Houston (Tex.)

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Houston (Tex.)

232 典拠レコード results for Houston (Tex.)

232 results directly related Exclude narrower terms

MacKie and Kamrath

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2009044810
  • 組織体
  • 1937-

Menninger Foundation

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n87117731
  • 組織体
  • 1925-

Charles Fredrick (C. F.) Menninger, MD (also known as Dr. C. F. and CFM), began the Menninger Clinic in 1925. Although not initially a trained psychiatrist, he had an interest in psychiatry and is considered a pioneer in the then-emerging field. Two of his sons specialized in psychiatry at medical school and joined him in operating the clinic. Karl Augustus Menninger, who recently had graduated from medical school, joined him in the clinic late that same year. His son William Claire Menninger, Karl's younger brother, joined the clinic in 1927. Dr. Karl and Dr. Will, as the brothers were known, became leaders in the field. Dr. Karl managed the medical side of the clinic, while Dr. Will managed the finances and administration as the CEO. When Dr. Will died unexpectedly in 1966, Dr. Karl briefly took over as CEO before Dr. Will's son Roy Menninger, MD, known as Dr. Roy, was elected CEO. When Dr. Roy retired in 1993, his younger brother, William Walter (Walt) Menninger, known as Dr. Walt, succeeded him. John McKelvey succeeded Dr. Walt in 2001, and Dr. Walt was named chairman of The Menninger Foundation board of trustees. Menninger moved to Houston in 2003 after it formed an affiliation with The Methodist Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine.

Texas Hadassah Medical Research Foundation

  • 組織体
  • 1991-

The Texas Hadassah Medical Research Foundation was part of Baylor College of Medicine during the late-1990s and early 2000s. The organization, led in part by Dr. Armin Weinberg, provided medical supplies, cross-cultural collaboration and professional exchanges with Israel, Palestine, Kazakhstan, Russia, and other nations. An important part of its work dealt with radiation effects and events, like Chernobyl and atomic test sites in Kazakhstan. The organization developed the Cancer Registry of survivors of radiation events.

Live Oak Friends Meeting

  • 組織体
  • 1954-

Live Oak Friends Meeting was founded in 1954 and met in congregants’ homes and in several temporary locations before settling in first to an adapted house on Alexander Street. In 2000 they moved into a building on W. 26th Street in the Heights, designed for them, that includes an installation by light artist James Turrell.
Jan and Marjorie De Hartog were longtime residents of Houston and members of Live Oak Friends Meeting, and personal friends of the donors. The original video was recorded by Warren, Ph.D., and Marsha Holleman, M.D., also members of Live Oak and faculty at Baylor College of Medicine.
Jefferson Davis Hospital opened originally in 1924; a second building was constructed in 1939 (razed 1999). By the 1950s, disputes between the city and county over who was responsible for its costs had left it underfunded, understaffed, and plagued by appalling conditions. The De Hartogs’ expose The Hospital prompted the formation of the Harris County Hospital District (Harris Health), the reform of public hospital conditions in Houston, and the development of Ben Taub Hospital in 1963.

City of Houston Department of Public Health and Planning

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n50029268
  • 組織体

Houston Health Department Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Research for Effectiveness (OPERE) (2006), “comprises epidemiologists, statisticians, and GIS analysts who collaborate with . . . partners within and outside the department for research, analysis, interpretation, and sharing of information on health issues that affect our communities”. The Houston Health Department operates several community health centers and provides information on assistance with various health needs, including PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) for those at elevated risk of contracting HIV, or PEP (post-exposure prophylaxis) for those who may recently have been exposed).

Harris County Health Department

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n50029268
  • 組織体

Harris County Public Health is the county health department responsible for providing community health services and programs, including disease-management measures as diverse as health testing and screening, mosquito control, environmental testing, nutritional support, animal control and zoonoses, and natural disaster response. Note: The Harris County Archives CR059 is a collection of Harris County Public Health records 1942-2004.

Greater Houston Hospital Council

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n85812271
  • 組織体
  • 1970-1997

“An association of hospitals dedicated to helping member hospitals contain costs and provide high-quality healthcare to the citizens of the area” through efficiency studies, shared purchasing, and lobbying.

Texas Heart Institute

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n82127251
  • 組織体
  • 1962-

Dr. Denton A. Cooley, the founder of the Texas Heart Institute, attended the University of Texas and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, where he graduated in 1944. After serving in the Army Medical Corps and studying with Lord Russell Brock in London, he returned to his hometown of Houston, Texas to teach surgery at Baylor College of Medicine in the 1950s. The Texas Heart Institute was founded on August 3, 1962 in order to research and treat cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death in the United States. Among many innovations developed by Cooley and his colleagues at the Institute are the first implantation of an artificial heart, the first successful heart transplant in the United States, advances in treatment of congenital defects, and a number of prostheses and implants. The Institute is part of Texas Medical Center, the largest medical center in the word. CHI St. Luke’s Health – Baylor St. Luke’s Medical Center is the Institute’s clinical partner. [Sources: Texas Heart Institute website; The Houston Review, vol. 2, no. 1, p.16-19]

Visiting Nurse Association of Houston, Inc.

  • 組織体
  • 1908-

Now VNA Health, the Visiting Nurse’s Association is a nonprofit founded in 1908 that provides in-home care for a wide variety of patient needs, including in-home nursing and assisted living, hospice care, various forms of therapy, and lending medical equipment.

Texas Medical Center Nursing Education Consortium

  • 組織体
  • 1991 -

The TMC Nursing Education Consortium was organized in 1991 for the purpose of sharing ideas about staff education. It eventually developed three classes, on perinatal care, critical care, and instruction, and offered them to TMC member institutions. It met at the Doctor’s Club until that closed around 2002, and then at another building on Fannin (the reply said “Fannin and Main” but they don’t intersect) for a few more years before fading out.

John P. McGovern Museum of Health and Medical Sciences

  • 組織体
  • 1996-

The Health Museum started out as a series of health exhibits proposed in the wake of the 1962 “Victory Over Polio” mass-immunization campaign. The exhibits opened in 1969 within the Museum of Natural Science. The Museum of Health and Medical Science reopened in 1996 in its own building and was renamed the John P. McGovern Museum of Health and Medical Science in 2001 following a bequest from the McGovern Foundation. The Museum has expanded several times and now features a 4D theater (2008) and the DeBakey Cell Lab, the first bilingual science laboratory museum in the US. In 2017 it became the first Smithsonian affiliate in the Houston Museum District.

University of Texas School of Nursing PARTNERS

  • 組織体
  • 1994-

Providing Advancement Resources To Nursing Education Researchers was formed in 1994 to encourage and support the students and faculty of the Cizik School of Nursing through scholarships, research grants, and endowed professorships, and has also raised funds to build and equip research facilities.

Schull, William Jackson

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n85802836
  • 個人
  • 1922-2017

William J. Schull, PhD was an American scientist and geneticist famous for his research into the effects of ionizing radiation on the human body largely based on the atomic bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki after World War II. Dr. Schull began his scientific career in radiation research in 1949 when he joined the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC), established in Japan in 1946 by the United States National Academy of Sciences, National Research Council to study the effects of the bombings in accordance with a presidential directive from Harry S. Truman. From his first post as Head of the Department of Genetics at ABCC, Dr. Schull served many decades in the elite corps of scientists conducting research into the genetic impact of irradiation on human health. A professor emeritus of The Human Genetics Center, School of Public Health, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Texas, Dr. Schull served on most of the major governmental and non-governmental committees formed throughout the 20th century to quantify the effects of ionizing radiation. He helped form the genetics department at the University of Michigan where he served as a professor from 1956 to 1972. As his career progressed, Dr. Schull frequently served in executive positions, chairing many of the governmental committees he served on and becoming a director, 1986-1987 and 1990-1991, and in 1996-1997, vice chairman and chief of research of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF), established in 1975 as the follow-on organization to the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission. Dr. Schull was inducted into the United States National Academy of Sciences in 2001. In affirmation of his long and honorable service to the Japanese people, Dr. Schull received the Order of the Sacred Treasure, Third Class from the Emperor of Japan in 1992.

William Jackson Schull was born on March 17, 1922 to Gertrude Edna (maiden name Davenport) (1900-1938) and Eugene Shull (1896-1975) in Louisiana, Missouri. While Shull is the last name inscribed on his birth certificate, his name was changed to Schull while he was in elementary school. Dr. Schull spent most of his boyhood in Milwaukee, Wisconsin and graduated from that city’s Lincoln High School in 1939. In 1946, Dr. Schull earned a Bachelor of Science in Zoology from Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. In 1947, he earned a Master of Science in Zoology from the same university. He received a Doctor Of Philosophy in Genetics From Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio in 1949. Enlisting in December 1942, Dr. Schull served in the United States Army as a surgical technician with the 37th Infantry Division in the South Pacific until December 1945. In concert with his scientific work, Dr. Schull valued the preservation of the archival historic record and promoted the preservation of the history of the ABCC and RERF throughout his career. He died June 20, 2017, in Houston.

A detailed curriculum vitae is available for Dr. Schull in the control folder for his collection at the McGovern Historical Collection.

Bertner, Ernst William

  • 個人
  • 1889-1950

Dr. Ernst William Bertner was born at Colorado City, Texas, August 18, 1889. After graduating from the local high school and the New Mexico Military Institute at Roswell, New Mexico, he entered the Medical Branch of the University of Texas, Galveston, receiving his MD in 1911.

Following his graduation, he took intern and residency training at the Willard Parker Hospital, Saint Vincent's Hospital and the Manhattan Maternity Hospital, all in New York City. He came to Houston in July, 1913, where he engaged in practice until World War I, when he enlisted in the Medical Corps.

He was assigned to the British Army, and went overseas in July, 1917. In March, 1918, he was transferred to the American Expeditionary Force, and assigned to Headquarters Medical and Surgical Consultants at Newfchateau, France.

Dr. Bertner had a varied and exciting career in France and served actively on most of the front lines. He was wounded by shrapnel and confined to a hospital for a short period of time. He was soon returned to duty. At one time he was caught in one of the famous German pincers movements and was one of the few surviving Medical Officers.

He was discharged from the Army in June, 1919, at Camp Dix, New Jersey with the rank of Major. The following month he resumed his practice in Houston. In May 1921, he went to Baltimore, Maryland, for post-graduate work at Johns Hopkins Hospital, in surgery, gynecology, and urology. He resumed practice in Houston in May 1922, and since that time limited his work to surgery and gynecology.

He was married at St. Louis, November 30, 1922, to Miss Julia Williams, daughter of the late W.E. Williams formerly General Manager of the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railroad in Texas.

Dr. Bertner was always an active member of organized medicine, in the county, state and national organizations and served as seventy-second president of Texas State Medical Association. He served as President of the Harris County Medical Society, President of the Post Graduate Medical Assembly of South Texas, President of the Texas Surgical Society, and President of the Texas Association of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

He was a member of the Executive Committee of the Central Association of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. He was State Counsellor and a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons. He was a member of the American Medical Association, American Urological Association, American Gynecological Association, Central Association of Gynecologists, and Interurban Gynecological Society.

Dr. Bertner was active in hospital organization, having formerly been Chief of Staff of Jefferson Davis Hospital in Houston, and very active in building the first unit of that institution. Later, he became identified with Hermann Hospital and did much towards the development of the institution, where he served as Chief of Staff. He was also on the Surgical Staff of Memorial Hospital and Southern Pacific Hospital in Houston.

