industry in particular as Chief Physician for Humble Oil and Refining Company (currently known as Exxon Mobile); and 2) industrial medicine specific to promoting physical and mental health well-being for employees and their families, which is often referred to as the Hygiene Program; the program discusses the importance of both personal and environmental hygiene.

Dr. Baird’s publications discuss the following topics: Chemical Hazards – Industry, Farm, and Home, Suicide, Paget’s disease, Coronary Artery Disease, Preventive Medicine correlates to specific age groups, plan of organization of an industrial health program, advocated pre-employment examinations, carotid sinus syndrome.

Bangs, Tina E.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n80109545
  • Person
  • 1913-1999

Tina Engdahl Bangs was born December 31, 1915 in Spokane, Washington and died in Houston on September 21, 1999. John Leslie “Jack” Bangs was born September 3, 1913 in Minot, North Dakota and died May 2, 1971. Jack served in the Navy during World War II; they are both buried in the Houston National Cemetery. They were recruited to Houston in 1951 to open a speech and hearing clinic in space donated by Methodist Hospital. The new building for the Houston Speech and Hearing Center Clinical Services opened in 1959 and was tripled in size in 1969 by the addition of a research building.

Barkley, Howard T.

  • Person
  • 1901-1981

Howard T. Barkley, Sr. was born in Tucson, AZ on November 30, 1901. He graduated from the University of Arizona in 1931 with his Bachelor's degree and the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons with a MD in 1935. He first served as an intern at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York before going to the Presbyterian Hospital, also of New York, to serve as a surgical resident. He received further training at the University of Michigan Hospital in Ann Arbor before moving permanetnly to Houston, TX in 1941.

During World War II he served as a flight surgeon for the United States Army Air Corps, reaching the rank of lieutenant colonel. He was an associate of professor of clinical surgery at Baylor College of Medicine from 1943-1980 and chief of thoracic surgery at MD Anderson Hospital from 1944-1968. Barkley also served on the staff of Hermann Hospital in Houston from 1942 to 1972, and as chief of thoracic surgery there from 1944-1968. In 1948 he was appointed chairman of the medical staff at Houston AntiTubercular Clinic. Barkley served in a variety of capacities for different regional medical organizations. Barkley served as president of the Houston Surgical Society in 1952, the Texas Tuberculosis Association from 1956-1958, the Harris County Medical Society in 1967, and the Houston chapter of the American Tuberculosis Association. He served as vice president of the National Tuberculosis Association in 1963-1964. He was a founding member of the American Association of Thoracic Surgery in 1948 and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons in 1964.

Howard T. Barkley died on January 26, 1981.

Barkley, James E.

  • Person
  • 1925-2014

James Earl Barkley, Jr., was born January 21, 1925, in Uhrichsville, Ohio. He served in Europe and Asia during World War II and was assigned for awhile to the pharmacy at Camp Cooke in Los Angeles, California. He obtained a pharmacy degree from Ohio State University in 1951 and began working for Burroughs Wellcome. He was transferred to Houston in 1961. Barkley spent five years in Washington, DC, between 1962 and 1967, but then returned to Houston. He died on March 20, 2014 and is buried at Forest Park Westheimer Cemetery.
Henry Solomon Wellcome was born August 21, 1853, in a log cabin near what would later become Almond, Wisconsin. He and Silas Mainville Burroughs formed Burroughs, Wellcome, & Co. in 1880. In 1884, they introduced to England the idea of selling medications in tablet form instead of the usual powders or liquids. They also pioneered direct marketing to doctors. Burroughs died in 1895 but the company did well under Wellcome’s direction. Wellcome became a British subject in 1910. Wellcome’s enterprises had been consolidated into the Wellcome Foundation, Ltd., in 1924 and, upon his death on July 25, 1936, this formed the foundation for the Wellcome Trust, which remains one of the world’s largest private biomedical charities.

Barnes, Frank L.

  • Person
  • 1872-1943

Frank Lister Barnes was born September 26, 1872 in Trinity, Texas, and died October 2, 1943, in Houston. Barnes graduated from Hill’s College in Waco and earned his MD from the College of Physicians and Surgeons in Baltimore, Maryland (this merged at some point with the University of Maryland School of Medicine) in 1896 and interned at Mercy Hospital. His middle name is sometimes reported to be “Lester”. He was a founding member of the Texas Surgical Society and American Board of Surgeons. He served in the Army, stationed at Galveston, during the Spanish-American War. Dr. Barnes built a hospital in Trinity in 1908 but moved to Houston in 1915. He is the father of Dr. Payton Barnes of Houston. Dr. Barnes is buried at Cedar Grove Cemetery in Trinity.
Note: Robert Howard Hill’s (1856-1919) Hill’s Business College operated in Waco from 1881 to about 1920. There is some information about it online (there were also multiple unrelated Hill’s Business Colleges operating in different states around the same time).

Barrett, Bernard M.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n83312861
  • Person
  • 1944-

Bernard M. Barrett, Jr., is a plastic surgeon. He was born May 3, 1944 and graduated from the University of Miami in 1969. He is currently in practice in Houston. His father Bernard M. Barrett, Sr., (February 4, 1917 – September 19, 2001) was an otolaryngologist in Florida.

Bates, William

  • Person
  • 1889-1974

William B. Bates was born August 16, 1889 in Nat, Texas. He and his siblings attended local schools at Nat and in a place called Red Flat. In 1910, He attended Sam Houston Normal Institute where he earned teaching certificates. After teaching for a few years, he went on to study law at the University of Texas, graduating first in the class in 1915.
Bates served in the United States Army from 1917 to 1919 during World War I. When he returned, he opened a law practice with his brother, Jesse, and married Mary Estill Dorsey. In 1923, he was hired by Fulbright and Crooker, a law firm in Houston. The title "colonel" was bestowed upon W.B. Bates by his friend, former Governor of Texas Dan Moody.
William B. Bates had an enormous impact on the growth and development of Houston, almost from the moment he arrived. He became a member of the Houston Independent School District Board of education in 1925. The University of Houston was established under his chairmanship. William B. Bates also served the Houston Chamber of Commerce for many years. He was on the advisory board of the, then famous, Bank of the Southwest.
In 1939, William B. Bates became chairman of the Board of Trustees of the M.D. Anderson Foundation upon the death of its benefactor, Mr. Anderson. Col. Bates' foresight and leadership contributed to the creation and growth of the Texas Medical Center. W.B. Bates died on April 17, 1974.
For more information about Col. Bates, please refer to N. Don Macon's book South from Flower Mountain: A Conversation with William B. Bates (Houston : Texas Medical Center, 1975)

Baun, Mara M.

  • Person
  • 1942-

Dr. Mara Madeleine Baun was born March 5, 1942, and has lived in Missouri City since 1973.

Baylor College of Medicine

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n79127036
  • Corporate body
  • 1900-

Baylor College of Medicine is a private medical school located in the Texas Medical Center. It opened in October 1900 in Dallas, Texas, by Albert Ferdinand Beddoe, A.B., M.D., and Samuel Hollingsworth Stout, A.B., M.D., as the University of Dallas Medical Department (there was no such school as the University of Dallas). In 1903 it joined with Baylor University and became the Baylor University College of Medicine. In 1943, the M.D. Anderson Foundation invited the College of Medicine to join the fledgling Texas Medical Center in Houston, so in July of that year it reopened in a former Sears, Roebuck, and Company warehouse. It moved into the current Roy and Lillie Cullen Building in 1947. Michael DeBakey joined as chair of the surgery department in 1948. The College expanded both physically and by reputation through the 1950s and 1960s.
In 1969, the College of Medicine separated from the University and officially changed its name to Baylor College of Medicine. In addition to the medical school, it has a Graduate School of Biomedical Science, the School of Allied Health Professions, and the National School of Tropical Medicine.

Baylor College of Medicine Cullen Eye Institute

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n50012460
  • Corporate body
  • 1971-

The Eye Institute was formed in 1971 with a $1 million bequest from the Cullen Foundation to augment the research, education, and patient care supplied by the Baylor Department of Ophthalmology. Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Roy Cullen had been patrons of Baylor College of Medicine since 1947; Baylor’s main building is named for them. Later gifts funded a facility in Houston Methodist Hospital in 1977. Ray K. Daily, MD, was a professor in the Baylor Department of Ophthalmology until her retirement in 1974.

Benyesh-Melnick, Matilda

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n2014191262
  • Person
  • 1926-2020

Matilda Benyesh-Melnick, MD, was born on February 7, 1926 in Russe, Bulgaria. She earned her medical degree from Hebrew University, Hadassah Medical School in 1952. She moved to Houston with her husband, Dr. Joseph L. Melnick, in 1958. In 1976 she began her residency in psychiatry at Baylor College of Medicine. At Baylor College of Medicine she held professorships in both the Department of Virology and Epidemiology as well as the Department of Psychiatry. She worked closely with her husband on his research on poliomyelitis as well as conducting her own research in myoplasma and it's relationship with cancer development in certain animals. Dr. Benyesh-Melnick died July 19, 2020, in Houston.

Bergstrom, Nancy

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n95034328
  • Person

Bertner, Ernst William

  • Person
  • 1889-1950

Dr. Ernst William Bertner was born at Colorado City, Texas, August 18, 1889. After graduating from the local high school and the New Mexico Military Institute at Roswell, New Mexico, he entered the Medical Branch of the University of Texas, Galveston, receiving his MD in 1911.

Following his graduation, he took intern and residency training at the Willard Parker Hospital, Saint Vincent's Hospital and the Manhattan Maternity Hospital, all in New York City. He came to Houston in July, 1913, where he engaged in practice until World War I, when he enlisted in the Medical Corps.

He was assigned to the British Army, and went overseas in July, 1917. In March, 1918, he was transferred to the American Expeditionary Force, and assigned to Headquarters Medical and Surgical Consultants at Newfchateau, France.

Dr. Bertner had a varied and exciting career in France and served actively on most of the front lines. He was wounded by shrapnel and confined to a hospital for a short period of time. He was soon returned to duty. At one time he was caught in one of the famous German pincers movements and was one of the few surviving Medical Officers.

He was discharged from the Army in June, 1919, at Camp Dix, New Jersey with the rank of Major. The following month he resumed his practice in Houston. In May 1921, he went to Baltimore, Maryland, for post-graduate work at Johns Hopkins Hospital, in surgery, gynecology, and urology. He resumed practice in Houston in May 1922, and since that time limited his work to surgery and gynecology.

He was married at St. Louis, November 30, 1922, to Miss Julia Williams, daughter of the late W.E. Williams formerly General Manager of the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railroad in Texas.

Dr. Bertner was always an active member of organized medicine, in the county, state and national organizations and served as seventy-second president of Texas State Medical Association. He served as President of the Harris County Medical Society, President of the Post Graduate Medical Assembly of South Texas, President of the Texas Surgical Society, and President of the Texas Association of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

He was a member of the Executive Committee of the Central Association of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. He was State Counsellor and a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons. He was a member of the American Medical Association, American Urological Association, American Gynecological Association, Central Association of Gynecologists, and Interurban Gynecological Society.

Dr. Bertner was active in hospital organization, having formerly been Chief of Staff of Jefferson Davis Hospital in Houston, and very active in building the first unit of that institution. Later, he became identified with Hermann Hospital and did much towards the development of the institution, where he served as Chief of Staff. He was also on the Surgical Staff of Memorial Hospital and Southern Pacific Hospital in Houston.

He served as Vice-Chairman of the Houston Board of Health and Executive Committeeman of the Texas Social Hygiene Association. He was a member of the First Presbyterian Church in Houston, a 32nd degree Mason, Knight Templar, Shriner and Knight Commander of the Court of Honor of the Scottish Rite, and a member of the Houston Club, Ramada Club, and Houston Country Club.