He served as Vice-Chairman of the Houston Board of Health and Executive Committeeman of the Texas Social Hygiene Association. He was a member of the First Presbyterian Church in Houston, a 32nd degree Mason, Knight Templar, Shriner and Knight Commander of the Court of Honor of the Scottish Rite, and a member of the Houston Club, Ramada Club, and Houston Country Club.

Dr. Bertner was one of the founders of the Texas Medical Center and was its first president from 1945-1950. He was named by the University of Texas as acting director of the M.D. Anderson Hospital for Cancer Research when that institution was conceived. He was responsible for the professional organization and the operation of the hospital for the first four years of its existence. He served as professor and chairman of the department of gynecology for the Baylor College of Medicine since its establishment in Houston from 1943 until his death in 1950.

During World War II he was in command of the Emergency Medical Service of the Office of Civilian Defense, and received a Presidential Citation for this service.

Dr. Bertner was a past Vice-President of the American Cancer Society and served on its Board for several years. He was chairman of the Executive Committee of the Texas Division and received the American Cancer Society award for distinguished service in cancer control in 1949. He was a member of the Board of Directors of the Houston Chamber of Commerce. He was a member of the Citizen's Committee for Reorganization of the Executive Branch of the Government, an outgrowth of the Hoover Commission Report.

Dr. Bertner died July 28, 1950 in Houston following a two year battle with cancer. He was survived by his wife, Julia Williams Bertner, two sisters and a niece.

Karnaky, Karl John

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2003070674
  • 個人
  • 1907-1988

Karl Karnaky was born November 7, 1907, in Barham, Louisiana and died May 29, 1988, in Houston, Texas. His parents were from Germany and Austria-Hungary. Karnaky graduated in pre-medicine from Rice University (then the Rice Institute) in 1930 and went on to study medicine at UTMB. He registered for the draft in 1940; he was working out of the Medical Arts Building at the time. In 1940, he treated a five-year-old Houston girl for tumor-induced precocious puberty; the case was compared to that of Lina Medina, a Peruvian girl who gave birth at age five. He taught at Baylor College of Medicine in the late 1940s. He was the director of Menstrual Disorder Clinic at Jefferson Davis and was on staff at Hermann, Park View, Heights, St. Joseph’s, Memorial, and Methodist Hospitals. In the 1960s and 1970s he worked at the Obstetrical and Gynecological Research Institute [and Foundation], Houston.

Smythe, Cheves M.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n89664729
  • 個人
  • 1924-2020

Cheves McCord Smythe was born in Charleston, South Carolina in 1924. He was born into a well-established South Carolina family. Smythe received his undergraduate degree from Yale College in 1943, and his medical degree in 1947 from Harvard Medical School. He completed his internship and residency at the Boston City Hospital. Next, he served as a Research Fellow at the Presbyterian Hospital in New York. Following this, he returned to the Boston City Hospital as a Chief Resident. From 1942-1966, Smythe served in the U.S. Naval Reserve. He was a part of the Medical Corps and became a Lieutenant Commander. He retired from the Naval Reserve in 1966. Beginning in 1955, Smythe started as an Instructor in Medicine at the Medical College of South Carolina. He eventually becoming an Assistant Professor of Medicine and finally Dean. He remained as Dean from 1963 until his departure in 1966. The following four years he served as Assistant Director and Director of the Department of Academic Affairs at the Association of American Medical Colleges. The bulk of his career was spent at The University of Texas Medical School at Houston, where he became the first dean of the school in 1970. He would remain as dean until 1975. Smythe continued his profession at the university until 1995, serving as Professor, Adjunct Professor, and Dean Pro Tem. Smythe continued his career abroad when he became the Dean at the Aga Khan University in Karachi, Pakistan. He served in this role from 1982 to 1985. His involvement with the school continued, and he returned as Professor and Chairman of the Department of Medicine from 1990 to 1991. Smythe had many hospital appointments including the Hermann Hospital, Memorial Southwest Hospital, and the LBJ Hospital. He was also a member of many medical organizations and received many honors and awards. In addition, he was the author of numerous publications. For a complete list of accomplishments please visit Smythe’s vitae and bibliography.

Dr. Smythe died May 11, 2020, in Charleston, South Carolina.

Kahn, Eugen

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/nr98011627
  • 個人
  • 1887-1973

Dr. Eugen Kahn was born in Stuttgart, Germany, on May 20, 1887. He was educated at Heidelberg, Berlin, and then at Munich, receiving his MD in 1911. He spent the next 18 years in Munich as an assistant and associate on the staff of the Psychiatric Clinic, in close association with Dr. Emil Kraepelin.

In 1930 Dr. Kahn went to Yale University, where he served not only as Sterling Professor of Psychiatry and Mental Hygiene but as Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry until 1946. He also served as Psychiatrist-in-Chief of the New Haven Hospital.

Dr. Kahn then moved to Switzerland, where he remained until 1951. In that year he returned to America, coming to Baylor College of Medicine in Houston Texas to serve on the full-time staff of the Department of Psychiatry as a Professor until 1962; for one of those years he served as Acting Chairman of the Department. After 1962 he was Professor Emeritus at Baylor. During his 22 years in Houston, Dr. Kahn was a research associate in psychiatry at the Houston State Psychiatric Institute (Texas Research Institute of Mental Sciences/ University of Texas Mental Sciences Institute) and a consultant in psychiatry at the Veterans Administration Hospital.

Dr. Kahn's entire career was spent in teaching, research, and scholarly activities. He read and wrote on a broad range of topics. He published at least 120 papers, hundreds of book reviews, and four books, the best know of which is Psychopathic Personalities. The last book, The Past Is Not Past, was published in 1962.

Adapted from American Journal of Psychiatry 130:7, 822, July 1973.

Bickel, Laura C.

  • 個人
  • 1912-1977

Laural Carnell Bickel was born in Shamokin, Pennsylvania, on June 2, 1912. She was educated at University of Wisconsin Medical School, (now the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health) and moved to Houston in the early 1940s. She was a pediatrician and did considerable work in both rubella and in congenital diseases. Dr. Bickel died in Houston on December 15, 1977.

Kit, Saul

  • 個人
  • 1920-2008

Dr. Saul Kit (November 25, 1920 - January 24, 2008) was a leader in biochemistry in the Texas Medical Center. He was chief of the section of nucleoprotein metabolism in the Department of Biochemistry at M.D. Anderson Hospital, and later Head of the Division of Biochemical Virology at Baylor College of Medicine. He served as President of the Southwest Section of the American Association for Cancer Researchers, the Treasurer of the American Society for Cell Biology, and President of the American Society for Cell Biology. Dr. Kit was a recipient of numerous research grants from National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, The American Cancer Society, Leukemia Society, Robert A. Welch Foundation, and the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis. For over 25 years he received a Research Career Award from the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. In 1987, he was honored with the Distinguished Inventor of the Year Award for developing the world's first genetically engineered vaccine to be licensed by the U.S. government. Dr. Kit was granted numerous United States and International patents for his pioneering vaccine inventions.

Barkley, Howard T.

  • 個人
  • 1901-1981

Howard T. Barkley, Sr. was born in Tucson, AZ on November 30, 1901. He graduated from the University of Arizona in 1931 with his Bachelor's degree and the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons with a MD in 1935. He first served as an intern at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York before going to the Presbyterian Hospital, also of New York, to serve as a surgical resident. He received further training at the University of Michigan Hospital in Ann Arbor before moving permanetnly to Houston, TX in 1941.

During World War II he served as a flight surgeon for the United States Army Air Corps, reaching the rank of lieutenant colonel. He was an associate of professor of clinical surgery at Baylor College of Medicine from 1943-1980 and chief of thoracic surgery at MD Anderson Hospital from 1944-1968. Barkley also served on the staff of Hermann Hospital in Houston from 1942 to 1972, and as chief of thoracic surgery there from 1944-1968. In 1948 he was appointed chairman of the medical staff at Houston AntiTubercular Clinic. Barkley served in a variety of capacities for different regional medical organizations. Barkley served as president of the Houston Surgical Society in 1952, the Texas Tuberculosis Association from 1956-1958, the Harris County Medical Society in 1967, and the Houston chapter of the American Tuberculosis Association. He served as vice president of the National Tuberculosis Association in 1963-1964. He was a founding member of the American Association of Thoracic Surgery in 1948 and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons in 1964.

Howard T. Barkley died on January 26, 1981.

Knobil, Ernst

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n85312918
  • 個人
  • 1926-2000

Dr. Knobil was a leader and pioneer in many areas of endocrinology, including growth and reproduction. Kr. Knobil's classic contributions include the species-specific effects of Growth Hormone (GH), a model for positive and negative estrogen feedback control of the menstrual cycle, and elucidation of the hypothalamic Gonadotrpin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) pulse generator. His discovery that pulsatile GnRH stimulates Luteinizing Hormone (LH) secretion, altered the field of reproductive endocrinology. This observation also unmasked a pivotal role for pulsatile secretion as a mechanism of hormonal control. Dr. Knobil died April 13, 2000.

The son of an Austrian parents, Dr. Knobil was born in Berlin, Germany on September 20, 1926. The Knobil family moved to Paris in the early 1930's. When the Germans invaded Paris in 1940, the family emigrated to New York City where he attended high school.

At the age of 15, he entered the New York State College of Agriculture at Cornell in 1942. He chose Animal Science as his major due to interests developed from time spent on farms in France during the summers, and from attending the Kinderhook Farm Camp after moving to the United States.

Upon graduating from Cornell in 1948 (including a 2 year interruption of service in the US Army), he entered graduate school in zoology where he worked in the laboratory of Professor Sanuel L. Leonard. After completing his PhD, Dr. Knobil accepted a post-doctoral position with Roy O. Greep at the Harvard School of Dental Medicine from 1951 to 1953. While a fellow, he assumed Greep's teaching duties in endocrinology and rapidly gained recognition as a gifted and scholarly teacher.

In 1953 he was appointed Instructor in the Physiology Department of the Harvard Medical School. In 1957, he was promoted to Assistant Professor after having been selected by Harvard Medical School for the prestigious Markle Scholar in Academic Medicine for the years 1956-1961.

From 1961-1981 he was the Richard Beatty Mellon Professor of Physiology, Chairman of the Department of Physiology and the Director of the Center for Research in Primate Reproduction at the University of Pittsburgh Medical School

Dr. Knobil accepted the Deanship of the University of Texas Medical School at Houston in 1981. From 1981 on he was the H. Wayne Hightower Professor in the Medical Sciences and Director of the Laboratory of the Laboratory for Neuroendocrinology at the University of Texas-Houston Health Science Center - Medical School. The Laboratory closed in 1997. More than 80 fellows and students studied in his laboratories in Boston, Pittsburgh and Houston. In 1989 he was named an Ashbel Smith Professor, the University of Texas Health Science Center.

Among the many awards, Dr. Knobil received were the highest ones awarded by the Society for the Study of Reproduction (Carl G. Hartman Award, 1983), The Endocrine Society (Fred Conrad Koch Award, 1982), and the American Physiological Society (Walter B. Cannon Memorial Lecture, 1997). He was elected to numerous positions of leadership including the Presidencies of The Endocrine Society (1976), the American Physiological Society (1979), and the International Society of Endocrinology (1984-1988). He was a member of many U.S. and foreign scientific societies' review boards, NIH study sections, and the editorial broads of numerous scientific journals.

Dr. Knobil was a member of the U.S. National Academy of Science (1986), the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a foreign associate of the French Academy of Science, the Italian National Academy of Science, and the Belgian Royal Academy of Medicine. He received several honorary degrees among them ones from the University of Bordeaux (1980), the Medical College of Wisconsin (1983), the University of Liege (1994), and the University of Milan (2000).

In addition to being the author of 217 scientific papears, he was the editor of several reference books in endocrinology and reproduction, including The Handbook of Physiology (1974), The Physiology of Reproduction (1988, 1994), and The Encyclopedia of Reproduction (1998).

Dr. Knobil died April 13, 2000 in Houston Texas. He was survived by his wife of 40 years, Dr. Julane Hotchkiss Knobil, three sons, one daughter and four grandchildren.

Adapted from the Endocrine Reviews 22(6): 721-723, 2001.

Cooley, Denton A.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n79078765.html
  • 個人
  • 1920-2016

Dr. Denton A. Cooley, the founder of the Texas Heart Institute, attended the University of Texas and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, where he graduated in 1944. After serving in the Army Medical Corps and studying with Lord Russell Brock in London, he returned to his hometown of Houston, Texas to teach surgery at Baylor College of Medicine in the 1950s. The Texas Heart Institute was founded on August 3, 1962 in order to research and treat cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death in the United States. Among many innovations developed by Cooley and his colleagues at the Institute are the first implantation of an artificial heart, the first successful heart transplant in the United States, advances in treatment of congenital defects, and a number of prostheses and implants. The Institute is part of Texas Medical Center, the largest medical center in the word. CHI St. Luke’s Health – Baylor St. Luke’s Medical Center is the Institute’s clinical partner. [Sources: Texas Heart Institute website; The Houston Review, vol. 2, no. 1, p.16-19]

Doak, Edmund K.

  • 個人
  • 1909-2000

Edmond King Doak, (Jr.?) was born October 3, 1909, in Taylor, Texas, and died 29 November 2000 in Houston. His father was Edmond King Doak, Sr., MD, born August 9, 1878, in Lexington, Texas, and died December 20, 1971 in Taylor, Texas. Doak, Sr., was among the doctors who built a new hospital in Taylor in 1920.
Doak, Jr., graduated from the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1934 and was on the faculty at Baylor College of Medicine. He had an office in the Hermann Professional Building in 1974. Member of the American Diabetes Association; was on the Council 1959-1960.
He has (two?) entries in the Gazetteer of Texas Physicians and his papers are MS 049 at the Texas Medical Center archives. His portrait is N-1003.

Kelsey, Mavis P.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n80061247
  • 個人
  • 1912-2013

Dr. Mavis Parrott Kelsey, founder and senior partner of the Kelsey-Seybold Clinic, P.A., was born in Deport, Texas on October 7, 1912. In 1932 he received his Bachelor of Science degree from Texas A&M College. Inspired by his grandfather, country doctor Dr. Joseph Benson Kelsey, he attended the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, earning his MD in 1936. Dr. Kelsey served a rotating internship at New York City's Bellevue Hospital before returning to UTMB for a year as an Instructor in Pathology. From 1938 to 1939 he served on the Junior staff of Scott and White Clinic in Temple, Texas. On September 17, 1939, Dr. Mavis P. Kelsey married Mary Randolph Wilson. In that same year he accepted a three-year fellowship in internal medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, where he befriended Dr. William Dempesey Seybold, whom he had first met at UTMB. Dr. Kelsey's stint at the Mayo Clinic was interrupted by his service in the U.S. Army Air Force, Medical Corps from 1941-1945. His assignments a included Certified Flight Surgeon's rating; Surgeon of the 11th Fighter Command in Alaska, 1942-1943; Editor-in-Chief of the Air Surgeon's Bulletin. Dr. Kelsey attained the rank of Lieutenant Colonel and was awarded the Legion of Merit in 1945. For awhile during the war, the Kelseys were stationed in Dayton, Ohio, where Dr. Kelsey worked at the Aero Medical Research Laboratory, Wright Field Air Force Base.

After the War, Dr. Kelsey completed his training at the Mayo Clinic receiving a Masters of Science in Internal Medicine from the University of Minnesota, Mayo Foundation, in 1947. He was appointed to the Mayo Clinic staff as an Instructor in Medicine. After some deliberation, the Kelseys returned to Houston on January 15, 1949. Dr. Kelsey leased office space in the new Hermann Professional building with the intent to practice internal medicine with an emphasis on endocrinology. Unfortunately, construction was running behind and the office was not ready, so Dr. E.W. Bertner and Dr. George Waldron each offered free office space. Dr. Kelsey divided his time between the two offices until May. In 1950 Dr. Kelsey encouraged Drs. Leary and Seybold to reconsider the prospect of establishing a clinic in Houston, and idea they had discussed while working together at the Mayo Clinic, Leary in chest diseases and Seybold in surgery. Seybold moved to Houston in October of 1950 and Leary in January of 1951 and the three physicians founded the Kelsey-Leary-Seybold Clinic. The Clinic first resided on the fourteenth and eighth floors of the Hermann Professional Building.

In addition to his clinic practice, Dr. Kelsey held many teaching and administrative posts. Among them were: Instructor of Medicine, Mayo Foundation in the University of Minnesota; Acting Dean, the University of Texas Postgraduate School of Medicine; Clinical Professor of Medicine, University of Texas School of Biomedical Sciences; Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine. Dr. Kelsey also served on the staff of St. Luke's Hospital (Consulting Staff and Vice Chief of Staff), Methodist Hospital and M.D. Anderson Hospital for Cancer Research. Dr. Kelsey also acted as Medical Advisor for many corporations including the Pennzoil Corporation, Roy M. Huffington, Inc. and United Energy Resources. Over the years Dr. Kelsey has been an active member in many professional associations and organizations. They include: Alpha Omega Alpha, Alpha Kappa Kappa, Sigma Xi, he was elected to the Philosophical Society of Texas, Fellowship in the American College of Physicians, Aerospace Medical Association, American Thyroid Association, Harris County Medical Association, Texas Medical Association, The Endocrine Society, American Medical Association, Mayo Alumni Association, American and Texas Diabetes & Endocrine Association, American Cancer Society (Board of Directors, Harris County Unit), Yearbook of Cancer (Editorial Consultant), Kelsey-Seybold Foundation member of the Board of Trustees and Grants Committee, Member of the President's Council for Texas A&M Medical College and the Sterling C. Evans Library, First City National BankMedical Center (Board of Directors), Development Board of University of Texas Medical School-Galveston. Dr. Kelsey's participation in civic and social organizations reflect his interest in the fine arts, history and genealogy and nature. He has devoted time and resources to the Houston Country Club, A&M Association of Former Students, Friends of the A&M University Library, University of Texas Health Science Center-Presidents Club, Allegro, UT Alumni Association, Texas Nurseryman's Association, Texas Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, ASIA Society, Friends of Bayou Bend, American Book Collector's Society, Beaumont Art Museum, Harris County Heritage Society, Southwestern Cattleman's Association, and the Houston Committee on Foreign Relations, a charter member of the American Historical Print Society. Dr. Kelsey is a Distinguished Alumnus of Texas A & M and an Ashbel Smith Distinguished Alumnus of the U.T. Medical School in Galveston.

Dr. Kelsey and his wife, Mary had a great love for American art and Americana. They donated their collections to several museums and university libraries. The Mavis and Mary Kelsey Collection of Winslow Homer Prints is housed in the Museum of Fine Arts Houston. Dr. Kelsey wrote the catalog for this Collection, named "Wilson Homer Graphics", which is an authoritative reference work used by Homer scholars nationwide. The United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland received their collection of Naval Prints. The Kelsey Collection of Thomas Nast Illustrations was donated to Pepperdine University. The University of Houston was given a collection of wood engravings on Social Life and War. The Kelseys’ collection of the letters of John Quincy Adams was given to Bryan Mawr College. Dr. and Mrs. Kelsey gave to the Sterling C.-Evans Library of Texas A&M University their Collection of Americana. Several thousand books, art works and prints make up this outstanding collection. He and his wife traveled extensively and studied their respective family histories. They wrote six books of genealogy.

Dr. Kelsey was an active farmer and rancher for many years and participated in a number of other business activities including oil exploration and apartment building. After his retirement he Mary devoted their time in writing genealogy; cataloging and writing about their extensive collection of historical and art prints, painting and rare books, investing and philanthropy. In 1985, Dr. Kelsey retired from the Kelsey-Seybold Clinic after thirty-seven years. He died November 12, 2103.

Copeland, Donna R.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n82147433
  • 個人

(Born circa 1950) Dr. Copeland attended the University of Houston from 1968 to 1972 before graduating cum laude from Rice University in psychology in 1975. She completed a Master’s in 1978 and a Ph.D. in 1979, both from the University of Houston. From 1979 to 2003 she was chief of the Behavioral Medicine Section of the Department of Pediatrics at UT MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Dreizen, Samuel

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n81043291
  • 個人
  • 1918-1994

Samuel Dreizen was born September 12, 1918 in New York, New York, and died April 26, 1994, in Houston, and is buried at Beth Yeshurun Cemetery in Houston. He taught at the University of Texas Dental Branch.

Yoffe, Boris

  • 個人
  • 1949-

Boris M. Yoffe was born August 24, 1949. He earned an MD in 1974 from the Institute of Technology in Haifa, Israel. He has taught gastroenterology at Baylor since 1983.

Andrews, Tom A.

  • 個人
  • 1903-1977

Urologist Tom Adam Andrews. Jr., was born November 26, 1903 in West Point (near La Grange), Fayette County, Texas to Tom A., Sr., and Augusta “Gussie” Rabb Andrews.. He married Helen sometime before 1930 and served in the Navy Medical Corps during World War II. He died on October 16, 1977, in Houston and is buried at Forest Park Cemetery. Note: He is listed in various places online as “Jr.” but at least one source gives his father’s middle name as Adolphus, not Adam. His older son was also Thomas Adam (1930-1991).

Bloom, Samuel

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n2001004825
  • 個人
  • 1921-2006

Rodgers, L. Rodney

  • 個人
  • 1920-2012

Lawrence Rodney Rogers, MD, was born March 9, 1920 in Clovis, New Mexico, to a cowboy and a schoolteacher, and died December 13, 2012, in Houston. He grew up in Amarillo, Texas. He was elected to the Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor Society during his junior year at the University of Texas Medical Branch. He volunteered for the US Army during World War II and served as a battalion surgeon in the 42nd Rainbow Division in the European Theater, including the Battle of the Bulge, for which he earned three Bronze Stars and four Battle Stars. Accounts of his treatment of prisoners at Dachau and Jewish patients in occupied Austria are on video at the Houston Holocaust Museum.
Dr. Rodgers specialized in internal medicine at Philadelphia General Hospital for three years before returning to Texas to practice in Houston from 1949 to 1994. He was chair of the Department of Internal Medicine at Hermann Hospital in 1965 and was active in the effort to establish the University of Texas Medical School at Hermann in 1966-1967 and served the school both as a professor and member of many committees.
Dr. Rodgers served the Harris County Medical Society as TMA delegate, on the executive board, and for a year as vice president, and was for a time editor of the Harris County Physician. He served as President of the Houston Society of Internal Medicine in 1974, of the Houston Academy of Medicine in 1981, of the Doctors’ Club in 1986, and the Houston Philosophical Society in 1994, and supported and participated in many more organizations. He was awarded the Ashbel Smith Distinguished Alumni Award by UTMB, and the American College of Physicians awarded him both a Laureate Internist Award for Texas and Mastership of the College.

Schnur, Sidney

  • 個人
  • 1910-1997

Sidney A. Schnur (June 23, 1910 – April 8, 1997) was born in Manhattan, New York and earned his MD from New York University in 1935. He was a physician and a clinical assistant professor at Baylor College of Medicine. One of Schnur’s patients at St. Joseph’s Hospital, near death from cardiogenic shock (when the heart cannot pump enough blood to meet the body’s needs) after a heart attack, was the test for Denton Cooley’s heart-lung machine in April 1956; the patient lived another six weeks before succumbing to a second heart attack.
Schnur served as president of the Harris County Medical Society in 1972.