Dr. Bertner was one of the founders of the Texas Medical Center and was its first president from 1945-1950. He was named by the University of Texas as acting director of the M.D. Anderson Hospital for Cancer Research when that institution was conceived. He was responsible for the professional organization and the operation of the hospital for the first four years of its existence. He served as professor and chairman of the department of gynecology for the Baylor College of Medicine since its establishment in Houston from 1943 until his death in 1950.

During World War II he was in command of the Emergency Medical Service of the Office of Civilian Defense, and received a Presidential Citation for this service.

Dr. Bertner was a past Vice-President of the American Cancer Society and served on its Board for several years. He was chairman of the Executive Committee of the Texas Division and received the American Cancer Society award for distinguished service in cancer control in 1949. He was a member of the Board of Directors of the Houston Chamber of Commerce. He was a member of the Citizen's Committee for Reorganization of the Executive Branch of the Government, an outgrowth of the Hoover Commission Report.

Dr. Bertner died July 28, 1950 in Houston following a two year battle with cancer. He was survived by his wife, Julia Williams Bertner, two sisters and a niece.

Beta Beta Houston

  • Corporate body
  • 1969-

Texas Woman's University (TWU), College of Nursing began in the fall of 1954, received accreditation from the National League of Nursing in May 1958. Beta Beta Chapter was officially recognized as a chapter, by TWU, in October 1969. The inaugural inductions were held the spring of 1970. The mission of the organization is to support the learning knowledge, and professional development of nurses committed to making a difference in health worldwide. The society vision is to create a global community of nurses who lead in using knowledge, scholarship, service and learning to improve the health of the world’s people. [Source: Beta Beta Houston, Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing. (2010). Retrieved from http://www.betabetahouston.org/ on November 5, 2011.]

Bickel, Laura C.

  • Person
  • 1912-1977

Laural Carnell Bickel was born in Shamokin, Pennsylvania, on June 2, 1912. She was educated at University of Wisconsin Medical School, (now the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health) and moved to Houston in the early 1940s. She was a pediatrician and did considerable work in both rubella and in congenital diseases. Dr. Bickel died in Houston on December 15, 1977.

Blair, Robert K.

  • Person
  • 1912-2007

Born October 12, 1912 in Chillicothe, Texas, and raised in nearby Vernon. Blair graduated from the Rice Institute in 1933 and from UTMB in 1937. After a two-year internship at Jefferson Davis Hospital, Blair served as medical director of the Texas Prison System from 1939 to 1944. He practiced briefly in Wharton before moving to Houston in 1945. He was an on-call physician for the Todd Shipyards from 1944 to 1947 and taught anatomy at the Texas Dental College from 1947 to 1950. Blair served as president of the Harris County Medical Society in 1961. He was joined in practice by his son-in-law, C. Frank Webber, in 1964 and retired in 1976. He was the medical director of the Philadelphia Insurance Company’s Southwest Division until his full retirement in 1998. He was also active in numerous social, professional, and philanthropical organizations. He died December 21, 2007.

Blattner, Russell J.

  • Person
  • 1908-2002

Russell John Blattner was born July 3, 1908, in St. Louis, Missouri and attended Washington University there. He received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1929, and his Doctor of Medicine degree in 1933. He took his hospital training with an internship at Barnes Hospital in St. Louis, and his residency at St. Louis Children's Hospital, and then at Princess Elizabeth of York Hospital for Children in London, England. He returned to St. Louis and in 1937, began his teaching career as an Instructor in the Department of Pediatrics in the Washington University School of Medicine. In 1940 he was promoted to the rank of Assistant Professor in his department. Three years later, in 1945, he advanced to the rank of Associate Professor.

His career in Houston began in 1947 when he was given the position of Professor of Pediatrics and Chairman of the Department of Pediatrics at Baylor College of Medicine. He was actively involved with the creation of the Texas Children's Hospital, beginning in 1948 when with architects he toured hospitals in Canada, Mexico and the United States in search of ideas for the soon-to-be-built Houston institution. His efforts came to fruition in 1954, when the new pediatric hospital opened its doors. Dr. Blattner worked continually to insure the success and development of Texas Children's Hospital as a sub-specialty hospital care hospital for children and as a teaching and research institution, and to promote excellent pediatric care throughout the Texas Medical Center, as well as in Harris County by developing an affiliation between Baylor and the city and county health departments. He helped to establish the Blue Bird Clinic at The Methodist Hospital, and was instrumental in securing the initial funding for the South Western Poliomyelitis Center which would later become the Texas Institute for Rehabilitation and Research.

Dr. Blattner had a long and distinguished career for which he often received recognition from his colleagues within the medical profession. In 1956 the Washington University School of Medicine Alumni awarded him their Alumni Citation for Outstanding Achievements and Service He was also designated Distinguished Service Professor at Baylor in 1968. In 1971 he was given the newly established J.S. Abercrombie Chair in the department of Pediatrics at Baylor. He was honored again in 1972 and in 1974, when he received the Outstanding Faculty Award from the Baylor College of Medicine Alumni Association and the American Medical Association's Abraham Jacobi Award. He became Emeritus Chief of Pediatrics at Hermann Hospital. He retired in 1977, but continued his affiliation with the Texas Medical Center by acting as a consultant to hospital and college, and as Distinguished Service Professor of Pediatrics at Baylor. In his retirement years he became affiliated with the Well Baby Clinics for the City of Houston Health Department, where he continued his care for the pediatric subject and his academic interests by training Baylor students assigned to the clinics.

Dr. Blattner served his profession not only as an administrator and teacher but as a research scientist as well. He made major contributions in the field of infectious disease, most notably in the study of encephalitis. He was, moreover, noted for his concern and compassion because he ''combined specialization with old-time empathy and concern with each patient (WATCH, Spring 1977). He died December 6, 2002, in Gaithersburg, Maryland.

Bloom, Samuel

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n2001004825
  • Person
  • 1921-2006

Boutwell, Bryant

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n99804345
  • Person

Dr. Bryant Boutwell was the Associate Vice President for Accreditation and International Programs at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. He held John P. McGovern, M.D. Professorship in Oslerian Medicine at the UT Medical School at Houston.

Brewer, Earl J.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n81090481
  • Person
  • 1928-2015

Earl J. Brewer, MD was a pioneer of pediatric rheumatology locally, nationally, and internationally. He founded and was chair of the pediatric department of Kelsey Seybold Clinic for 22 years; founded and was chair of the Rheumatology Section and Division at Texas Children's Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine for 30 years; and was also a clinical professor at Baylor. Earl was a prolific writer, and authored many medical papers and several medical, nonfiction, and fiction books.

Born in Fort Worth, Texas, on July 3, 1928, Earl grew up in North Texas, graduating from Arlington Heights High School in 1945. He attended The University of Texas in Austin for a year and a half followed by a year and a half in the United States Regular Army. After his army service, he worked at night as a hospital laboratory technician in Fort Worth at All Saints Hospital while he attended Texas Christian University, graduating in 1950.

In 1954, Earl graduated from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, aided by scholarships from the Jesse H. and Mary Gibbs Jones scholarship. He received specialty training in pediatrics at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston and Harvard Medical School in Boston.

Earl's professional career spanned 32 years, beginning with a small-town medical practice in Wharton, Texas. As founder and chair of the pediatric department of the Kelsey-Seybold Clinic, he directed the development of that department from 1961 to 1983. In addition, he was a leader both nationally and internationally in clinical research and educational/service projects for such organizations as the National Institutes of Health, the Food and Drug Administration, and the Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Department of Health and Human Services. As a pioneer in pediatric rheumatology, he developed and directed as clinical professor, the Pediatric Rheumatology Center and Section at both the Pediatric Department of Baylor College of Medicine and the Texas Children's Hospital from 1958 to 1988.

Earl wrote what were definitive books on juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, which were translated into several languages. He was a leader involved with several important stepping stones necessary for the development of pediatric rheumatology, including the writing of the criteria used in the diagnosis of JRA, founding and chairing the Pediatric Rheumatology Collaborative Study Group, organizing and chairing the Rheumatology Section of the American Academy of Pediatrics, and helping to organize and chairing the pediatric component of the American College of Rheumatology. He also was responsible for the pediatric rheumatology portion of the NIH, USA-USSR scientific cooperation program.

He worked with the National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases from 1975 to 1992 as principal investigator for four studies by 20 centers in the USA and 5 centers in the USSR concerned with arthritis in children. As founder and chairman of the Pediatric Rheumatology Collaborative Study Group he directed over 15 multicenter studies of anti-arthritis medicines resulting in approval of several new drugs by the FDA. His last study was of methotrexate in children with JRA in both the USA and USSR funded principally by the FDA and the USSR and was published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Earl was a member of the Arthritis Advisory Committee of the Food and Drug Administration from 1976 to 1980.

In 1984, Earl and other individuals interested in forming a parent/child/health professional organization for the purpose of learning together pioneered the first American Juvenile Arthritis Organization meeting in Keystone, Colorado. The meeting is now the largest of the Arthritis Foundation meetings.

Earl worked hard to promote better coordination of care, services and case management for children with chronic illness or disabling conditions. From 1986 to 1990, he worked full time with the DHHS Maternal and Child Health Bureau and Dr. C. Everett Koop, the Surgeon General, to facilitate development of family-centered, community-based coordinated care for children with special needs. With others, he actively developed the Family-to-Family Network to provide support, information, and referral for families with special needs children.

He published 200 peer-reviewed papers, books, abstracts, chapters, monographs, and pamphlets including two medical movies. He received numerous awards, including the Surgeon General's Exemplary Service Award, presented to him on September 7, 1988 by Dr. C. Everett Koop. The Arthritis Foundation and the American Juvenile Arthritis Organization created an annual award in Earl's name that is given yearly to a health professional who has made an outstanding contribution to the care of children with arthritis. The American Academy of Pediatrics created the Earl Brewer Travel Award that is given to an outstanding Pediatric Rheumatology Fellow for a research project yearly at the section's annual meeting.

After retiring from the practice of medicine in 1990, Earl wrote fiction and nonfiction full time, including Parenting a Child with Arthritis (co-authored), The Arthritis Source Book, and a novel, Picking Up The Marbles. Earl was a member of a number of civic and social organizations, and particularly loved his long association with The Tuesday Morning Breakfast Club and the Forest Club and the many close friends he had in those places.

He died on March 19, 2015 in Houston, Texas at the age of 86

Published in Houston Chronicle on Mar. 22, 2015, http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/houstonchronicle/obituary.aspx?pid=174451931

Bruch, Hilde, 1904-1984

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n50055887
  • Person
  • 1904-1984

Hilde Bruch was born in Dulken, Germany on March 11, 1904; her family was Jewish. An uncle encouraged her to study medicine and she graduated from Albert Ludwig University with a doctorate in 1929. She took academic and research positions with the University of Kiel and then the University of Leipzig, but left academia for private pediatric practice in 1932 because of rising anti-Semitism. She had already begun a career in pediatric physiology before she left Germany in 1933 after Hitler came into power. She then spent a year in England, where she worked at the East End Maternity Hospital, which served a Jewish community in an impoverished part of London. She moved to the United States in 1934 and worked at the Babies’ Hospital at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in New York City. She obtained her American medical license in 1935 and, in 1937, began research on childhood obesity, the beginning of her career studying eating disorders. She became an American citizen in 1940.
From 1941 to 1943 Bruch studied psychiatry at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore before returning to New York to open her own psychiatric practice and teach at Columbia University. She took a position in psychiatry at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston in 1964 and remained in Houston for the rest of her life. She died on December 15, 1984.

Buja, Louis Maximilian

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n82138621
  • Person
  • 1942 -

Born December 30, 1942 in New Orleans, Louisiana. He attended Jesuit High School and then graduated in 1964 from Loyola University with a BS in biology. He earned his MD with honors from Tulane University in 1967, with an additional MS in anatomy in 1968. Dr. Buja worked for the National Institute of Health between 1968 and 1974, when he moved to the department of pathology at the University of Texas Southwest Medical Center in Dallas. In 1989 he was appointed chair of the pathology department of the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, where he became dean in 1996.