Kelsey, John

  • 個人
  • 1922-2010

John Roger Kelsey was born in May 1922 in Deport, Texas. He graduated from Baylor College of Medicine and later became a fellow in internal medicine and gastroenterology at Mayo Clinic. While in Minnesota, he earned his Master of Science degree from the University of Minnesota. He served as clinical professor of medicine at Baylor College of Medicine and as chief of the gastroenterology department at Methodist Hospital. Dr. Kelsey, along with Dr. William Seybold and Dr. William Kelsey developed Houston’s Kelsey-Seybold Clinics.
Citation: CHRONICLE, CINDY HORSWELL HOUSTON. "John Kelsey, Founder of Clinic Bearing His Name, Dies." Houston Chronicle. N.p., 24 July 2010. Web.

Chapman, Don

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n99254652
  • 個人
  • 1916-2007

Donald Wilton Chapman was born in Bridgewater, Iowa, on May 21, 1916 and earned both his BA and MD from the University of Iowa. He served as a major in the US Army Medical Corps in the European Theater during World War II. Chapman moved to Houston in 1944 to become one of the ten original faculty members of Baylor College of Medicine. He taught and practiced for fifty years, was a member of numerous professional organizations, and taught as a visiting professor in medical schools around the United States and the world. The Harris County Medical Society awarded him the John P. McGovern Compleat Physician Award in 1976. Dr. Chapman died on May 3, 2007 in Houston.

Copeland, Murray M.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2018054171
  • 個人
  • 1902-1982

Murray Marcus Copeland was born June 23, 1902, in Georgia, and died April 2, 1982, in Easton, Texas, although he lived in Houston at the time. Copeland was a professor of surgery at UT MD Anderson Cancer Center from 1960 to 1982. He had been chair of Georgetown University’s medical school from 1947 to 1960 and was president of the American Cancer Society from 1964 to 1965. Dr. Copeland graduated from Oglethorpe University in 1923 and earned his MD from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1927. He also trained in surgery at the Mayo Clinic Memorial Hospital for Cancer in New York City. He served in medical corps in the Pacific Theater during World War II and was awarded a Legion of Merit. Copeland has an entry in the Handbook of Texas Online.

Autrey, A. M., Jr.

  • 個人
  • 1899-1983

Adam Manuel Autrey, Jr., was born October 31, 1899 and died June 17, 1983; he is buried in Forest Park Cemetery in Houston.

Barrett, Bernard M.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n83312861
  • 個人
  • 1944-

Bernard M. Barrett, Jr., is a plastic surgeon. He was born May 3, 1944 and graduated from the University of Miami in 1969. He is currently in practice in Houston. His father Bernard M. Barrett, Sr., (February 4, 1917 – September 19, 2001) was an otolaryngologist in Florida.

Autrey, A.M., Sr.

  • 個人
  • 1863-1935

Dr. A.M. Autrey, Sr., was an eye, ear, nose, and throat specialist. He was born October 4, 1863, in Veracruz, Mexico. He died December 28, 1935, in Houston and is buried at Forest Park Cemetery.

Pugh, Martha

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2020062162
  • 個人
  • 1939-

Knowles, W. Roy

  • 個人
  • 1929-2005

William Roy Knowles was born in Gilmer, Texas, on December 13, 1929 and died in Houston on September 3, 2005. He is buried at Memorial Oaks Cemetery. He trained as a dermatologist at Baylor College of Medicine starting in 1965. The announcement of the establishment of his office in Houston in 1968 notes that he was one of two dermatologists in Texas at the time capable of performing “chemosurgery” to remove skin cancers. He seems to have had an ongoing interest in Civil War medicine; local papers note that he sometimes gave talks on the subject. His brother Royce was also in medical practice in Palestine.

De Hartog, Jan

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n78095785
  • 個人
  • 2014-2002

Jan de Hartog was born April 22, 1914 in Haarlem, Netherlands. He ran away as a young teenager and took jobs on fishing boats, as a coal shoveler, and as a tour boat captain. He wrote in his spare time, published a series of mystery novels, and started a career in theater in the late 1930s.
In May 1940, ten days before Germany invaded, de Hartog published Holland’s Glory, a novel about ocean-going tugboat captains. The book was not political but because of the title and thoroughly-Dutch subject it became a bestseller and drew the attention of the Gestapo. De Hartog had already joined the Dutch resistance movement and had to flee to England, where he continued resistance work alongside like-minded British. He eventually became a pacifist and joined the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers). His years in England introduced his work to English-language audiences and he produced several successful books and plays.
De Hartog moved to the United States in the late 1950s and married his third wife, Marjorie Hein. In the early 1960s, the de Hartogs and others became aware of the poor conditions at Jefferson Davis Hospital and the ongoing dispute over whether the city or county was responsible for its funding. The expose The Hospital spurred the formation of the Harris County Hospital District (now Harris Health System).
De Hartog died September 22, 2002, in Houston. He and Marjorie were long-time members of Houston’ Live Oak Friends Meeting. This VHS was donated by the Drexler family, who were also members of LOFM; their daughter Alethea was an assistant at the John P. McGovern Historical Collections at the Texas Medical Center Library.

Barkley, James E.

  • 個人
  • 1925-2014

James Earl Barkley, Jr., was born January 21, 1925, in Uhrichsville, Ohio. He served in Europe and Asia during World War II and was assigned for awhile to the pharmacy at Camp Cooke in Los Angeles, California. He obtained a pharmacy degree from Ohio State University in 1951 and began working for Burroughs Wellcome. He was transferred to Houston in 1961. Barkley spent five years in Washington, DC, between 1962 and 1967, but then returned to Houston. He died on March 20, 2014 and is buried at Forest Park Westheimer Cemetery.
Henry Solomon Wellcome was born August 21, 1853, in a log cabin near what would later become Almond, Wisconsin. He and Silas Mainville Burroughs formed Burroughs, Wellcome, & Co. in 1880. In 1884, they introduced to England the idea of selling medications in tablet form instead of the usual powders or liquids. They also pioneered direct marketing to doctors. Burroughs died in 1895 but the company did well under Wellcome’s direction. Wellcome became a British subject in 1910. Wellcome’s enterprises had been consolidated into the Wellcome Foundation, Ltd., in 1924 and, upon his death on July 25, 1936, this formed the foundation for the Wellcome Trust, which remains one of the world’s largest private biomedical charities.

Kraft, Irvin A.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n85387373
  • 個人
  • 1921-2010

Irvin Alan Kraft was born in Huntington, West Virginia, on November 20, 1921. He attended from Johns Hopkins University but interrupted his education to join the army. He qualified for the Army Specialized Training Program and volunteered to become a doctor, which meant completing two years of pre-medical courses in nine months. His unit studied at NYU School of Medicine and he completed his residency in psychiatry at Kingsbridge VA Hospital in New York City. After a second tour of duty in the Air Force, he received a fellowship in child psychiatry at Tulane University in 1954. He moved to Houston in 1957 to initiate a child psychiatry program at Baylor College of Medicine. He later joined the UT School of Public Health as a clinical professor of mental health.
Kraft was instrumental in founding the Texas Institute of Child Psychiatry in 1963. He worked with Denton Cooley in 1968 as a psychiatric consultant to the heart transplant team. He died May 30, 2010, and is buried at Emanu El Memorial Park.

Sobocinski, Robert

  • 個人
  • 1928-2009

Robert Stanley Sobocinski was born April 6, 1928 in North Tonawanda, New York. He earned his MD from the University of Buffalo Medical School and served as medical officer in the US Navy between 1952 and 1955, aboard the USS Siboney. He was a family physician in Houston for many years. He died August 4, 2009, and is buried at Forest Park East in Webster

Vallbona, Carlos

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n81102713
  • 個人
  • 1927-2015

Carlos Vallbona-Calbo’ was born in Granollers, Barcelona, Spain, on July 29, 1927. His father was abducted by a revolutionary security patrol in 1937 and never returned. Vallbona earned a medical degree in Barcelona in 1950 and did post-graduate work in Paris. He and his wife arrived in the US in the 1953, during the polio epidemic.
Vallbona began his career in the US at the University of Louisville School of Medicine in Kentucky but moved to Houston in 1955 to work for Baylor College of Medicine and for the Southwestern Poliomyelitis Respiratory Center, now The Institute for Rehabilitation and Research (TIRR). He stayed at Baylor for over 50 years. He did extensive work on post-polio syndrome and the use of magnets to relieve pain. He also worked with the Harris County Hospital District (Harris Health) to assist underserved communities. Dr. Vallbona died August 5, 2015, in Houston.

Moore, John T.

  • 個人
  • 1864-1951

John T. Moore, MD, was the first man in the United States “to use radium as part of an operation in the treatment of cancer, he was one of the pioneers in clinical research,” according to an obituary that appeared in the Houston Post, section 1, page 6 on March 20, 1951. Dr. Moore was born in Moore’s Grove. He attended Sam Houston Normal Institute. He was educator before studying medicine. He was superintendent of schools in Trinity, Texas and then Orange, Texas. Dr. Moore received his master’s degree from Texas Christian University and his medical degree from the University of Texas School of Medicine at Galveston. He did graduate work at Johns Hopkins University and the University of Vienna. He was a former president of the Harris County Medical Society. He was a member of the Texas Surgical Society and other medical organizations. Dr. Moore was one of the organizers of the Texas State Medical Society.

Dr. Moore was born September 4, 1864 and died March 1, 1951.

Mooney, Curtis C.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2010004092
  • 個人
  • 1947-0000

Schultz, Stanley G.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n79086970
  • 個人
  • 1931-2014

Stanley Schultz was born in New York City in 1931. He earned his undergraduate degree from Columbia University in 1952 and then his MD from New York University College of Medicine. His postgraduate studies at Belleville Hospital and Harvard Medical School were interrupted by a stint in the Air Force medical corps. When his Harvard studies were completed, he spent nine years at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine before joining UT Health in 1979. He was known for is work on ion movement across membranes and his significant contributions to oral rehydration therapy. He died October 23, 2014.

Houston Academy of Medicine

  • 組織体
  • 1915-

The Houston Academy of Medicine was created in 1915 by the Harris County Medical Society to facilitate physicians’ access to up-to-date medical and scientific information.

University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n50080777
  • 組織体
  • 1970-

in 1962 there was a request, led by TMC co-founder R. Lee Clark, MD, to establish a graduate school of biomedical sciences in Houston. The UT Graduate School of BIomedical Sciences was approved by Texas House Bill 500 on October 14, 1963, with approval for Master’s of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in “biology, including, but not restricted to, areas of emphasis in radiobiology, biomathematics, generics, cytology, fine structure-electron microscope-analysis, molecular biology, with biochemistry and biophysics, microbiology, and virology. Biochemistry including, but not restricted to, areas of emphasis in molecular biology and chemical physiology. Physics including, but not restricted to, areas of emphasis in biophysics, nuclear medicine, and isotope studies. . . . with the stipulation that all areas of emphasis to be added in the future shall come within the three categories listed above (I.e. biology, biochemistry, and physics) and that the areas of emphasis be restricted to biomedical sciences that are adapted to the research facilities of the M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute.”
The University of Texas Medical School was established in 1970, also under the administration of the University of Texas, and its basic science faculty were assimilated into the Graduate School, where before they had worked through MD Anderson Cancer Hospital or occasionally the Schools of Dentistry and Public Health. In 1972, all of these schools were collected into the UT Health Science Center. As of 2001, graduate degrees in biomedical science that would formerly have been awarded through the UT Health Science Center or UT MD Anderson Cancer Center would be awarded through the GSBS. The name was updated in 2017 to The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center UTHealth Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences to reflect the longstanding partnership between the two institutions.

University of Texas Speech and Hearing Institute

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n87117925
  • 組織体
  • 1951-1992

The University of Texas Speech and Hearing Institute was founded in 1951 as the Houston Speech and Hearing Clinic. It joined the UT system in 1971 and for a year was the Division of Communicative Disorders of the University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston. In October 1972 it was renamed the University of Texas Speech and Hearing Institute at Houston and became part of the UT Health Science Center at Houston. Struggling with reduced state funding, fewer resources for faculty and research, and diminished demand for educational programs, its services were taken over by the United Way of the Texas Gulf Coast and the Institute closed on October 31, 1992.

Institute of Religion (Houston, Tex.)

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n77013883
  • 組織体
  • 1955-

The Institute of Religion, now known as the Institute of Spirituality and Health, was founded in 1955 by members of the Houston medical and religious communities. The Institute established the first medical ethics center and one of the first hospital chaplaincy programs in the United States. The Institute conducts lectures on subjects related to medical ethics, healthcare, spirituality and well-being.

Bangs, Tina E.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n80109545
  • 個人
  • 1913-1999

Tina Engdahl Bangs was born December 31, 1915 in Spokane, Washington and died in Houston on September 21, 1999. John Leslie “Jack” Bangs was born September 3, 1913 in Minot, North Dakota and died May 2, 1971. Jack served in the Navy during World War II; they are both buried in the Houston National Cemetery. They were recruited to Houston in 1951 to open a speech and hearing clinic in space donated by Methodist Hospital. The new building for the Houston Speech and Hearing Center Clinical Services opened in 1959 and was tripled in size in 1969 by the addition of a research building.

Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2006019371
  • 組織体

The Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education (SACME) was established April 2, 1976 as the Society of Medical College Directors of Continuing Medical Education (SMCDCME). On July 20, 1998, SMCDCME was re-named to its current title. Note: This Chronology was taken from the SACME website, History page www.sacme.org.

1976 Society established on April 2.

1981 First issue of Mobius published (Lucy Ann Geiselman, editor); Research Committee formed (Harold Paul, chair).

1984 Support of the Research and Development Resource Base in CME (Continuing Medical Education) by the Society (Dave Davis); RICME (Research in Continuing Medical Education) I (David Gullion, Lucy Ann Geiselman, chairs); Training of Society interviewers for "the change study."

1985 Change study interviews total 200.

1986-1988 Search for Society logo.

1986 RICME II (Dave Davis, chair).

1987 First issue of INTERCOM published in January (Harold Paul, Dene Murray, editors); Joint plenary session CME/SMCDCME; highlights of the change study.

1988 RICME III (John Parboosingh, Jocelyn Lockyer, chairs); First Congress on CME (Phil R. Manning, Chair); First honorary member of the Society (Cyril Houle); Title change from Mobius to JCEHP (The Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions) with v. 8 (1); Development of first membership brochure (Harold Paul, Dene Murray and others).

1989 Change study published (Robert Fox, Paul Mazmanian, R.Wayne Putnam, editors); Changing and Learning in the Lives of Physicians; Strategic plan for the Society (George Smith); Membership in the Council of Academic Societies (James Leist, Dale Dauphinee).

1990 First meeting of the "Armadillo Society" (past presidents); RICME IV (Nancy Bennett, chair).

1991 Tri-Group leadership formalized by Alliance for Continuing Medical Education (ACME), Association for Hospital Medical Education (AHME) and SMCDCME; Foundation for research established (James Leist); First Distinguished Service Award (Malcolm Watts).

1992 JCEHP reorganized (James Leist); Third Congress on CME (George Smith, chair); SMCDCME incorporated (George Smith and Robert Kristofco); New JCEHP editor appointed (William Felch); Society home established at AAMC (Brownell Anderson); Position paper presented: The Role of Continuing Medical Education in Academic Health Centers (William Easterling).

1993 Distinguished Service Award (Phil Manning); Research Award (Dave Davis); CME Glossary (Joe D'Angelo); Society listserv established (Robert Bollinger); First Society brochure competition (Susan Duncan); New member orientation established at Spring Meeting (Deborah Holmes).

1994 Distinguished Service Award (Julian S. Reinschmidt); Research Award (Robert Fox); Research Endowment Council established (Brian O'Toole); Task force white paper, The connection between continuing medical education and health care reform (George Smith, Gloria Allington).

1995 Request from AAMC for statement on CME; Reorganization of AAMC's Group on Educational Affairs (GEA), continuing education one of four sections; Pew-Glaxo Working Group on the Future of Academic CME Research Award established (Jocelyn Lockyer, recipient); Distinguished Service Award (Martin Shickman); Report of Society working group on Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) essentials and standards, Future directions for medical college continuing medical education (Arnie Bigbee, chair); Request from ACCME for SACME accreditation surveyors.

1996 Four Society task forces and focus groups address the task force report; Society invited to participate in restructuring of the ACCME.

1997 SMCDCME listserv established by Bob Bollinger.

1998 July 20, SMCDCME re-named the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education (SACME).

1999 SACME Web site created by Bob Bollinger.

St. Joseph Hospital (Houston, Tex.)

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n85276261
  • 組織体
  • 1887-

St. Joseph’s Infirmary was established in 1887 by the Sisters of Charity of the Incarnate Word and was originally housed in a frame building at the corner of Caroline and Franklin Streets. A year later, the hospital entered into an agreement with the Harris County Commissioners’ Court to care for Houston’s indigent patients. It became noted for the care it provided during the 1891 smallpox outbreak. A brick building designed by Nicholas J. Clayton was constructed in 1894 but burned soon after, killing two Sisters, when a fire started in a nearby warehouse. Donations by city residents funded a second new building at Crawford and Pierce; the site is now occupied by the Plastic Surgery Institute. A three-story brick building was completed in 1905 and by 1919, when the Bishop Byrne Annex opened (is this the one on the bus route?) the hospital had 350 beds and a wide range of medical and surgical capabilities. Like many hospitals at the time, it had its own nursing school. The maternity hospital was constructed in 1938 with donations from the George Strake family and still stands at (check address). A new hospital wing and convent building were added in 1940. The emergency department treated over 50 victims of 1947 Texas City Disaster. It was the largest hospital complex in the city until the establishment of the Texas Medical Center at the end of the 1940s. Before Texas Children’s Hospital opened in the TMC in 1954, St. Joseph’s pediatric department maintained an affiliation with Baylor College of Medicine. In 2012, a branch was opened on the site of the former Heights Hospital at 1917 Ashland.
Dr. Mavis Kelsey of the Kelsey-Seybold Clinic was on staff in the 1950s. In 1960s plastic surgeon Dr. Thomas Cronin and resident Frank Gerow, working with Dow Corning, developed silicone gel breast implants. The Bloxsom air lock device for resuscitating newborns was developed by pediatrician Allan Bloxsom in 1950, though it fell out of favor by the end of the decade. Herman Barnett, the first African-American graduate of the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston and the first African-American appointee to the Texas State Board of Medical Examiners, finished his anesthesiology residency at St. Joseph’s in 1968 and then joined the medical staff.

St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital (Houston, Tex.)

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n82127374
  • 組織体
  • 1945-0000

St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital opened in 1945 as a private general hospital. It became affiliated with Texas Heart Institute in 1962 and Baylor College of Medicine in 2004. Catholic Health Initiatives acquired it in 2013 and the official name is CHI St. Luke's Health System.

Marcus, Marianne T.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n2017037881
  • 個人
  • 1932-2022

Marianne Taft Marcus, Ed.D., R.N., F.A.A.N of the University of Texas at Houston School of Nursing served as the John P. McGovern Distinguished Professor of Addiction Nursing and Director of the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, Education and Research. In these roles she explored mindfulness and meditation as methods of reducing stress for individuals in recovery and brought together people from diverse backgrounds to support prevention at the community-level. During her time at UT she also served as Chair of the Department of Nursing Systems and Director of the Master of Nursing Education Track, among other roles.

Following her studies at Columbia University, Dr. Marcus worked as a nurse at New York’s Presbyterian Hospital. After taking time to raise her children, she began teaching nursing and added two more graduate degrees from Columbia. In 1980 she returned to Houston, enrolling in the Education doctoral program at the University of Houston and beginning her longstanding affiliation with the UT Health Science Center.

Dr. Marcus received numerous recognitions throughout her career. Just some examples: in 1994 she was elected to a Fellowship in the American Academy of Nursing; in 1998 she was awarded the John P. McGovern Award for Excellence in Medical Education presented by the Association for Multidisciplinary Education and Research in Substance use and Addiction (AMERSA); and in 2006 she was elected to the University of Texas Academy of Health Science Education.

Dr. Marcus was born October 25, 1932 at Hermann Hospital in Houston. Her mother had been a nurse at Hermann, and her grandfather Gordon Avery Taft was on the Hermann Estate Board while the hospital was being built. Marianne Marcus died on January 16, 2022.

University of Texas School of Nursing

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n91091727
  • 組織体
  • 1972-

The Jane and Robert Cizik School of Nursing at UTHealth opened in 1972 in the Nurses’ Residence at Hermann Hospital as the University of Texas School of Nursing. It was to be the clinical campus of the UT System’s school of nursing, which was based at UTMB in Galveston. It moved into the Hermann Professional Building Annex shortly after, then to the former Prudential Life Building at 1100 Holcombe in 1974. The Houston setting became an official campus of the UT System Schools of Nursing in 1973, alongside Galveston, Austin, San Antonio, El Paso, and Fort Worth/Arlington. The first class graduated in 1974. Also in 1974 the School proposed a Master’s of Nursing degree (the first students would enroll in 1976) and specialized programs in gerontology, oncology, and psychiatric mental health nursing. In 1976, the School of Nursing joined the UT Health Science Center. The school continued to expand, adding specialized courses of study and Doctorate of Nursing degrees. It was renamed the Cizik School of Nursing in 2017.

Otto, Dorothy

  • 個人
  • d.2020

Dorothy Otto, EdD, MSN, RN, ANEF was an Associate Professor of Nursing Systems at the Cizik School of Nursing at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston.

Dorothy Otto started her nursing career in McAllen, Texas. When the UT School of Nursing in Houston was created in 1972, she came on board as a founding faculty member. Otto would continue to teach there until her retirement in 2015. She also served as acting dean from 1975-1977.

Dr. Otto received her BSN from the University of Houston in 1954; her MSN from Texas Woman's University in 1971; and her EdD from the University of Houston in 1985.

Dorothy Otto died January 4, 2020.

Source: https://www.uth.edu/news/story.htm?id=ca4f2d0e-ce7c-4bee-9130-6ed37226d990

Texas Medical Center

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n85810360
  • 組織体
  • 1946-

The Texas Medical Center is a comprehensive medical community located south of downtown Houston. It comprises 54 institutions, including four medical and seven nursing schools, 21 hospitals, three level-I trauma centers [8], eight specialty institutions, and academic and research institutions for many other health-related disciplines[9]. The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center is among the top-ranked cancer hospitals in the country[10]. As of 2017, it is one of the largest medical centers in the world[7].