Burdon, Kenneth L.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2011184007
  • Person
  • 1895-1985

Kenneth Livingston Burdon, MD, was born in Providence, Rhode Island in 1895. He was educated at Brown University, receiving his Ph.D. in 1922. Dr. Burdon served with the U.S. Army Sanitary Medical Corps, (1918-1919), taught at Washington University School of Medicine (1922-1935) and then at Louisiana State University School of Medicine (1935-1943). Kenneth Burdon, MD is recognized as the Founding Chair of the Department of Microbiology Baylor University College of Medicine (1943-1961). He was awarded Professor Emeritus of Microbiology in 1961.

Dr. Burdon’s research and publications feature the following topics: “characterization of a group of aerobic spore-forming bacilli, especially Bacillus anthracis, and on immediate-type hypersensitivity. He also worked on development of an antibiotic to treat tuberculosis. He was a director of an NIH-supported Fellowship Training Program in Allergy and Immunology in conjunction with the Department of Pediatrics from 1958 to 1967. Dr. Burdon authored six editions of a widely used textbook Microbiology, first published in 1939. He also authored a Medical Microbiology textbook.”

Dr. Burdon retired in 1967 and passed away in 1985. Further information and a bibliography of Dr. Burdon’s papers are available in the first folder of this collection.

Citation:"Kenneth L. Burdon, Founding Chair, Microbiology." Baylor College of Medicine. Accessed February 21, 2016. https://www.bcm.edu/departments/molecular-virology-and-microbiology/about-us/history-of-the-department/kenneth-l-burdon.

Busch, Harris

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n79039895
  • Person
  • 1923-2006

Harrison “Harris” Busch, MD, PhD, was born in Chicago on May 23, 1923. He served in the US Army during World War II and attended medical school at the University of Illinois, followed by an internship at Cook County Hospital. He also earned a Ph.D. in biochemistry from the University of Wisconsin in 1952. After teaching at Yale and (University of?) Illinois, he moved to Houston in 1960 to become a professor of pharmacology at Baylor College of Medicine. He stayed at Baylor until he retired in 1998. Busch was interested in the function of mRNA in producing proteins within cells. He died in Houston on September 22, 2006 and is buried at Adath Emeth Cemetery in Houston.

Cady, Lee D.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2004020308
  • Person
  • 1896-1987

Lee D. Cady, MD (1896-1987) graduated Washington School of Medicine in 1922. He served in both World War I and World War II. During World War II he served as the commanding officer of the 21st General Hospital in Northern Africa and Europe. Upon returning home after World War II, he assumed the role of director of the V.A. Hospitals in Dallas then Houston before his retirement from the Houston V.A. Hospital in 1963. He is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.

Catlin, Francis

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2010040748
  • Person
  • 1925-2014

Francis Irving Catlin was born on December 6, 1925 in Hartford, Connecticut. He received his Doctor of Medicine degree in 1948 from Johns Hopkins University, where he also served two residencies in otolaryngology and head and neck surgery. Dr. Catlin served in the U.S. Air Force Medical Corps from 1950-1952 at the rank of Captain and was the Assistant Chief of E.N.T. Service, U.S. Air Force, 1100th Medical Group, Bolling Air Force Base in Washington, D.C. Dr. Catlin taught and conducted research as a faculty member at Johns Hopkins from 1955-1972. There, he was a part of the Department of Otolaryngology in the School of Medicine, the School of Public Health and Hygiene’s Environmental Medicine Department, and the Public Administration. In 1972 Dr. Catlin and his family moved to Houston, Texas, where he accepted the appointments as Professor at the Baylor College of Medicine in the Department of Otorhinolaryngology; as Chief-of-Service in the department of Otolaryngology at St. Luke’s Episcopal the and Texas Children’s Hospitals; and as the Director of the Speech, Language, and Learning Disorders at the Texas Children’s Hospital. Dr. Catlin died Februayr 24, 2014 and is buried in Church Hill, Maryland. Print finding aid by Margaret Irwin, 1992/1996

Chapman, Don

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n99254652
  • Person
  • 1916-2007

Donald Wilton Chapman was born in Bridgewater, Iowa, on May 21, 1916 and earned both his BA and MD from the University of Iowa. He served as a major in the US Army Medical Corps in the European Theater during World War II. Chapman moved to Houston in 1944 to become one of the ten original faculty members of Baylor College of Medicine. He taught and practiced for fifty years, was a member of numerous professional organizations, and taught as a visiting professor in medical schools around the United States and the world. The Harris County Medical Society awarded him the John P. McGovern Compleat Physician Award in 1976. Dr. Chapman died on May 3, 2007 in Houston.

Charalampous, Kanellos D.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2010152895
  • Person
  • 1931-

Dr. Kanellos Charalampous was born in Greece in 1931. He attended Texas Christian University and majored in biology and chemistry. Later, he was accepted into Baylor College of Medicine. He began his rotating internship at Houston City Hospital and began his residency at Baylor. In his post-graduate career, he worked in the development and research of psychopharmacology. [Citation: Biographies, and 2015 December 24. KANELLOS CHARALAMPOUS: CONFRONTING THE ZEITGEIST by Barry Blackwell and Kanellos Charalampous (2015): 1-27. International Network for the History of Neuropsychopharmacology. 24 Dec. 2015. Web.]

Children's Nutrition Research Center

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n88669068
  • Corporate body
  • 1978-

The Children’s Nutrition Research Center was created in 1978 as a joint venture among Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children’s Hospital, and the USDA Agricultural Research Service. It is one of six USDA nutritional research centers. The CNRC’s areas of study are nutritional metabolism in mothers, infants, and children; childhood obesity prevention; pediatric clinical nutrition; molecular, cellular, and regulatory aspects of nutrition during development; and developmental determinants of obesity in infants and children.

City of Houston Department of Public Health and Planning

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n50029268
  • Corporate body

Houston Health Department Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Research for Effectiveness (OPERE) (2006), “comprises epidemiologists, statisticians, and GIS analysts who collaborate with . . . partners within and outside the department for research, analysis, interpretation, and sharing of information on health issues that affect our communities”. The Houston Health Department operates several community health centers and provides information on assistance with various health needs, including PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) for those at elevated risk of contracting HIV, or PEP (post-exposure prophylaxis) for those who may recently have been exposed).

Clark, Nancy Vecera

  • Person

Nancy Vecera Clark worked in the Development Office of Hermann Hospital Estate from 1979 to 1986. In 1981 her title was Research Specialist, Development and Marketing; by 1982 her title was Development Coordinator. Her involvement included donor relations, fundraising, and historical research. During her time at Hermann, Charles R. Stricklin was Director of Development. Nancy would go on to serve as Director of Development at the University of Houston.

Clark, Randolph Lee, 1906-

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n50039822
  • Person
  • 1906-1994

Randolph Lee Clark was born July 2, 1906 to Randolph Lee Clark, Sr., teacher and president of several Texas colleges including Texas Christian University, and Leni Leoti Sypert, musician and teacher. As the son and grandson of college presidents, he lived with role models whose optimistic outlook and ideals nurtured his untiring ability to work toward the goal of containing and possibly curing cancer. After his father’s death, he preferred to be known as R. Lee Clark.

Dr. Clark’s early medical career as Chief Resident at the American Hospital in Paris and as a Fellow at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota laid the foundation for concepts that became the cornerstone of the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas. His military service enabled him to meet surgeons and physicians from throughout the United States and to exchange ideas and plans for postwar institutions. He was appointed Director of Surgical Research for the U.S. Army (Air) Medical Corps as well as Consultant to the Air Surgeon General. Clark’s successes were recognized by the Regents of the University of Texas and in 1946 he was asked to develop what would become the nation’s first cancer hospital within a university system.

In Houston, he started work with 22 employees in the house and stables cum carriage-house of a donated family estate. The stables housed research laboratories for biochemistry and biology. Dr. Clark located surplus Army barracks, had them moved to the estate grounds, and converted them to a clinic. During this time, employees, including some ex-military associates, were recruited to expand M.D. Anderson Hospital. A story then circulating told of one employee asking another if he had noticed how ‘vague’ Dr. Clark was when discussing salaries, benefits, laboratory space, and other necessities. The second employee replied, “Oh, no, ‘vague’ is much too precise a word.”

Lee Clark had vision, energy, and the ability to inspire the generosity of major businessmen in Houston and citizens throughout Texas. The M.D. Anderson Foundation was also a benefactor. At that time, the Texas Medical Center was expanding and M.D. Anderson Hospital became one of its cornerstones. Dr. Clark collaborated with city, state, and eventually national and international leaders in medicine whose intent was to consider the problem of “incurable” cancer patients and to find a solution.

Clark married Bertha Margaret Davis, MD, an anesthesiologist from Asheville, North Carolina, on June 11, 1932. They had two children, Randolph Lee and Rabia Lynn. Lee Clark died May 3, 1994.

For more information, please consult:

Cancer Bulletin 31, no.2 (1979) : special edition.

“Contemporaries: Randolph Lee Clark, M.D.” Modern Medicine Publications, 30 Oct. 1972, 35-37.

The First Twenty Years, of the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute. Houston, TX: U.T. M.D. Anderson Hosptial and Tumor Institute, 1964.

LeMaistre, Charles A, MD. “R. Lee Clark in memoriam.” Cancer, 74, no. 4 (1994) : 1513-15.

Macon, N. Don. Clark and the Anderson: a personal profile. Houston, TX: Texas Medical Center, 1976.

“M.D. Anderson’s R. Lee Clark.” Mayo Alumnus, April 1969, 14-15.

Cody, Claude C. III

  • Person
  • 1915-1997

Claude Carr Cody III was born December 10, 1915, in Temple, Texas, and died November 14, 1997, in (Houston?) Harris County. He was the grandson and nephew of the first two Claude Codys; Claude, Jr., had no children. Cody was an ear, nose, and throat specialist. He graduated from the University of Texas Medical Branch in 1939 and interned at Multnomah County Hospital in Portland, Oregon, per his World War II draft card.

Cole, Thomas R.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n85123512
  • Person
  • 1949-

Thomas R. Cole was born in 1949 in New Haven, Connecticut. He graduated with his bachelor’s in Philosophy from Yale University in 1971, and he would finish his Master’s in History in 1975 at Wesleyan University. Dr. Cole obtained his PhD. in History from the University of Rochester in 1981.

Dr. Cole has held many faculty positions at various universities throughout his career. The bulk of his work and research was and is conducted between 1982-2019 at the University of Texas Medical Branch. He has worked in several departments: the Institute for Medical Humanities, School of Public Health, Department of Family Medicine, Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, Institute for the Medical Humanities, and the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences. His research conducted here has been dedicated to the writing of several articles, books, and films on Aging and (Humanistic) Gerontology. Dr. Cole’s work is concerned with how society and the medical field view Aging and the ethical practice of medicine, especially within Geriatrics. He has published several books and articles on Aging that have been published in a variety of medical journals and international publications. Dr. Cole’s work also reflects the passion he has for autobiography and the telling of an individual’s ‘story.’ Cole has hosted several writing workshops and other programs to help people record their life’s memories. This passion has also led him to produce films such as The Strange Demise of Jim Crow and books such as No Color is My Kind: The Life of Eldrewey Stearns and the Desegregation of Houston. He has earned numerous awards and mentions for his extensive work.

As of 2020, Dr. Cole was the McGovern chair in the Medical Humanities Department as well as the Director of the McGovern Center for Humanities and Ethics at the University of Texas Health Science Center. He has served on several committees. Dr. Cole plans to publish Old Man Country: My Search for Meaning Among the Elders in the Fall of 2019; this book’s research materials are now found within his papers.