The Texas Medical Center was proposed by Horace Wilkins, Col. William Bates, and John H. Freeman, the trustees of the M.D. Anderson Foundation. Established by cotton magnate Monroe Dunaway Anderson in 1936[1], the Foundation supported a variety of small causes until Anderson’s death in 1939, at which point the trustees, with the encouragement of Ernst Bertner, M.D., and Frederick Elliott, D.D.S., decided the funds should be used to build a medical center on par with Johns Hopkins and the Mayo Clinic[2]. When, in 1941, the state legislature approved an act to create a cancer hospital[3], the Anderson Foundation trustees secured Houston as the location for the M.D. Anderson Cancer Hospital, which would become first component of the medical center. The Texas Medical Center would be located on a site adjacent to Hermann Hospital, which had opened south of downtown in 1925.

The Texas Medical Center was officially incorporated in 1946 and Bertner was appointed president, replaced at the Cancer Hospital by R. Lee Clark, M.D. The Cancer Hospital was quickly joined by the Dental College, by then affiliated with the University of Texas[16], and Baylor University College of Medicine, which moved from Waco. The Anderson Foundation made grants to Methodist Hospital, Shriners Hospital for Crippled Children, St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital, Texas Children’s Hospital, a new building for Hermann Hospital, and for a library[15].

The Texas Medical Center grew quickly and has provided a home for innovators such as heart surgeons Michael DeBakey and Denton Cooley; William Spencer and his work on rehabilitation of paralysis patients; trauma surgeon and medevac pioneer James “Red” Duke; and Nobel Prize-winning pharmacology researcher Ferid Murad[17].

SOURCES:

[1-5] TMC History 1971
[6] Handbook of Texas Online, Ernst W. Bertner.
[7] Facts and Figures, About Houston, City of Houston, 2017 July 24, www.houstontx.gov/abouthouston/houstonfacts.html
[8] Texas Trauma Facilities, Texas Health and Human Services, Texas Department of Health and Human Services, 2017 July 24, https://www.dshs.texas.gov/emstraumasystems/etrahosp.shtm.
[9] “Texas Medical Center: Houston is where the world comes for treatment”, About Houston, Greater Houston Convention & Visitors Bureau, 2017 July 24, https://www.visithoustontexas.com/about-houston/texas-medical-center/
[10] Institutional profile, Facts and History, 2017 July 24, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, https://www.mdanderson.org/about-md-anderson/facts-history/institutional-profile.html.
[12] Handbook of Texas Online
[13] New York Times, 1994 May 05, online.
[11] Mary Schiflett obituary, Houston Chronicle online, January 19, 2007.
[14] Bryant Boutwell, Ph.D, Bout Time blog, 2014 January 31
[15] TMC History 1971, p178
[16] Handbook of Texas Online, University of Texas Dental Branch
[17] TMC News, 2014 August 19

Hartgraves, Ruth

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2004021115
  • 個人
  • 1991-1995

Ruth Hartgraves, MD, a Houston obstetrician and gynecologist who delivered more than 3,000 Houstonians and pioneered the trail for women in medicine during the span of her 50 year career, died October 17, 1995, at the age of 93. A native Texan, Dr. Hartgraves was born October 24, 1901 and moved to the Houston area during the 1930s to attend the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) in Galveston. She graduated from UTMB's School of Medicine in 1932, and thereafter completed an internship at the New England Hospital for Women and Children in Boston, and a residency at the New York Infirmary for Women and Children.

Dr. Hartgraves begain her career in Houston in 1935 and held appointments at Methodist, Hermann, Memorial, St. Luke's and Jefferson Davis Hospitals before retiring from practice in 1987. She was also a faculty member of Baylor College of Medicine for almost 30 years.

Dr. Hartgraves was the recipient of the 1992 Distinguished Professional Women's Award which is presented by the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. This award was presented in recognition of Dr. Hartgraves' outstanding achievements in Texas and the nation, for the significant contributions she made to her professional discipline, and for her pioneering spirit to mentor women and to provide a positive role model.

In 1985, she was awarded the Distinguished Alumnus Award from the University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Hartgraves was also the recipient of the 1980 Ashbel Smith Distinguished Alumnus Award granted by the UTMB School of Medicine alumni to graduates who have made significant contributions to the medical profession and to mankind.

She served as an organizer and the first President of the Houston branch of the American Medical Women's Association (AMWA), as well as President of the national AMWA organization. In 1975, her efforts earned her the AMWA's highest honor, the Elizabeth Blackwell Award, presented annually to a person making an outstanding contribution to the cause of women in medicine. Dr. Hartgraves was the first Texas physician to be so recognized.

She was a charter member of St. Luke's United Methodist Church and had a life-long record of involvement in community affairs, including the Houston Grand Opera, the Houston Ballet Society, and the Blue Bird Circle Clinic for Pediatric Neurology.

Houston Chronicle, Thursday, October 19, 1995.

Desmond, Murdina MacFarquhar

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n94801680
  • 個人
  • 1916-2003

Dr. Desmond was born in the Hebrides Islands of Scotland in 1916. Her family immigrated to the United States when she was 7. She attended Smith College on scholarship, graduating in 1938, and obtained her M.D. in 1942 from Temple School of Medicine. Following her internship and six months of pediatric residency, Dr. Desmond joined the U.S. Naval Reserve as a physician and actively served through World War II, including time at Pearl Harbor.

Postwar, she completed her pediatric training and a fellowship in newborn research. In 1948, she moved to Houston, Texas to join the faculty of Baylor College of Medicine in the Pediatric Department which at that time consisted of four faculty members and two residents. In 1950, Baylor became affiliated with the former Jefferson Davis Hospital and a newborn service was established. Dr. Desmond became the first head of the newborn care section in the Pediatric Department.

In 1956, Dr. Desmond and two other physicians were alarmed at the death rate from staphylococcus infections at Jefferson Davis Hospital, the then city-county hospital. The doctors declared the nursery unsafe and closed it to any more admissions. Shortly thereafter, Dr. Desmond began the first neonatal intensive care unit in the nation at the hospital. Dr. Desmond also worked with infants born with drug addictions. She developed the transitional nursery in which at risk infants were under close observation for potential medical problems. Infants who were seriously ill were placed in a separate unit, which became the first newborn intensive care unit in the southwestern states of the United States. Until Jefferson Davis Hospital closed, Dr. Desmond served as director of nurseries and as pediatric coordinator of its Maternal and Infant Care project.

During the outbreak of rubella in 1963-64, Dr. Desmond worked with about 200 affected infants and children. She recognized that many at-risk infants, whom medical care was able to save, developed conditions that required comprehensive evaluation and long-term care. In 1973 she became the director of the Leopold Meyer Center for Developmental Pediatrics at Texas Children's hospital. During this period she was on the team which cared for David Vetter, the "Bubble Boy." The Desmond Neonatal Developmental Follow-up Clinic, named for Dr. Desmond, was established in 1994 to provide logitudinal follow-up and neurodevelopmental assessments for pre-term babies.

Dr. Desmond received the Apgar Award from the American Academy of Pediatrics; the Stanley Kalinski Award from the Texas Pediatric Society; and awards from Smith College and Temple University among others.

Dr. Desmond married James L. Desmond who she met while serving in the Naval Reserve. They were married after the war and then moved to Houston, Texas, where her husband had a dental practice until his death in 1969. She and her husband had two children. Dr. Desmond passed away in 2003.

Dmochowski, Leon

  • 個人
  • 1909-1981

Leon Dmochowski was a virologist, experimental oncologist, and academic born on July 1, 1909 in Ternopil (Ukraine; at that time Austrian crown land of Galicia). He died on August 26, 1981 in Mexico City and was buried in Houston, Texas.

Dmochowski attended the Ukrainian Grammar School for Boys in Peremyshl, and in 1928-33 he studied at the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Lviv, where he gained a bachelor's degree. In 1934-35 he worked as a general practitioner at the Lviv university clinic. He subsequently obtained a grant from the J. Potocki Foundation for Scientific Investigation of Cancer and Tuberculosis and moved to Warsaw where, from 1935 to 1938, he was a research assistant in the cancer laboratoryy of the Polish State Institute of Hygiene, Department of Bacteriology and experimental Medicine. In 1973 he gained a Doctor of Medicine degree from Warsaw University.

Obtaining a one-year traveling fellowship from the Potocki Foundation, in 1938 he came to the United Kingdom where, unti l1946, he conducted research at the Imperial Cancer Research Fund (now Cancer Research UK). During this period he published five papers in the British Medical Journal, the British Journal of Experimental Pathology, the British Journal of Cancer and the Journal of Pathology and Bacteriology. in 1946 he moved to Leeds, where he worked as a researcher and lecturer in the Department of Experimental Pathology and Cancer Reasearch at the School of Medicine, University of Leeds. He also lectured in microbiology. In 1949 he obtained a second doctorate from Leeds University, and in 1950 was promoted to the position of reader at the university. In this period he published a further 24 papers in The Lancet (1947), Nature (1947, 1948, 1950, 1951) and other journals (Advances in Cancer Research, British Medical journal, Journal of the National Cancer Institute, Acta-Unio Internationalis Contra Cancrum, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences). In 1951, he was invited to give a series of lectures on oncology at a number of universities in the USA. in 1953-54 he was a visiting associate professor of microbiology at the Colombia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York. From 1949 to 1955 he was an adviser to the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration (UNRRA). He was a member of the Royal Society of Medicine, the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, the British Society of General Microbiology, and the Pathological Society oof Great Britain and Ireland.

Deciding to settle in the USA, in 1954 Dmochowski moved from New York to Houston, where in 1954-55 he was a professor of anatomy at the Baylor University of College of Medicine, and a consultant at the M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute (now University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center). He continued to work at M.D. Anderson where he was chief of the Section of Virology and Electron Microscopy (1955-65), acting head of the newly-established Department of Virology (1965-66), and, from 1966, professor and head of the Department of Virology. From 1955 he was also professor ofexperimental pathology at the University of Texas Postgraduate School of Medicine, and, from 1965, professor of virology at the new University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences. Additionally, he was a clinical professor at the Baylor University College of Medicine (from 1955), and a distinguished lecturer at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta (1966). After 1974 he continued with his academic and research work at M.D. Anderson. His main academic interests included virology, experimental oncology, immunology and serology of tumors, endocrinology, and electron microscopy in cancer diagnosis. He was the author or co-author of over 450 articles and papers, as well as chapters in several books. He was at the forefront of research into the role of viruses in oncology, one of the first researchers to report the viral origins of various malignant tumors (1953), and a pioneer in the application of electron microscopy in oncovirology. He also discovered viruses which cause leucosis in rodents and demonstrated the presence of such viruses in human beings.

Dmochowski was a member of the Ukrainian Physicians' Society in Lviv and the Ukrainian Medical Association of North America, and (from 1959) a full member of the Shevchenko Scientific Society in the US. He was also a member of the American Association for Cancer Research, the Electron Microscopy Society of America, the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine, the American Society for Microbiology, the New York Academy of Sciences, the Leukemia Society of America (National Board of Trustees, 1966-; National Medical and Scientific Advisory Board, 1966-1970), and the Pan American Cancer Cytology Society. He was an honorary member of the Chilean Society of Cancerology.

Source: Kovaliv, Yuriy B. (20 June 2014). Leon Dmochowski. Ukrainians in the United Kingdom. Retrieved from http://www.ukrainiansintheuk.info/eng/02/dmochowski-e.htm

Creson, Daniel Lenard

  • 個人
  • 1935-2015

Born in 1935, Dr. Daniel L. Creson was in in private practice with North Texas Psychiatry and Psychotherapy in Denton, Texas. He was Professor Emeritus at The University of Texas Health Science Center - Houston in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. He served there as Clinical Professor and Director of Continuing Education before his retirement in 2003. He was Board Certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology in 1971.