Cooley, Denton A., 1920-2016

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n79078765.html
  • Person
  • 1920-2016

Dr. Denton A. Cooley, the founder of the Texas Heart Institute, attended the University of Texas and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, where he graduated in 1944. After serving in the Army Medical Corps and studying with Lord Russell Brock in London, he returned to his hometown of Houston, Texas to teach surgery at Baylor College of Medicine in the 1950s. The Texas Heart Institute was founded on August 3, 1962 in order to research and treat cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death in the United States. Among many innovations developed by Cooley and his colleagues at the Institute are the first implantation of an artificial heart, the first successful heart transplant in the United States, advances in treatment of congenital defects, and a number of prostheses and implants. The Institute is part of Texas Medical Center, the largest medical center in the word. CHI St. Luke’s Health – Baylor St. Luke’s Medical Center is the Institute’s clinical partner. [Sources: Texas Heart Institute website; The Houston Review, vol. 2, no. 1, p.16-19]

Cooper, Alan B.

  • Person
  • 1928-2002

Alan Bruce Cooper was born in New York, New York on August 19, 1928. He earned a BS in 1949 and a Master’s in immunogenetics in 1951 from Wesleyan University, followed by an MD in 1955 from New York Medical School. After serving as chief of pathology at Harvard University, he joined the Air Force. After his discharge as a major, he taught at Baylor College of Medicine and New Orleans Psychoanalytic Institute in psychiatry and psychoanalysis. He was also in private practice in Houston between 1968 and 1985. In 1986, Dr. Cooper was appointed medical director of the University of Texas Adult Ambulatory Psychiatric Services and was later a professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. He died in Houston on December 29, 2002, of lung cancer.

Copeland, Donna R.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n82147433
  • Person

(Born circa 1950) Dr. Copeland attended the University of Houston from 1968 to 1972 before graduating cum laude from Rice University in psychology in 1975. She completed a Master’s in 1978 and a Ph.D. in 1979, both from the University of Houston. From 1979 to 2003 she was chief of the Behavioral Medicine Section of the Department of Pediatrics at UT MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Copeland, Murray M.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2018054171
  • Person
  • 1902-1982

Murray Marcus Copeland was born June 23, 1902, in Georgia, and died April 2, 1982, in Easton, Texas, although he lived in Houston at the time. Copeland was a professor of surgery at UT MD Anderson Cancer Center from 1960 to 1982. He had been chair of Georgetown University’s medical school from 1947 to 1960 and was president of the American Cancer Society from 1964 to 1965. Dr. Copeland graduated from Oglethorpe University in 1923 and earned his MD from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1927. He also trained in surgery at the Mayo Clinic Memorial Hospital for Cancer in New York City. He served in medical corps in the Pacific Theater during World War II and was awarded a Legion of Merit. Copeland has an entry in the Handbook of Texas Online.

Creson, Daniel Lenard

  • Person
  • 1935-2015

Born in 1935, Dr. Daniel L. Creson was in in private practice with North Texas Psychiatry and Psychotherapy in Denton, Texas. He was Professor Emeritus at The University of Texas Health Science Center - Houston in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. He served there as Clinical Professor and Director of Continuing Education before his retirement in 2003. He was Board Certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology in 1971.

Dr. Creson received his medical degree from The University of Texas Medical Branch-Galveston, Texas in 1962. He earned an MA in Behavioral Science and a PhD in Anthropology from Rice University, Houston Texas. He holds academic appointments at Galveston Family Institute, The University of Texas Medical Branch - Galveston and The University of Texas Health Science Center - Houston. Among his past positions, he served as Adjunct Associate Professor at Tulane University, Executive Director of Gulf Coast Regional Mental Health-Mental Retardation Center, and Medical Director of Mental Health Mental Retardation Authority of Harris County.

Dr. Creson was active on several boards of mental health mental retardation organizations in Galveston and Houston as well as several committees for the Texas Society of Psychiatric Physicians. He has been a member of the Crisis Response Consortium of Harris County and Burn Disaster Response Team for Shriners Burn Institute. In addition to his past work in crisis situations throughout the world, he continues to serve as consultant to Humanitarian Aid and Medical Development (HMD) and Christian Children's Fund. Dr. Creson was instrumental in the development of an historical archives project, which seeks to document the history of mental health services in Texas. He personally obtained oral histories from many psychiatrists and other professionals throughout Texas.

Dr. Creson died November 30, 2015, in Sanger, Texas.

De Hartog, Jan

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n78095785
  • Person
  • 2014-2002

Jan de Hartog was born April 22, 1914 in Haarlem, Netherlands. He ran away as a young teenager and took jobs on fishing boats, as a coal shoveler, and as a tour boat captain. He wrote in his spare time, published a series of mystery novels, and started a career in theater in the late 1930s.
In May 1940, ten days before Germany invaded, de Hartog published Holland’s Glory, a novel about ocean-going tugboat captains. The book was not political but because of the title and thoroughly-Dutch subject it became a bestseller and drew the attention of the Gestapo. De Hartog had already joined the Dutch resistance movement and had to flee to England, where he continued resistance work alongside like-minded British. He eventually became a pacifist and joined the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers). His years in England introduced his work to English-language audiences and he produced several successful books and plays.
De Hartog moved to the United States in the late 1950s and married his third wife, Marjorie Hein. In the early 1960s, the de Hartogs and others became aware of the poor conditions at Jefferson Davis Hospital and the ongoing dispute over whether the city or county was responsible for its funding. The expose The Hospital spurred the formation of the Harris County Hospital District (now Harris Health System).
De Hartog died September 22, 2002, in Houston. He and Marjorie were long-time members of Houston’ Live Oak Friends Meeting. This VHS was donated by the Drexler family, who were also members of LOFM; their daughter Alethea was an assistant at the John P. McGovern Historical Collections at the Texas Medical Center Library.

Denham, Leta Elizabeth

  • Person
  • 1895-1982

Leta Elizabeth Denham was born in 1895 in Hempstead, Waller County, Texas, and was one of sixteen children. She attended the Baptist Sanitarium and Hospital Training School for Nurses in Houston, Texas, graduating from the program in 1919. The commencement ceremony was held at First Baptist Church in Houston on May 29, 1919. After graduating from nursing school Leta Denham went to China to fulfill her life-long dream of working as a missionary. She served as a medical missionary in Yingtak, China from 1921 to 1922.

Leta Denham married Marcus Jackson Scott in June 1921, and died in Langley, Washington in 1982.

Desmond, Murdina MacFarquhar

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n94801680
  • Person
  • 1916-2003

Dr. Desmond was born in the Hebrides Islands of Scotland in 1916. Her family immigrated to the United States when she was 7. She attended Smith College on scholarship, graduating in 1938, and obtained her M.D. in 1942 from Temple School of Medicine. Following her internship and six months of pediatric residency, Dr. Desmond joined the U.S. Naval Reserve as a physician and actively served through World War II, including time at Pearl Harbor.

Postwar, she completed her pediatric training and a fellowship in newborn research. In 1948, she moved to Houston, Texas to join the faculty of Baylor College of Medicine in the Pediatric Department which at that time consisted of four faculty members and two residents. In 1950, Baylor became affiliated with the former Jefferson Davis Hospital and a newborn service was established. Dr. Desmond became the first head of the newborn care section in the Pediatric Department.

In 1956, Dr. Desmond and two other physicians were alarmed at the death rate from staphylococcus infections at Jefferson Davis Hospital, the then city-county hospital. The doctors declared the nursery unsafe and closed it to any more admissions. Shortly thereafter, Dr. Desmond began the first neonatal intensive care unit in the nation at the hospital. Dr. Desmond also worked with infants born with drug addictions. She developed the transitional nursery in which at risk infants were under close observation for potential medical problems. Infants who were seriously ill were placed in a separate unit, which became the first newborn intensive care unit in the southwestern states of the United States. Until Jefferson Davis Hospital closed, Dr. Desmond served as director of nurseries and as pediatric coordinator of its Maternal and Infant Care project.

During the outbreak of rubella in 1963-64, Dr. Desmond worked with about 200 affected infants and children. She recognized that many at-risk infants, whom medical care was able to save, developed conditions that required comprehensive evaluation and long-term care. In 1973 she became the director of the Leopold Meyer Center for Developmental Pediatrics at Texas Children's hospital. During this period she was on the team which cared for David Vetter, the "Bubble Boy." The Desmond Neonatal Developmental Follow-up Clinic, named for Dr. Desmond, was established in 1994 to provide logitudinal follow-up and neurodevelopmental assessments for pre-term babies.

Dr. Desmond received the Apgar Award from the American Academy of Pediatrics; the Stanley Kalinski Award from the Texas Pediatric Society; and awards from Smith College and Temple University among others.

Dr. Desmond married James L. Desmond who she met while serving in the Naval Reserve. They were married after the war and then moved to Houston, Texas, where her husband had a dental practice until his death in 1969. She and her husband had two children. Dr. Desmond passed away in 2003.

Detering, Herman E., III

  • Person
  • 1938-2015

Herman Eberhard Detering, III, was born July 2, 1938, in Houston; his father H.E. Detering, Jr. (1902-1977) was also born in Houston and his grandfather H.E. Detering, Sr. (1862-1927), was born in Germany but came to Houtson in 1871. Detering, Sr., was the founder of The Detering Company Building Supplies, which is still operated (as of 2020) by the family. H.E. Detering, III, created this collection because of his interest in 19th century photography and psychiatry. Mr. Detering was the longtime owner of the Detering Book Gallery, a rare bookstore in the Houston area. He died March 21, 2015

Diagnostic Clinic of Houston

  • Corporate body
  • 1957-

The Diagnostic Clinic of Houston was established in 1957 when the nine founding members joined together to form a group practice. This organization was conceived in an attempt to provide the patients with the highest quality health care. It focuses primarily on internal medicine, with many subspecialties. (Source: http://www.diagnosticclinic.com/professionals-clinic-history)

Dippel, A. Louis

  • Person
  • 1901-1991

Adelbert Louis Dippel was born in Ehlinger (now Ellinger), Texas, near LaGrange in Fayette County, on July 10, 1901. His grandparents all emigrated from Germany around 1850. His family wanted him to become an engineer but he had decided on medicine when he was twelve and admired the family doctor who treated him for malaria. He attended Blinn College in Brenham before earning both a B.S. and an M.S. from the University of Texas in 1924, then an MD from UTMB in 1928. Renal calculi kept him out of the service during World War II. Dr. Dippel was an instructor and associate professor in obstetrics at Johns Hopkins University from 1934 to 1940, then at the University of Minnesota from 1940 to 1943; he was head of that department in 1943 and 1944. He then returned to Texas to take positions at Baylor College of Medicine and UTMB, where he remained until he retired in 1977. He died in Tacoma, Washington, on September 6, 1991.

Dmochowski, Leon

  • Person
  • 1909-1981

Leon Dmochowski was a virologist, experimental oncologist, and academic born on July 1, 1909 in Ternopil (Ukraine; at that time Austrian crown land of Galicia). He died on August 26, 1981 in Mexico City and was buried in Houston, Texas.

Dmochowski attended the Ukrainian Grammar School for Boys in Peremyshl, and in 1928-33 he studied at the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Lviv, where he gained a bachelor's degree. In 1934-35 he worked as a general practitioner at the Lviv university clinic. He subsequently obtained a grant from the J. Potocki Foundation for Scientific Investigation of Cancer and Tuberculosis and moved to Warsaw where, from 1935 to 1938, he was a research assistant in the cancer laboratoryy of the Polish State Institute of Hygiene, Department of Bacteriology and experimental Medicine. In 1973 he gained a Doctor of Medicine degree from Warsaw University.

Obtaining a one-year traveling fellowship from the Potocki Foundation, in 1938 he came to the United Kingdom where, unti l1946, he conducted research at the Imperial Cancer Research Fund (now Cancer Research UK). During this period he published five papers in the British Medical Journal, the British Journal of Experimental Pathology, the British Journal of Cancer and the Journal of Pathology and Bacteriology. in 1946 he moved to Leeds, where he worked as a researcher and lecturer in the Department of Experimental Pathology and Cancer Reasearch at the School of Medicine, University of Leeds. He also lectured in microbiology. In 1949 he obtained a second doctorate from Leeds University, and in 1950 was promoted to the position of reader at the university. In this period he published a further 24 papers in The Lancet (1947), Nature (1947, 1948, 1950, 1951) and other journals (Advances in Cancer Research, British Medical journal, Journal of the National Cancer Institute, Acta-Unio Internationalis Contra Cancrum, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences). In 1951, he was invited to give a series of lectures on oncology at a number of universities in the USA. in 1953-54 he was a visiting associate professor of microbiology at the Colombia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York. From 1949 to 1955 he was an adviser to the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration (UNRRA). He was a member of the Royal Society of Medicine, the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, the British Society of General Microbiology, and the Pathological Society oof Great Britain and Ireland.

Deciding to settle in the USA, in 1954 Dmochowski moved from New York to Houston, where in 1954-55 he was a professor of anatomy at the Baylor University of College of Medicine, and a consultant at the M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute (now University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center). He continued to work at M.D. Anderson where he was chief of the Section of Virology and Electron Microscopy (1955-65), acting head of the newly-established Department of Virology (1965-66), and, from 1966, professor and head of the Department of Virology. From 1955 he was also professor ofexperimental pathology at the University of Texas Postgraduate School of Medicine, and, from 1965, professor of virology at the new University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences. Additionally, he was a clinical professor at the Baylor University College of Medicine (from 1955), and a distinguished lecturer at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta (1966). After 1974 he continued with his academic and research work at M.D. Anderson. His main academic interests included virology, experimental oncology, immunology and serology of tumors, endocrinology, and electron microscopy in cancer diagnosis. He was the author or co-author of over 450 articles and papers, as well as chapters in several books. He was at the forefront of research into the role of viruses in oncology, one of the first researchers to report the viral origins of various malignant tumors (1953), and a pioneer in the application of electron microscopy in oncovirology. He also discovered viruses which cause leucosis in rodents and demonstrated the presence of such viruses in human beings.

Dmochowski was a member of the Ukrainian Physicians' Society in Lviv and the Ukrainian Medical Association of North America, and (from 1959) a full member of the Shevchenko Scientific Society in the US. He was also a member of the American Association for Cancer Research, the Electron Microscopy Society of America, the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine, the American Society for Microbiology, the New York Academy of Sciences, the Leukemia Society of America (National Board of Trustees, 1966-; National Medical and Scientific Advisory Board, 1966-1970), and the Pan American Cancer Cytology Society. He was an honorary member of the Chilean Society of Cancerology.

Source: Kovaliv, Yuriy B. (20 June 2014). Leon Dmochowski. Ukrainians in the United Kingdom. Retrieved from http://www.ukrainiansintheuk.info/eng/02/dmochowski-e.htm

Doak, Edmund K.

  • Person
  • 1909-2000

Edmond King Doak, (Jr.?) was born October 3, 1909, in Taylor, Texas, and died 29 November 2000 in Houston. His father was Edmond King Doak, Sr., MD, born August 9, 1878, in Lexington, Texas, and died December 20, 1971 in Taylor, Texas. Doak, Sr., was among the doctors who built a new hospital in Taylor in 1920.
Doak, Jr., graduated from the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1934 and was on the faculty at Baylor College of Medicine. He had an office in the Hermann Professional Building in 1974. Member of the American Diabetes Association; was on the Council 1959-1960.
He has (two?) entries in the Gazetteer of Texas Physicians and his papers are MS 049 at the Texas Medical Center archives. His portrait is N-1003.

Dreizen, Samuel

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n81043291
  • Person
  • 1918-1994

Samuel Dreizen was born September 12, 1918 in New York, New York, and died April 26, 1994, in Houston, and is buried at Beth Yeshurun Cemetery in Houston. He taught at the University of Texas Dental Branch.

Durham, Mylie E. Jr.

  • Person
  • 1919-1991

Mylie Eugene Durham, Jr. was born April 7, 1919, in Houston. His father, Mylie Durham, Sr. (7 March 1893 – 7 March 1962) was also a doctor, originally from Winfield, Louisiana; Durham Elementary School was named for Durham, Sr., in 1968 in honor of his years of service at Heights Hospital. Durham, Jr’s, brother Charles also went into medicine as a obstetrician.
Durham died June 3, 1991, in Houston.

Ehni, George

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n84007816.html
  • Person
  • 1914-1986

George John Ehni, MD was a neurosurgeon who practiced in Houston from 1949-1986. During 1959-1979 he was chairman of the division of neurosurgery at Baylor College of Medicine. Born in 1914 in Pekin, Ill, Dr. Ehni was a 1939 graduate of Northwestern University Medical School in Chicago. He served an internship at Cincinnati (Ohio) General Hospital (July 1939-1940) and a residency at the Mayo Foundation in Rochester, Minn (July 1940-1944). During World War II, Dr. Ehni served in the US Navy. In 1946 he moved to Temple and established the department of neurosurgery at Scott and White Clinic. He moved to Houston in 1949. Dr. Ehni was a past president of the Neurosurgical Society of America, the Southern Neurosurgical Society, and the International Society for Study of the Lumbar Spine. He died September 2, 1986 at the age of 72.

[Source: Obituary, Texas Medicine, January 1987, p.82]

Elliott, Frederick C.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n2004006056
  • Person
  • 1893-1986

Dr. Frederick C. Elliott was born in Pittsburgh, Kansas on October 26, 1893. He worked for a short time as a pharmacist.

In 1918, he received his doctorate in dentistry from Kansas City Dental College. The following year he taught at the same institution as an instructor of Histology and Clinical Dentistry. For the next four years, 1919-1923 he served as Professor of General and Dental Pathology and eventually Superintendent of Clinics at Kansas City-Western Dental College. Dr. Elliott accepted the position of Superintendent of Clinics in 1928 at the University of Tennessee, College of Dentistry. In that same year on April 28 he married Ann Orr.

Houston became Dr. Elliott's home in 1932 when he accepted a Professorship of Dental Prosthesis and Deanship at the Texas Dental College. He was instrumental in getting the Texas Dental College to become part of the University of Texas System. From 1943 to 1952 he served in both academic and administrative posts in the University's School of Dentistry.

Dr. Elliott's vision, dedication and perserverance were instrumental in the growth and development of the Texas Medical Center. He campaigned tirelessly on behalf of the Dental Branch and the Texas Medical Center. Under his leadership as Executive Director and Secretary of the Board of Directors, 1952-1963 over $120 million dollars of capital improvements were planned and completed. Even after his retirement Dr. Elliott continued to lend support and encouragement to the Texas Medical Center.

Dr. Elliott wrote and spoke extensively on the University of Texas System and the Texas Medical Center. In the 1950s and 60s Dr. Elliott, Dr. James P. Hollers and others were active participants in the structuring of the South Texas Medical Center in San Antonio.

In addition to his administrative and teaching responsibilities Dr. Elliott was an active member in many professional associations and organizations, including : American Dental Association, Tennessee State Dental Association, Houston District Dental Society - Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science - Fellow, Texas Academy of Science, Texas State Dental Society, Federation Dentaire Internationale, International Association for Dental Research. He also lent his energies and expertise to government service, civic and business organizations and hospitals.

Dr. Elliott has received numerous awards, honors and citations. The William John Gies Award (1973) from the American College of Dentists, the Gold Medal Award from the Pierre Fauchard Academy (1960), Dentist of the Century in commemoration of the Houston District Dental Society Centennial on May 16, 1959 are just a few of his earned distinctions.

Dr. Elliott was a deeply religious and patriotic individual. His concern for humanity fueled his efforts for excellence in teaching and health care systems. On December 31, 1986 the Texas Medical Center lost one of its most industrious founders

Fernbach, Donald J.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n83157715
  • Person
  • 1925-2013

Donald Joseph Fernbach was born April 10, 1925 in Brooklyn, New York. He served in the European Theater and earned a Bronze Star during World War II. He earned his Bachelor’s from Tusculum College in Greeneville, Tennessee, in 1948 and his MD from George Washington University School of Medicine in 1952, and came to Houston to study pediatrics as one of Baylor College of Medicine’s first residents. He also completed a residency at Children’s Medical Center and Harvard University School of Medicine in Boston, followed by a fellowship in hematology and oncology. He returned to Houston in 1957 to join the faculty at Baylor and helped found the Research Hematology-Oncology Service (now the Children’s Cancer Center) at Texas Children’s Hospital in 1958.
Dr. Fernbach coauthored the first textbook on clinical pediatric oncology, led the effort to screen for sickle cell disease in newborns, and was the first to transplant bone marrow between identical twins to treat aplastic anemia. He was the director of the Blood Transfusion Services at Texas Children’s from 1957 to 1971. He was one of the founders of Houston’s Ronald McDonald House and led the movement to ban smoking in the Texas Medical Center.
Dr. Fernbach died September 22, 2013, in Houston and is buried at the Houston National Cemetery.

Fields, William

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n50023365
  • Person
  • 1913-2004

William Straus Fields was born in Baltimore, Maryland on August 18, 1913. He graduated from Harvard with his A.B. cum laude in 1934 and then with his M.D. from Harvard Medical School in 1938. He was a recipient of the Mary and Matthew E. Bartlett Scholarship there from 1935-1938. following graduation he was an intern in pathology at Nashville General Hospital and the Department of Pathology at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine until 1939. From 1939-1940 he was an intern in medicine at the Children's Memorial Hospital in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. He then served as the assistant resident in medicine at the Royal Victoria Hospital in Montreal from 1940-1941. He served for five and a half months in neurosurgery at the Montreal Neurological Institute before joining the Royal Canadian Navy.

While serving the Royal Canadian Navy, William Fields held ranks from Surgeon-Lieutenant to Surgeon-Commander. He was part of the Naval Research Division doing wartime research at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Banting Institute at the University of Toronto from 1943-1945. From 1945-1946 he served as the Principal Medical Officer for the Naval Officer in Charge at the Port of Montreal. Following his service in the Royal Canadian Navy, he was the Rockefeller Fellow in Neuropsychiatry at Washington University School of Medicine and resident in Neurology at Barnes Hospital in St. Louis, Missouri from 1946 to 1949.

He was appointed to Associate Professor of Neurology at Baylor College of Medicine in 1949 and he served until 1951. In 1951 he was promoted to Professor of Neurology and in 1959, he became Chairman of the Department of Neurology where he served until 1965. we served as a Professor of Neurology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas and then at The University of Texas Medical School in Houston where he ultimately became the Chairman of the Department of Neurology. He also held staff and consulting positions at many Texas and Houston-area hospitals.

During his career he served the Methodist Hospital, Jefferson Davis and Ben Taub Hospitals, Parkland Memorial Hospital and Presbyterian Hospital, St. Luke's Episcopal, and Texas Children's Hospitals and St. Joseph Hospital, St. Anthony Center and Hermann Hospital as a staff member. He also worked as a consultant for Hermann, St. Luke's Texas Children's, M.D. Anderson and Diagnostic Center Hospitals, the Veterans Administration, Wilford Hall AF Hospital, St. Paul Hospital and Baylor University Medical Center, and the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute.

Fred, Herbert L.

  • https://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n88090673.html
  • Person
  • 1929-2018

Herbert Leonard Fred, MD was born June 11, 1929 in Waco, Texas. He was known for his contribution to medical education. He was an award-winning clinician, diagnostician, and professor of internal medicine. Dr. Fred, an emeritus American Osler Society member, centered his medical practice on the patient, championing the use of the mind and five senses to develop medical diagnoses.