Dr. Creson received his medical degree from The University of Texas Medical Branch-Galveston, Texas in 1962. He earned an MA in Behavioral Science and a PhD in Anthropology from Rice University, Houston Texas. He holds academic appointments at Galveston Family Institute, The University of Texas Medical Branch - Galveston and The University of Texas Health Science Center - Houston. Among his past positions, he served as Adjunct Associate Professor at Tulane University, Executive Director of Gulf Coast Regional Mental Health-Mental Retardation Center, and Medical Director of Mental Health Mental Retardation Authority of Harris County.

Dr. Creson was active on several boards of mental health mental retardation organizations in Galveston and Houston as well as several committees for the Texas Society of Psychiatric Physicians. He has been a member of the Crisis Response Consortium of Harris County and Burn Disaster Response Team for Shriners Burn Institute. In addition to his past work in crisis situations throughout the world, he continues to serve as consultant to Humanitarian Aid and Medical Development (HMD) and Christian Children's Fund. Dr. Creson was instrumental in the development of an historical archives project, which seeks to document the history of mental health services in Texas. He personally obtained oral histories from many psychiatrists and other professionals throughout Texas.

Dr. Creson died November 30, 2015, in Sanger, Texas.

Dippel, A. Louis

  • 個人
  • 1901-1991

Adelbert Louis Dippel was born in Ehlinger (now Ellinger), Texas, near LaGrange in Fayette County, on July 10, 1901. His grandparents all emigrated from Germany around 1850. His family wanted him to become an engineer but he had decided on medicine when he was twelve and admired the family doctor who treated him for malaria. He attended Blinn College in Brenham before earning both a B.S. and an M.S. from the University of Texas in 1924, then an MD from UTMB in 1928. Renal calculi kept him out of the service during World War II. Dr. Dippel was an instructor and associate professor in obstetrics at Johns Hopkins University from 1934 to 1940, then at the University of Minnesota from 1940 to 1943; he was head of that department in 1943 and 1944. He then returned to Texas to take positions at Baylor College of Medicine and UTMB, where he remained until he retired in 1977. He died in Tacoma, Washington, on September 6, 1991.

Hayes, Teresa

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n2014189446
  • 個人
  • 1953-

Teresa Gray Hayes, MD, Ph.D. is an oncologist and an associate professor in hematology and oncology at Baylor College of Medicine. She earned both a Ph.D. and an MD from New York University School of Medicine, in 1981 and 1982, respectively

Hoff, Hebbel

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n85809755
  • 個人
  • 1907-1987

Hebbel Edward Hoff was born December 2, 1907, in Urbana, Illinois. His family moved to Washington state when he was a child and he was the valedictorian of the 1924 class of Bothell High School, Bothell, Washington. He studied medicine at the Universisty of Washington for four years before being awarded a Rhodes Scholarship to study at Oxford University in England. He completed his M.D. at Harvard University in 1936 and continued to do research in electrocardiology at Yale University. He won the Warren Scientific Treatise Prize in 1941 while working at Yale. He was chair of the McGill University (Toronto, Ontario, Canada) Physiology Department from 1943 to 1948, when he took a position with Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. He was dean of Baylor until his death on May 1, 1987.

Ledbetter, Paul V.

  • 個人
  • 1899-1983

Paul V. Ledbetter, MD, established the Ledbetter clinic in Houston in 1925. He died January 21, 1983. He had the first electrocardiographic (EKG) machine in the Houston area. Dr. Ledbetter was born in Sweet Home, Texas in 1899. He received his medical degree from the University of Texas Medical School in 1921. He helped to establish the Houston Society of Internal Medicine in 1945 and the Houston Heart Association in 1948. He was the first physician president. He also was instrumental in forming the St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital Board. He was a fellow of the American College of Physicians and was on the faculty at the Texas University Dental School.

Pokorny, Alex D.

  • 個人
  • 1918-2007

Born October 18, 1918 on a farm in Taylor, Texas; his grandparents were Czech immigrants. He graduated from Granger High School at 16 in 1934 and then from the University of Texas in 1939. He earned his MD from the University of Texas Medical Branch in December 1942, and then interned at Hermann Hospital in 1943. He served in the US Army Medical Corps from December 1943 to December 1946, as a lieutenant colonel and then a colonel. During his service, he graduated from the School of Military Neuropsychiatry. He was a resident in psychiatry at Southwestern Medical School in Dallas from November 1946 to June 1947 and at the Menninger School of Psychiatry, then located in Topeka, Kansas, from 1947 to 1949.
Dr. Pokorny joined the staff at the Houston VA Hospital in 1949 and became Chief of the Psychiatry Service in 1955; he remained at the VA until 1973. He was also part of the Baylor College of Medicine Department of Psychiatry from 1949 until his retirement in 1989. He was active in numerous professional organizations and won several awards for his contributions. He died October 9, 2007, just shy of his 89th birthday.

McCarty, Daniel J.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n79053864
  • 個人
  • 1928-

Dr. McCarty was born in Pennsylvania, possibly in Upper Darby, on October 31, 1928. He earned is BS from Villanova in 1950 and his MD from the University of Pennsylvania in 1954. He was a rheumatologist specializing in pseudogout, gout, and rheumatoid arthritis who taught in several academic institutions, including Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital in Philadelphia, the University of Chicago medical school, and the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. He came to Wisconisn in 1974 after seven years at the University of Chicago and supervised the founding of the Medical College of Wisconsin’s Arthritis Institute in 1989. He was a visiting professor at the University of Texas Medical School. At the time of writing this in March 2020 I have been unable to find an obituary.

Catlin, Francis

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2010040748
  • 個人
  • 1925-2014

Francis Irving Catlin was born on December 6, 1925 in Hartford, Connecticut. He received his Doctor of Medicine degree in 1948 from Johns Hopkins University, where he also served two residencies in otolaryngology and head and neck surgery. Dr. Catlin served in the U.S. Air Force Medical Corps from 1950-1952 at the rank of Captain and was the Assistant Chief of E.N.T. Service, U.S. Air Force, 1100th Medical Group, Bolling Air Force Base in Washington, D.C. Dr. Catlin taught and conducted research as a faculty member at Johns Hopkins from 1955-1972. There, he was a part of the Department of Otolaryngology in the School of Medicine, the School of Public Health and Hygiene’s Environmental Medicine Department, and the Public Administration. In 1972 Dr. Catlin and his family moved to Houston, Texas, where he accepted the appointments as Professor at the Baylor College of Medicine in the Department of Otorhinolaryngology; as Chief-of-Service in the department of Otolaryngology at St. Luke’s Episcopal the and Texas Children’s Hospitals; and as the Director of the Speech, Language, and Learning Disorders at the Texas Children’s Hospital. Dr. Catlin died Februayr 24, 2014 and is buried in Church Hill, Maryland. Print finding aid by Margaret Irwin, 1992/1996

Harrington, Paul R.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n88169070
  • 個人
  • 1911-1980

Dr. Paul Harrington (September 27, 1911- November 29, 1980) was an orthopedic surgeon and former chief of surgical services at TIRR. He died Nov. 29, 1980.He was interested in polio and scoliosis. He developed a surgical procedure for the correction of curvature of the spine.

Hickey, Robert

  • 個人
  • 1915-2006

Dr. Robert Cornelius Hickey was born December 9, 1915 in Hallstead, Pennsylvania. He received a bachelor’s degree from Cornell University in 1938 and his MD, also from Cornell University, in 1942. After graduating, he went to University of Iowa, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, and the National Cancer Institute for advanced training in both radiology and surgery. He worked in University of Iowa College of Medicine, M.D Anderson, University of Wisconsin Medical School, and the American Association of Endocrine Surgeons. He developed several techniques for treating patients with various endocrine tumors.

Dr. Hickey died May 17, 2006, in Madison, Wisconsin.

Preston, Jane H.

  • 個人
  • 1920-2001

Evelyn Jane Hawkins Preston was born in Houston on November 21, 1920; she was a third-generation Texan. She graduated from Baylor College of Medicine in 1953 and practiced in Houston until 1978, then in Austin between 1978 and 1995, when she retired and returned to her hometown. Dr. Preston was a pioneer of telemedicine. She died November 7, 2001, just shy of her 81st birthday.

Russell, William O.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no2003084619
  • 個人
  • 1910-1997

Dr. William Ogburn Russell, Jr., was born in March 24, 1910 in San Jose, California, and frew up on the Russell Ranch near Sacramento. He earned his MD from Stanford University in 1938. He completed his residency at the Mallory Institute in Boston, Massachusetts, and then returned to California to practice pathology in Santa Barbara. He moved to Houston in 1948 the first chair of the pathology department at UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, where he remained until 1977. After his retirement from UT MDA he moved to Florida and spent ten years as director of pathology at North Ridge Medical Center in Fort Lauderdale. Russell was married to Marolyn Cowart Russell, MD, who was also faculty at MD Anderson. He died in August 2, 1997, and is interred at Woodland Cemetery, Woodland, California.
Thirteen linear feet of his papers are available at the UC Davis archives.

Jensen, Francine

  • 個人
  • 1917-2004

Francine Jensen was born August 1, 1917, in Memphis, Tennessee. She earned a BA from the University of Texas, an MD from UTMB, and a Master’s of Public Health from Tulane University, and did both an internship and residency at Jefferson Davis Hospital. In the 1940s she became the assistant director of Harris County’s Chronic Illness Prevention Program, which was intended to help people manage ailments such as diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. She was the director of the Houston Public Health Department’s CICP for six years and ultimately became the HPHD’s first female director. She retired in 1985. She held faculty appointments with Baylor College of Medicine and the University of Texas School of Public Health. She died November 8, 2004, in Houston

Voss, William R.

  • 個人
  • 1932-1999

William Ralph Voss, DVM, was born March 11, 1932, in Parkdale, Arkansas, and died March 7, 1999, in or near Houston. he seems to have lived and possibly practiced in the Crosby, Texas, area. He is buried in the San Jacinto Memorial Park.

Able, Luke William

  • 個人
  • 1912-2006

Luke William Able was born August 2, 1912 in Port Arthur, Texas, and his family moved to Houston when he was six. He earned his Bachelor’s from the University of Texas in 1933 and his MD from UTMB in 1940. He enlisted in 1942 while he was an intern at Hermann Hospital. Able survived a kamikaze attack on the USS Aulick in Leyte Gulf in the Pacific Theater on November 19, 1944. He suffered a shattered leg and other injuries but directed the treatment of wounded until he passed out from his own injuries. He was awarded a Silver Star and a Purple Heart and spent two years in the hospital recovering.
After the war, he trained at Children’s Hospital in Boston. He was head of the surgery department of Texas Children’s Hospital from 1954 to 1987. In 1964, he participated in one of the early separations of conjoined twins in Texas.
Dr. Able retired in 1988 due to complications from his World War II wounds. He died March 16, 2006 in Franklin, North Carolina.

Meyer, John S.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n50031311
  • 個人
  • 1924-2011

John Stirling Meyer was born February 24, 1924, in London, England. He earned a scholarship to the Kent School in Connecticut when he was 16, during World War II, which got him out of London. H earned his BS at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut, a Master’s from the Montreal Neurological Institute, and an MD and CM from McGill University. He completed his training at Yale University and later earned additional degrees in neurology and psychiatry, neurophysiology, and neuropathology from Harvard.
Dr. Meyer became a US citizen (in 1952?) when he was needed for the Korean War. He was drafted by the Navy and sent to the Pacific, where he was put in charge of head injuries, first on hospital ships and then at the US-commandeered Yokosuka Hospital in Japan.
He returned to Harvard for a few years and then in 1957, when he was only 33, he became a founding professor and chairman of neurology at Wayne State University School of Medicine. At the time, he was the youngest person ever to hold the position as chair and professor of a medical department in the United States.
Dr. Meyer worked on the President’s Commission on Heart Disease, Cancer, and Stroke under both Kennedy and Johnson, and came to Houston to Baylor College of Medicine after catching the attention of Michael DeBakey. Dr. Meyer wrote or edited 30 textbooks and 930 articles. He retired from Baylor as a professor emeritus but was still working at United Neurology when he died on February 17, 2011. He is buried at St. John the Divine Episcopal Church Cemetery in Houston.