In Waco, the Fred family was known for community service, keen athletic team support, and their jewelry store, L. Fred and Son. His father, Isadore (Isie) Fred (1897-1969) received a posthumous City of Waco Commemoration for contributions to the community. Famous for his zest for life and his warm heart, Isie was a friend of many community and national leaders in athletics and film. Dr. Fred’s mother was Helen Louise Marks (1905-1985). He had one sister, Shirley Fred Strauss (1932-2014). Dr. Fred’s paternal grandparents were Louis Fred (died 1940), a Prussian immigrant who became a naturalized citizen of the United States in 1908, and Pauline (Peshi) Fred (1866-1950). Dr. Fred’s maternal grandparents were Samuel Marks (1866-1932) and Fannie Marks (1869-1956). Dr. Fred married Lucille (Lucy) Therese Maule (born 1928) in 1954. They had three children: Stuart Fred (born 1955) and twins Nancy Lynn Fred Sadick and Michael Fred (born 1957). Dr. Fred and Lucy divorced in 1976. Dr. Fred married Judith Ann Edgar Biddington in 1978. She had four children from her first marriage: Lisa Collette Biddington (born 1961), Floyd Wesley Biddington (born 1965), Gregory Leonard Biddington (born 1969), and Stefani Biddington, (birth date unknown).

Dr. Fred spent his boyhood in Waco, Texas, graduating from Waco High School in 1946. He attended then Rice Institute (today Rice University) in Houston, TX, graduating in 1950. He attended medical school at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland from 1950 to 1954. He completed his medical training as an internist with a two year internship and residency at The University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah in 1957. Dr. Fred served as a Captain in the United States Air Force Medical Corps from 1957-1959, acting as Chief of Medicine at the Amarillo Air Force Base Hospital in Amarillo, Texas. He then returned to Salt Lake City first as Chief Resident, Department of Internal Medicine, at the Salt Lake City General Hospital and then as an Instructor in Medicine at the University of Utah College of Medicine from 1959 to 1961. In 1962, Dr. Fred and his young family moved to Houston, Texas where Dr. Fred accepted an appointment as Instructor in Medicine at Baylor University College of Medicine.

Dr. Fred worked at institutions in Houston, Texas for the remainder of his career. After holding a number of academic positions at Baylor from 1962 to 1969, Dr. Fred left Baylor to accept a position as Director of Medical Education at St. Joseph Hospital in 1969 where he continued until 1988. In addition, he accepted positions as Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine at the University Of Texas Graduate School Of Biomedical Sciences in 1968 and as Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, at The University of Texas Health Science Center in 1971, retaining both appointments today. From 1979 to 2002, Dr. Fred served as Adjunct Professor, Human Performance and Health Sciences, at his alma mater, Rice University. From 1988 to 1993, Dr. Fred held a position as the Educational Coordinator at the HCA Center for Health Excellence. Beginning in 1982, Dr. Fred served as a medical expert witness in a number of medical malpractice trials. Records pertaining to these trials from 1988 to 2011 are located in the Legal Series. These folders are restricted due to the use of patient names until 2050. Dr. Fred is a member of thirteen medical societies including the American Medical Joggers Association, American College of Physicians, American College of Chest Physicians, American College of Sports Medicine, American Medical Writers Association, and American Osler Society.

Dr. Fred received numerous awards for teaching excellence from students and peers. Highlights include: Outstanding Full-Time Clinical Faculty Member at Baylor University College of Medicine in 1964 and 1967; a citation from President Ronald Reagan in October 4, 1988 for 27 years as a medical educator; The Benjy F. Brooks, M.D. Outstanding Clinical Faculty Award from the Alumni Association of the University of Texas Medical School in Houston in 1999; honoree of The Herb Fred Medical Society, Inc., a corporation established in 2002 by former students; The American College of Physicians – American Society of Internal Medicine Distinguished Teacher Award along with election to Mastership in The American College of Physicians in 2004; the TIAA-CREF Distinguished Medical Educator Award in 2005; and The American College of Physicians Laureate Award in 2012.

Dr. Fred’s running and medical practices intersected. Some of his scholarly articles include clinical descriptions of long distance running effects on the human body and promote running as preventive medicine. He often combined participation in running events with visiting professorships and Grand Rounds at other medical institutions. Dr. Fred began his competitive running career by running marathons but later switched to ultra-marathons, 100 mile races lasting 24-26 hours. Dr. Fred holds 3 National Age Records. By 2011, Dr. Fred had run a total of 244,950 miles.

Dr. Fred’s writing career arose from his medical practice and running competition. A tenacious advocate of clarity and precision in medical discourse both in his teaching and as an author, Dr. Fred determined to improve the accuracy of medical communication, written and spoken. Dr. Fred wrote over 450 scholarly medical articles. He served as editor-in-chief of the Houston Medical Journal from 1984 to 1988 and Houston Medicine from 1988 to1993. Other editorial responsibilities included positions with Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise from 1979 to 1986, Annals of Sports Medicine from 1982 to 1985, Circulation from 1995 to 2004, Resident and Staff Physician from 2003 to 2008, and Texas Heart Institute Journal from 2011to the present. Dr. Fred served as a peer reviewer for Southern Medical Journal, Chest, Journal of the American Medical Association, and Circulation. He was a correspondent for Ultrarunning magazine from 1981 to 1986. Dr. Fred authored several books in his career, including "Elephant Medicine and More", "Say Aah, Medical Writing: A Practical Guide", "Looking Back (and Forth): Reflections Of An Old-Fashioned Doctor", "Images of Memorable Cases: 50 Years At The Bedside", and "The Best of Herb Fred, MD".

Dr. Fred served on the Board of Trustees for the Houston Congregation for Reform Judaism from 1995 to 2004, acting as President of the Board from 1996 to 1998. Additionally, he joined the Board of Directors for the Friends of the Texas Medical Center Library in 2007, acting as Secretary from January 2011 to the present.

Dr. Fred continued to practice medicine and ran 11 miles a day on his treadmill until 2016. He retired in 2016. Dr. Fred died on December 30, 2018 and is buried in Agudath Jacob Cemetery in Waco.

Friends of the Texas Medical Center Library

  • Corporate body
  • 1960-

The Friends were incorporated in 1960 to “assist in the development, improvement, and expansion of facilities, services, and functions of the Texas Medical Center Library, and to support its administration. It shall be the purpose of the organization to secure gifts and bequests and provide funds for books, journals, rare books and manuscripts, and whenever possible for library equipment, lectureships, and scholarships, and for any other purpose which would be beneficial to the” Library. The collection was donated by James Greenwood III, who is apparently the son of James Greenwood, Jr., MD, who has a small collection in the TMC Library archives.

Gandy, Joe R.

  • Person
  • 1908-1985

Joe Ruel Gandy was born October 12, 1908, in Lipan, Hood County, Texas, and died in Houston on April 16, 1985 and is buried at Forest Park Westheimer Cemetery. Dr. Gandy was a surgeon for the Southern Pacific Railroad Hospital (now the Thomas Street Clinic). His research related to railroad medicine.

Greater Houston Hospital Council

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n85812271
  • Corporate body
  • 1970-1997

“An association of hospitals dedicated to helping member hospitals contain costs and provide high-quality healthcare to the citizens of the area” through efficiency studies, shared purchasing, and lobbying.

Greenberg, Stanley Donald

  • Person
  • 1930-1999

Stanley Donald Greenberg was born July 27, 1930, in Beaumont, Texas, and died May 6, 1999, in Houston; he is buried at Emanu El Memorial Park in Houston.

Greenwood, James, Jr.

  • Person
  • 1907-1993

James Greenwood, Jr., was born in Seguin, Texas July 19, 1907 and died July 3, 1993. He was a 1927 graduate of Rice University and earned his MD in 1931 from the University of Texas, after which he spent a two-year residency at Philadelphia General Hospital. He began practice at Methodist Hospital in September of 1935 and began teaching at Baylor College of Medicine in 1943. Greenwood developed bipolar electrocoagulation, which enabled surgeons to stanch bleeding while irrigation the incision to prevent the tissue from overheating and incurring more damage. During his long career in neurological surgery, he was chairman of neurosurgery at Methodist Hospital, president of Methodists Hospital staff from 1943 to 1953 and 1957 to 1958, and acting chair of surgery at Baylor College of Medicine in 1944. In 1975, he received the distinguished Houston Surgeon Award from the Houston Surgical Society. He was a member of numerous local, state and national medical-related boards and organizations.
I also found and saved a newsletter about the bipolar electrocoagulation development and a biography written by another doctor.

Greer, Alvis

  • Person
  • 1885-1975

Alvis Eugene Greer was born May 6, 1885, in Gallatin, Illinois. He earned his MD from Northwestern University in 1908 and received an Alpha Omega Alpha key at graduation. He spent two years at Harvard Postgraduate Medical School and served in the Army Medical Corps in World War I. Geer specialized in internal medicine and diseases of the chest. Taught at Baylor College of Medicine and was on staff at the Houston Tuberculosis Hospital, Memorial Hospital, and Jefferson Davis Hospital. He was a member of the American College of Chest Physicians, serving on its board of examiners from 1946 to 1952 and president from 1953 to 1954. He died in Houston on August 8, 1975, and is buried at Forest Park Cemetery.

Gregory, Raymond

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n2001080956
  • Person
  • 1901-1988

Dr. Raymond Gregory was born February 20, 1901, in Beeville, Texas. At age 15, he moved to Austin with his family. He received his B.A. and M.A. in organic chemistry in 1922 and 1923, respectively, from the University of Texas. He received his Ph.D in biochemistry from the University of Minnesota, and received his medical degree in 1930. Dr. Gregory completed his internship at Minneapolis General Hospital.

Dr. Gregory taught for a year after receiving his Ph.D, then joined his father-in-law in Hawarden, Iowa, to practice general medicine. From 1937-1939, he was professor and Head of the Department of Medicine at Howard University Medical School in Washington, D.C. From 1939-1940, he was professor and Head of Medicine at the University of Arkansas School of Medicine in Little Rock.

In 1940, Dr. Gregory returned to his home state as an Associate Professor of Medicine at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. He soon became chairman of the Department of Pharmacology. He later held the positions of Ashbel Smith Professor of Internal Medicine and Chairman of the Department of Internal Medicine. After retiring from UT-Galveston in 1968, Dr. Gregory worked at the Diagnostic Clinic of Houston until 1986.

Dr. Gregory died in 1988 (from "Summary of Interview with Doctor Gregory," Box 1 Folder 1; The Alcade May-June 1988).

Gulf Coast Regional Blood Center

  • Corporate body
  • 1975-

The Gulf Coast Regional Blood Center opened January 1, 1975 and, in association with the Blood Center of East Texas and the Blood Center of Brazos Valley, serves 26 counties and over 170 institutions in the Texas Gulf Coast region, including the Texas Medical Center in Houston.

Guynn, Robert

  • Person

Dr. Robert Guynn graduated from Michigan State University and went to medical school to receive his MD from Johns Hopkins University. He completed his internship for general internal medicine at Case-Western Reserve University/Lakeside Hospital in Cleveland, Ohio. He completed his residency in psychiatry at the Henry Phipps Clinic of the Johns Hopkins Hospital. He spent a three-year fellowship in the U.S Public Health Service doing biochemical and metabolic research. He is the current chair of the Scientific Program Committee for the annual meeting of the American Psychiatric Association. [Source: School, McGovern Medical. "Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences." The University of Texas Medical School. N.p., n.d. Web.]