Stanley, J. Richard

  • 個人
  • 1905-

This material was sold through the Stanley family medical supply store in Houston. The material in the collection dates from the 1930s to 1950s.

Steinberger, Emil

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n79113192
  • 個人
  • 1928-2008

Dr. Steinberger was born December 20, 1928 in Berlin, Germany, and grew up in Poland. Both of his parents were dentists. His family fled to the Soviet Union in 1939, spent two years in the Gulag Nuziyary, and then settled in Kazakhstan. They returned to Poland after the war but then resettled in American-occupied Germany, at Kassel. Steinberg began medical school in Frankfurt but emigrated to New York in 1947. The rest of the family followed a year later.
Steinberg married Anna (surname?), whom he had met in Kazakhstan, and they ended up in Iowa City, where Steinberg earned his MD from the University of Iowa in 1955. He volunteered for the US Navy for two years and then returned to academics. He was chair of the Department of Endocrinology and Human Reproduction and Albert Einstein Medical Center in Philadelphia from 1961 to 1971. In 1971, he moved to Houston to join the new UT Medical School as head of the Department of Reproductive Medicine. He left UT in 1984 to establish the Texas Institute for Reproductive Medicine and Endocrinology (note, as of 2020 this seems not to be in independent operation any more). He retired in 2001.
Dr. Steinberger died in his sleep of lung cancer on October 12, 2008, in Houston. He is buried at Emanu El Memorial Park in Houston.

Detering, Herman E., III

  • 個人
  • 1938-2015

Herman Eberhard Detering, III, was born July 2, 1938, in Houston; his father H.E. Detering, Jr. (1902-1977) was also born in Houston and his grandfather H.E. Detering, Sr. (1862-1927), was born in Germany but came to Houtson in 1871. Detering, Sr., was the founder of The Detering Company Building Supplies, which is still operated (as of 2020) by the family. H.E. Detering, III, created this collection because of his interest in 19th century photography and psychiatry. Mr. Detering was the longtime owner of the Detering Book Gallery, a rare bookstore in the Houston area. He died March 21, 2015

Aday, Lu Ann

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n79107852
  • 個人
  • 1946-

Lu Ann Aday was born in Waxahachie, Texas, on August 19, 1946. She earned her bachelor’s degree in agricultural economics in 1968 from Texas Tech University and then went to Purdue University for a Master’s in 1970 and then, in 1973, a doctorate in sociology. She was the associate director of the Center for Health Administration Studies at the University of Chicago before teaching at the University of Texas School of Public Health.

Rehrauer, Walter

  • 個人
  • 1890-1981

Walter Rehrauer was born in New York City on August 3, 1890. His family moved to Houston around 1911 and he graduated from the Texas Dental College in 1914. He served in the U.S. Navy or Naval Reserve during World War I, the inter-war period, World War II and beyond. He died at Brooke Army Medical Center at Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio on March 11, 1981, and is buried at Fort Sam Houston National Cemetery.

Bergstrom, Nancy

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n95034328
  • 個人

Fields, William

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n50023365
  • 個人
  • 1913-2004

William Straus Fields was born in Baltimore, Maryland on August 18, 1913. He graduated from Harvard with his A.B. cum laude in 1934 and then with his M.D. from Harvard Medical School in 1938. He was a recipient of the Mary and Matthew E. Bartlett Scholarship there from 1935-1938. following graduation he was an intern in pathology at Nashville General Hospital and the Department of Pathology at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine until 1939. From 1939-1940 he was an intern in medicine at the Children's Memorial Hospital in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. He then served as the assistant resident in medicine at the Royal Victoria Hospital in Montreal from 1940-1941. He served for five and a half months in neurosurgery at the Montreal Neurological Institute before joining the Royal Canadian Navy.

While serving the Royal Canadian Navy, William Fields held ranks from Surgeon-Lieutenant to Surgeon-Commander. He was part of the Naval Research Division doing wartime research at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Banting Institute at the University of Toronto from 1943-1945. From 1945-1946 he served as the Principal Medical Officer for the Naval Officer in Charge at the Port of Montreal. Following his service in the Royal Canadian Navy, he was the Rockefeller Fellow in Neuropsychiatry at Washington University School of Medicine and resident in Neurology at Barnes Hospital in St. Louis, Missouri from 1946 to 1949.

He was appointed to Associate Professor of Neurology at Baylor College of Medicine in 1949 and he served until 1951. In 1951 he was promoted to Professor of Neurology and in 1959, he became Chairman of the Department of Neurology where he served until 1965. we served as a Professor of Neurology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas and then at The University of Texas Medical School in Houston where he ultimately became the Chairman of the Department of Neurology. He also held staff and consulting positions at many Texas and Houston-area hospitals.

During his career he served the Methodist Hospital, Jefferson Davis and Ben Taub Hospitals, Parkland Memorial Hospital and Presbyterian Hospital, St. Luke's Episcopal, and Texas Children's Hospitals and St. Joseph Hospital, St. Anthony Center and Hermann Hospital as a staff member. He also worked as a consultant for Hermann, St. Luke's Texas Children's, M.D. Anderson and Diagnostic Center Hospitals, the Veterans Administration, Wilford Hall AF Hospital, St. Paul Hospital and Baylor University Medical Center, and the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute.

Huang, Charles T. L.

  • 個人
  • 1938-2011

Possibly born 1938 October 12 in Tsienkiang, Fukien, China, as Tzu Lee Huang; added Charles upon naturalization in 1975. Arrived in US in 1969. Died December 25, 2011.

Kellar, William Henry

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n98061908
  • 個人
  • 1952-0000

Karff, Samuel

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n79063928
  • 個人
  • 1931-2020

Samuel Egal Karff was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on September 19, 1931. He graduated from Harvard University. He served as rabbi for Houston's Beth Israel congregation from 1974 to 1999. After his retirement from Beth Israel, he founded the Texas Medical Center's Health and Human Spirit Program, the forerunner of the McGovern Medical School's Center for Humanities and Ethics. He also lectured for Rice University's Department of Religion for twenty-two years. He was a longtime advocate for civil rights, social justice, and equality, and is honored at Interfaith Ministries for Great Houston's Brigitte and Bashar Kalai's Plaza of Respect, alongside Reverend William Lawson and Archbishop Joseph Fiorenza. Karff died on August 14, 2020.

Buja, Louis Maximilian

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n82138621
  • 個人
  • 1942 -

Born December 30, 1942 in New Orleans, Louisiana. He attended Jesuit High School and then graduated in 1964 from Loyola University with a BS in biology. He earned his MD with honors from Tulane University in 1967, with an additional MS in anatomy in 1968. Dr. Buja worked for the National Institute of Health between 1968 and 1974, when he moved to the department of pathology at the University of Texas Southwest Medical Center in Dallas. In 1989 he was appointed chair of the pathology department of the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, where he became dean in 1996.

Texas Children's Hospital

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n79032728
  • 組織体
  • 1954-

Texas Children’s Hospital admitted its first patient in February 1954 and is among the largest pediatric hospitals in the US. It is affiliated with Baylor College of Medicine and was a contributor to the establishment of the Texas Heart Institute. Over the decades, it has pioneered treatments such as in-home care for respiratory failure; separation of conjoined twins; treatment and management of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID); biosynthetic growth hormone treatment; laser therapy for seizure disorders, early diagnosis and treatment of cystic fibrosis, and pediatric HIV. It has branches all over the Houston metro area, in Austin and operates a pediatric HIV/AIDS clinic in Uganda.

Institute for Rehabilitation and Research (Houston, Tex.)

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n85028550
  • 組織体
  • 1951-

The Institute for Rehabilitation and Research was opened by William Spencer, MD, as the Southwestern Poliomyelitis Respiratory Center in 1951 at the peak of the US polio epidemic. It officially became The Texas Institute for Rehabilitation and Research in 1959, then just The Institute for Rehabilitation and Research in 1978. After the development of a vaccine in the early 1960s, Dr. Spencer shifted the practice to the rehabilitation of the catastrophically injured. As it expanded, the Institute recruited doctors who would become major contributors in specific areas of concern, such as Gunyon Harrison (pediatric cystic fibrosis), Carlos Vallbona (physiology and cardiology), Paul Harrington (orthopedic surgeon and developer of Harrington rods); and Bobby Alford (ENT). TIRR is affiliated with Baylor College of Medicine and the McGovern Medical School, and joined Memorial Hermann in 2006.

Junior League of Houston Children's Clinic

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n82159045
  • 組織体
  • 1925-

The Junior League of Houston was founded in 1925 with the purpose of establishing a well-baby clinic for the city’s underserved. By 1927, the clinic was operating out of the First National Bank Building. It would later partner with Hermann Hospital. The clinic moved into Hermann’s outpatient department in 1944, where it served as a training institution for Baylor College of Medicine, and was renamed the Junior League Children’s Health Clinic of Hermann Hospital Outpatient Department. Around this time, the Junior League started a second program to assist patients, not only children, during their hospital stays. The Junior League opened its Diagnostic Clinic associated with Texas Children’s Hospital even before TCH was officially opened in 1954. They began working with new young mothers through the Baylor Teen Clinic in 1974, and donated the SuperKids Pediatric Mobile clinic in 2000 to help improve immunization rates and provide health checks to children whose families have a hard time traveling to a doctor. The Junior League continues to fund-raise and provide volunteer support for dozens of Houston health institutions.

Houston-Galveston Area Council

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n80006171
  • 組織体
  • 1966-

Founded in 1966 and funded by the US Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, the H-GAC is the regional planning and oversight organization through which local governments consider issues and cooperate in solving area-wide problems. H-GAC serves thirteen counties in the Houston-Galveston area. The greater HGAC includes departments of community and environmental planning (conservation, historic map collection), data services (geographic, information technology, web development, regional 911); finance and budget; human services (independent living for seniors; job placement; and aid for low-income persons); public services; and transportation.
The Health Systems Agency specifically seeks to promote the development of health systems in the region by determining need, developing an implementation plan, reviewing data, and reviewing applications for assistance. Among their missions “is to facilitate the procurement of goods and services in an open, fair, transparent, and economically competitive environment”.

Spina Bifida Association of Texas, Inc.-Houston Chapter

  • 組織体
  • 1975-

This is now Spina Bifida Houston Gulf Coast. They are no longer associated with the national organization and have changed their name to reflect that. Their primary focus now is The Camp That Love Built, a camp for children with spina bifida. This started in 1975 as a camp for special-needs children and moved to Burton, Texas, in 1998

Robert Welch Foundation

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n80040117
  • 組織体
  • 1954-

Robert Alonzo Welch was born in South Carolina and came to Houston around 1886. He started working for the Bute Paint Company (1867-1990) in 1891 as a bookkeeper and resigned in 1927 as secretary-treasurer but remained on it Board of Directors. In the early 1900s, he began investing in oil. When he died in 1952, 15% of his $25 million estate was divided among his 29 employees and the rest was used to establish the Robert A. Welch Foundation in 1954. The Welch Foundation is still a major source of funding for chemistry research in Texas.

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