Haas, Felix

  • Person
  • 1917-

Dr. Felix Levere Haas was born on October 26, 1917 in Alvin, Texas, the oldest son of three children. The Alvin native entered the University of Texas at Austin in 1939. His studies were interrupted with the onset of World War II. Haas en listed in the United States Army Air Corps. He received aviation training from January 5, 1942 - September 5, 1942. As a navigator he led numerous combat missions with the 13th Air Force over the South Pacific. He served until February 22, 1946 and was promoted to the rank of Captain.
In June of 1947, Haas received his Bachelor of Arts degree in Genetics and Bacteriology from U.T. He was awarded the Rosalie B. Hite Predoctoral Fellowship and continued to study for his Masters of Arts. Drs. Wilson S. Stone and Orville Wyss were pleased to have Haas as their research fellow. While experimenting he made an important discovery in the genetics of micro-organisms. He found that irradiation of the growth medium resulted in genetic mutations in bacteria when they were grown in it. In short, a biochemical basis must be present to produce mutations.
Felix Haas continued his research earning his M.A. in August of 1948. That same year he met Cathryn E. Swausch, Dr. Wyss' laboratory assistant. They worked closely together for the next two years and were married on January 21, 1950. By June, Dr. Haas received his doctorate in Biochemistry and Biology.
The Haas couple left the University of Texas at Austin for the California Institute of Technology, where Dr. Haas accepted a one year (1950-1951) postdoctoral fellowship in Genetics from the Eli Lilly Company. At the Institute he worked with Drs. George Beadle and Herschell Mitchell. The following year he was awarded a USPHS Postdoctoral Fellowship at the California Institute of Technology. With the outbreak of the Korean War Dr. Haas was recalled to active military duty. As a result he had to decline the fellowship.
Upon his return to Texas, Dr. Wilson Stone arranged for him an indefinite delay in the re-activation orders. He also made it possible for Dr. Haas to work as a research scientist for the Atomic Energy Commission. He conducted his research on the campus of the University of Texas at Austin and the Old Baker Estate in Houston (M.D. Anderson Hospital). Professor Stone and Dr. Haas worked closely until March of 1953.
The Bristol Laboratories Inc. of Syracuse, New York offered him the position of Senior Microbiologist. In his three years (1953-1956) with Bristol Laboratories he directed research on: improving by genetic mutations mold strains (Penicillium) used for the commercial production of penicillin; developing the Actinomycete strains which led to the production of tetracycline by fermentation (this production method and strain are currently responsible for the largest part of the world's supply of tetracycline). Dr. Haas also taught graduate students at the University of Syracuse. As an Associate Professor of Genetics he taught Genetics and Radiation Biology.
Dr. and Mrs. Haas and their three young sons left Syracuse, New York in May of 1956 and returned to Houston. The M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute appointed him head of the Department of Biology (1956-1975). His responsibilities included recruitment of faculty, formulating research and teaching policies, long-range planning and investigating funding sources.
From 1973 to 1975 Dr. Haas also served as Assistant to the Director of Research at M.D. Anderson Hospital.
Dr. Haas resigned as head of the Department of Biology in 1975 to assume the full duties of coordinating the research program of the hospital. He supervised and directed the Office of Research and served as advisor to the director and president on all matters concerning research at M.D. Anderson Hospital. In 1979 he accepted the position of staff assistant to the president.
On approval of the Board of Regents, the request for establishment of the UT GSBS was presented to the Texas Legislature, and was passed in Spring 1963. Governor John Connally signed the bill into law on June 10, 1963. By action of the Board of Regents the authorized school was established on September 28,1963.
Dr. Haas was a key figure in the founding of UT GSBS at Houston. He served as an important member of many special and standing GSBS Committees.
Between UT SCC, M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute and UT GSBS at Houston Dr. Haas was an active member of nearly twenty committees. They include: Education; Curriculum; Committee on Graduate Studies; Dean's Administrative Committee; Faculty Classification Committee. Virtually, every year since 1949, Dr. Haas has been a principal participant in national and international symposia and conferences. He has written forty three articles and nineteen abstracts. Dr. Haas lists memberships in the following professional and scientific societies: American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Society of Microbiology, Genetics Society of America, American Academy of Microbiology, American Institute of Biological Sciences, Radiation Research Society, American Association for Cancer Research, American Genetic Association. He has been honored by Phi Theta Kappa, Sigma Xi, listed in Who's Who in the South and Southwest and American Men of Science.
Dr. Felix L. Haas' leadership, knowledge and skill have touched and enriched the lives of many. His dedication was essential to the success of established and new programs organized by UT SCC, M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute and UT GSBS at Houston. Dr. Haas retired in 1981 to enjoy his love of art, music, and spend time with his wife, Cathryn and their three sons, Michael, Stephen and Larry.

Note: Felix Haas in the Library of Congress does not appear to be this Felix Haas.

Halpert, Bela

  • Person
  • 1896-1984

Bela Halpert was born in Hungary in 1896. He received his medical degree from the German University in Prague. He held positions as pathologist, instructor, professor, and fellow at German University, Johns Hopkins Medical School, University of Chicago, William Harvey Cushing Memorial Hospital, Yale University as well as various institutions in New Orleans and Oklahoma. He came to Houston in 1949 where he served as chief of laboratory services for the Veterans Administration and professor of pathology at Baylor College of Medicine.

Citation: Baker, Marilyn M. The History of Pathology in Texas. Texas Society of Pathologists, 1996. pp. 169-170.

Harrington, Paul R.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n88169070
  • Person
  • 1911-1980

Dr. Paul Harrington (September 27, 1911- November 29, 1980) was an orthopedic surgeon and former chief of surgical services at TIRR. He died Nov. 29, 1980.He was interested in polio and scoliosis. He developed a surgical procedure for the correction of curvature of the spine.

Harris County Academy of General Practice

  • Corporate body
  • 1948-

The Harris County Association of General Practice is a component branch of the American Academy of General Practice and the Texas Chapter of the American Academy of General Practice. Through the diligent efforts of Dr. Lyman C. Blair and others a charter was issued on July 23rd, 1948, thereby establishing the Harris County Chapter.

On September 1st, 1948 the Harris County Association of General Practice held its first meeting in the Medical Arts Building. Twenty three physicians participated in the presentation and acceptance of the chapter's first constitution and by-laws. Officers were elected and monthly meetings were scheduled at this time. Dr. Blair served as the chapter's first president and Dr. M. E. Petway was elected the first Secretary.

Over the years meetings were held in a number of locations to encourage general practitioners to join and gather support. Some of the locations were the Medical Arts Building, the Baylor College of Medicine, the San Jacinto Inn, various restaurants and hotel dining rooms, M.D. Anderson Hospital and the Doctors' Club. Eventually, dinner meetings were established at the Doctors' Club, an annual meeting was held at the M.D. Anderson Hospital and the February meetings were held in Baytown.

Following the lead of its parent organization, the Association lent support to local general practitioners, encouraged young physicians to enter the field, and sponsored a number of postgraduate and scientific programs conducted by various nationally recognized specialists. The Harris County Association of General Practice took great pride in its efforts to improve the image of general practice and the fine postgraduate programs it conducted.

The Harris County Medical Archive is proud to house this vital collection. The collection successfully documents the history of a local medical association and to some extent the attitudes with the field of general practice.

The collection is open for research. Those interested in using the collection whould contact the Archivist or Special Collections Librarian.

Committees of the Harris County Academy of General Practice Credentials Hospital Liaision Public and Profession Relations Education and Program Membership By-Laws Publications Special Resolutions and Memorial Grievance Ethics and Jurisprudence Entertainment Student Orientation Budget Roster Historical

Harris County Health Department

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n50029268
  • Corporate body

Harris County Public Health is the county health department responsible for providing community health services and programs, including disease-management measures as diverse as health testing and screening, mosquito control, environmental testing, nutritional support, animal control and zoonoses, and natural disaster response. Note: The Harris County Archives CR059 is a collection of Harris County Public Health records 1942-2004.

Harris County Hospital District

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2008077807
  • Corporate body
  • 1965-

The Harris County Hospital District was created by voter referendum in November 1965 and formalized with taxing authority in January 1966. Its creation followed the publication of Jan de Hartog’s The Hospital, an expose of the conditions at Jefferson Davis Charity Hospital (opened 1924). The District replaced a contentious city-county system in which both were responsible for support of the hospital. Quentin Mease was a founder and chairman of the District.
Lyndon B. Johnson General Hospital opened in 1989. In 1990, emergency facilities at Lyndon B. Johnson and Ben Taub (1963) Hospitals were expanded and Harris County residents began to be assigned to each by ZIP code to better manage caseloads. HCHD was renamed Harris Health System in 2012.

Harris County Psychiatric Center

  • Corporate body
  • 1986-

The Harris County Psychiatric Center opened in 1986 and became the psychiatric wing of the UT Health Science Center at Houston in 1990; it serves as the teaching hospital for the McGovern Medical School. Except for the outpatient ECT clinic, it provides inpatient care only and runs specialized programs to address a long list of concerns. Outpatients are referred to the NeuroPsychiatric Center at Ben Taub Hospital or to a Mental Health and Mental Retardation Association clinic. It serves the community both directly and through the Harris County jail and juvenile detention systems, school districts, and many other educational, legal, and health and development-focused institutions.

Hartgraves, Ruth

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2004021115
  • Person
  • 1991-1995

Ruth Hartgraves, MD, a Houston obstetrician and gynecologist who delivered more than 3,000 Houstonians and pioneered the trail for women in medicine during the span of her 50 year career, died October 17, 1995, at the age of 93. A native Texan, Dr. Hartgraves was born October 24, 1901 and moved to the Houston area during the 1930s to attend the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) in Galveston. She graduated from UTMB's School of Medicine in 1932, and thereafter completed an internship at the New England Hospital for Women and Children in Boston, and a residency at the New York Infirmary for Women and Children.

Dr. Hartgraves begain her career in Houston in 1935 and held appointments at Methodist, Hermann, Memorial, St. Luke's and Jefferson Davis Hospitals before retiring from practice in 1987. She was also a faculty member of Baylor College of Medicine for almost 30 years.

Dr. Hartgraves was the recipient of the 1992 Distinguished Professional Women's Award which is presented by the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. This award was presented in recognition of Dr. Hartgraves' outstanding achievements in Texas and the nation, for the significant contributions she made to her professional discipline, and for her pioneering spirit to mentor women and to provide a positive role model.

In 1985, she was awarded the Distinguished Alumnus Award from the University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Hartgraves was also the recipient of the 1980 Ashbel Smith Distinguished Alumnus Award granted by the UTMB School of Medicine alumni to graduates who have made significant contributions to the medical profession and to mankind.

She served as an organizer and the first President of the Houston branch of the American Medical Women's Association (AMWA), as well as President of the national AMWA organization. In 1975, her efforts earned her the AMWA's highest honor, the Elizabeth Blackwell Award, presented annually to a person making an outstanding contribution to the cause of women in medicine. Dr. Hartgraves was the first Texas physician to be so recognized.

She was a charter member of St. Luke's United Methodist Church and had a life-long record of involvement in community affairs, including the Houston Grand Opera, the Houston Ballet Society, and the Blue Bird Circle Clinic for Pediatric Neurology.

Houston Chronicle, Thursday, October 19, 1995.

Hayes, Teresa

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n2014189446
  • Person
  • 1953-

Teresa Gray Hayes, MD, Ph.D. is an oncologist and an associate professor in hematology and oncology at Baylor College of Medicine. She earned both a Ph.D. and an MD from New York University School of Medicine, in 1981 and 1982, respectively

Hench, Philip Showalter

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n2006184682
  • Person
  • 1896-1965

Dr. Philip Showalter Hench was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania February 28, 1896. He died on vacation in Jamaica, March 30, 1965.

He graduated from Lafayette College, Easton, Pennsylvania, at the age of 20 and entered the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. He completed his medical studies in 1920 and in 1921 became a fellow at the Mayo Graduate School of Medicine of the University of Minnesota. He was appointed faculty member at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, in 1925. In 1926 he was appointed head of the new section on rheumatic diseases. In 1928 he studied in Frieburg, Germany under the pathologist Professor Aschoff and in Munich under Professor von Muller. In 1953 he became a senior consultant of the Mayo Clinic. He retired from the Mayo Clinic and Mayo Graduate School of Medicine in 1957.

In the 1930s he was instrumental in strengthening the diagnosis standards of rheumatic diseases. He wrote several important papers on various aspects of rheumatology which gained his the respect of his profession. He encouraged others to join him in compliling the Annual Rheumatism Reviews, for which he served as the chief editor from 1932 to 1948. Dr. Hench was a founder of and active in the Arthritis and Rheumatism Association during his whole career and served as its president in 1939. Dr. Hench was chairman of the Ligue Internationale contre le Rheumatisme and of the Arthritis and Rheumatism Study Section of the National Institutes of Health. In 1962 he was appointed a member of the Commission on Drug Safety for advancement of the predictability of the action of new pharmaceuticals in humans.

During World War II he served in the United States Army Medical Corps at Hot Springs, Arkansas and at Camp Carson, Colorado when he directed the United States Army Rheumatism Center. He was promoted to rank of colonel in 1945.

When he returned to the Mayo Clinic after the war, he began to mention in his speeches the possible existence of an anti-rheumatic substance based on observations that some conditions, such as pregancy, jaundice or fever, seemed to afford patients remission of the pain and other symptoms of rheumatic diseases. During the 1940s, Dr. Edward C. Kendall, Hench's colleague at Mayo Clinic, succeeded in extracting a compound from the adrenal cortex. With some of the Clinic patients' willingness, in 1948, Hench and his research colleagues decided to try the compound on the patients to determine its effect on their rheumatoid arthritis.

The dramatic results of freedom from pain, lessened swelling and increased movement obtained by the patients were instantaneous news. In 1949 Dr. Hench reported to the American College of Physicians and to the seventh meeting of the International League against Rheumatism the results of the trials of cortisone and Adrenocorticotropic Hormone (ACTH)in cases of rheumatoid arthritis and rheumatic fever. Although the results were hailed by the general public as a complete cure for rheumatoid arthritis, Dr. Hench insisted that the Mayo team had at that time conducted only preliminary trials. However this was a major breakthrough in the treatment and research of rheumatic diseases.

In 1950, Dr. Hench was awarded the Nobel Prize for physiology and medicine jointly with biochemists Dr. Edward C. Kendall and Professor Tadeus Reichstein of Basle. He won many other awards for his research work, including the Lasker Award of the American Public Health Association, the Heberden Award from the Heberden Society in Great Britain, the Criss Award from the American Rheumatology Association,an award from the Argentine Society of Rheumatology, an honorary degree of Doctor of Science from the National University of Ireland, and the Modern Medicine Award.

Dr. Hench was a member or honorary member of many national and international institutions and organizations. Among the many were the American Academy of Arts and Sciences; the RoyalSociety of Medicine, London; the Royal Academy of Medicine of Belgium; the Association of American Physicians; Association of Military Surgeons of the United States.

Dr. Hench married Mary Genevieve Kahler in 1927. They had four children: Mary Showalter Henty, Dr. Philip Kahler Hench, Susan Kahler Bowis, John Bixler Hench. Mrs. Hench's father had worked with the Mayo Clinic to provide the use of the Kahler Corporations group of hospitals, hotels and supporting institutions for Mayo staff and patients. Dr. Hench served on the Board of Directors of the Kahler Corporation.

His hobbies were tennis, music, photography and the works of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. He published several articles on medicial history, most notably on the conquest of yellow fever.

Biographical information from: "Philip Showalter Hench, M.D." by James Eckman. The Journal-Lancet, Vol. 85, No.5, May 1965, p. 218-220; "Obituary Notices: P. S. Hench, M.D.", British Medical Journal, April 10, 1965, p. 1003; "Dr. Philip Hench, Nobel Laureate, Dies" Mayovox, Vol. 16, No. 12, April 9, 1965, p.1.

Hermann Hospital (Houston, Tex.)

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n92089041
  • Corporate body
  • 1925-1999

Hermann Hospital was a public hospital endowed by George Hermann (1843-1914) with a fortune accumulated through investments in oil and real estate. The hospital opened south of downtown Houston in the summer of 1925. It merged with Memorial Hospital in 1999 to create Memorial Hermann Health System. The original Spanish-style building is now part of Children's Memorial Hermann in the northwest corner of the Medical Center.

Hickey, Robert

  • Person
  • 1915-2006

Dr. Robert Cornelius Hickey was born December 9, 1915 in Hallstead, Pennsylvania. He received a bachelor’s degree from Cornell University in 1938 and his MD, also from Cornell University, in 1942. After graduating, he went to University of Iowa, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, and the National Cancer Institute for advanced training in both radiology and surgery. He worked in University of Iowa College of Medicine, M.D Anderson, University of Wisconsin Medical School, and the American Association of Endocrine Surgeons. He developed several techniques for treating patients with various endocrine tumors.

Dr. Hickey died May 17, 2006, in Madison, Wisconsin.

Hild, Jack R.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no91023037
  • Person
  • 1904-1992

Jack Romulus Hild was born February 27, 1904 in Waco, Texas. He earned his Bachelor’s degree from the University of South California at Los Angeles, and his MD from Tulane University in New Orleans, in 1929, after which he served an internship in pediatrics in Cincinnati, Ohio. He and his wife Dorothy moved to Douglas, Arizona, in 1933 and stayed there until 1939, when he completed his residency. During World War II, Hild achieved the rank of major in the Army Air Force Medical Corps. Two of his three children were injured by polio in the late 1940s and Hild and Dr. O.A. Fly were co-directors of the mass polio vaccinations in Harris County in 1962. He died on August 24, 1992, and is buried at Glenwood Cemetery in Houston.

Hoff, Hebbel

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n85809755
  • Person
  • 1907-1987

Hebbel Edward Hoff was born December 2, 1907, in Urbana, Illinois. His family moved to Washington state when he was a child and he was the valedictorian of the 1924 class of Bothell High School, Bothell, Washington. He studied medicine at the Universisty of Washington for four years before being awarded a Rhodes Scholarship to study at Oxford University in England. He completed his M.D. at Harvard University in 1936 and continued to do research in electrocardiology at Yale University. He won the Warren Scientific Treatise Prize in 1941 while working at Yale. He was chair of the McGill University (Toronto, Ontario, Canada) Physiology Department from 1943 to 1948, when he took a position with Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. He was dean of Baylor until his death on May 1, 1987.

Houston Academy of Medicine

  • Corporate body
  • 1915-

The Houston Academy of Medicine was created in 1915 by the Harris County Medical Society to facilitate physicians’ access to up-to-date medical and scientific information.

Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center Library

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n81015967
  • Corporate body
  • 1915-

The origins of the library date back to 1915, when the Houston Academy of Medicine (HAM) established a small library in downtown Houston to serve the Harris County Medical Society. This Library was combined with the Baylor College of Medicine’s (BCM’s) small library in 1949 to form a centralized collection. As more institutions joined the Texas Medical Center, they also shared the resources of the TMC Library, thereby creating a unique point of collaboration among the institutions of the TMC.

A permanent home for this new library was built in the early 1950’s, through the efforts of HAM and BCM. Jesse H. Jones contributed funding for the construction, and in 1954, the approximately 27,000 square foot, three-story “Jesse H. Jones Library Building” was dedicated. By 1975, a new addition to the building had added another 76,000 square feet for the Library’s growing collection. At this time, the Library officially became known as the Houston Academy of Medicine – Texas Medical Center Library. Today the library uses the shorter operating name of The TMC Library.

The McGovern Historical Center (MHC) is the rare book and archive department for the library. The earliest acquisition records for the books in the MHC are found in the Houston Academy of Medicine’s (HAM) Library Committee reports for 1935 and 1936. Thirty Fellows of the Academy raised $300 to purchase a collection of 275 French medical books published between 1730 and 1830. In 1949, HAM and Baylor College of Medicine combined their medical libraries. In anticipation of the completion of the Jesse H. Jones Building for the library, the MD Anderson Foundation purchased the rheumatology collection of a New York physician, Dr. Reginald Burbank. This purchase was followed by a gift from the Cora and Webb Mading Foundation of more than 1,000 titles on sanitation and communicable diseases. After the 1954 dedication of the library building, many physicians donated books or historical pamphlets to be stored in a very small, locked room on the second floor. Soon after his arrival in Houston, Dr. McGovern became one of the Library’s most staunch supporters, annually supplying funds for the purchase of rare books and travel support for the librarians to attend meetings of the American Association for the History of Medicine. In 1977, The Library formed a new department with new quarters to collect historical materials and to enhance the rare book collections. In 1982, Dr. McGovern donated his personal collection of rare and historical book to the Library. In 1996 the Library’s Board of Directors named the historical department in his honor.

Houston Alliance for the Mentally Ill/NAMI Houston

  • Corporate body
  • 1988-

Education and advocacy group Harris County Alliance for the Mentally Ill was established in 1988 and operated later as NAMI Metropolitan Houston. It acquired full National Alliance on Mental Illness affiliate status in 2005. It is split into subchapters within the region. NAMI Metropolitan Houston and NAMI West Houston merged on January 1, 2013, to form NAMI Greater Houston.

Houston Area Parkinson Society

  • Corporate body
  • 1974-

Founded in 1974, HAPS is a nonprofit dedicated to improving the quality of life of Parkinson’s patients through education, advocacy, and services. The Society was mostly run by volunteer until 1994, when it was able to hire its first full-time executive director. It now offers free therapeutic and support groups, care subsidies, transportation, and emergency financial assistance, and serves eight counties around the Houston metropolitan area.

Houston District Dental Society

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n88095511
  • Corporate body
  • 1904

The Greater Houston Dental Society, formerly the Houston District Dental Society, was founded in 1904 and serves as the Houston-area chapter of the Texas Dental Association and the American Dental Association. It seeks to provide public and professional health education.

Houston-Galveston Area Council

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n80006171
  • Corporate body
  • 1966-

Founded in 1966 and funded by the US Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, the H-GAC is the regional planning and oversight organization through which local governments consider issues and cooperate in solving area-wide problems. H-GAC serves thirteen counties in the Houston-Galveston area. The greater HGAC includes departments of community and environmental planning (conservation, historic map collection), data services (geographic, information technology, web development, regional 911); finance and budget; human services (independent living for seniors; job placement; and aid for low-income persons); public services; and transportation.
The Health Systems Agency specifically seeks to promote the development of health systems in the region by determining need, developing an implementation plan, reviewing data, and reviewing applications for assistance. Among their missions “is to facilitate the procurement of goods and services in an open, fair, transparent, and economically competitive environment”.

Huang, Charles T. L.

  • Person
  • 1938-2011

Possibly born 1938 October 12 in Tsienkiang, Fukien, China, as Tzu Lee Huang; added Charles upon naturalization in 1975. Arrived in US in 1969. Died December 25, 2011.

Huggins, Russell A.

  • Person
  • 1910-2001

Russell Arno Huggins was born 1910 June 25 in Cleveland, Ohio. Huggins graduated from Aurora College in Illinois and earned his Ph.D. in biology from the Case School of Applied Science, now Case Western Reserve University, in the later 1930s. He taught at the University of South Dakota Medical School from 1943 to 1945 and the University of Georgia College of Medicine in Augusta from 1945 to 1947. He joined the Baylor College of Medicine faculty in the department of pharmacology in 1947, then moved to physiology in 1960 and pediatrics in 1980. He contributed to the development of the departments of physiology at the University of San Juan, Puerto Rico, and Mahidol University in Bangkok, Thailand. Dr. Huggins was noted for his work in cardiovascular physiology and pharmacology, which contributed to the development of techniques for heart catheterization. He was a founding staff member of the USDA-Baylor Children’s Nutritional Research Center.
Dr. Huggins was married to Professor Sara Elizabeth Huggins, the University of Houston’s first female chair of the biology department. He died August 1, 2001, in Ithaca, New York, and is buried in Memorial Oaks Cemetery in Houston.

Results 1 to 100 of 232