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Macon, N. Don
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“The Texas Medical Center”, Methodist Hospital, Raymond O’Leary, production by TMC, Inc, color

This film contains a program titled “The Texas Medical Center” from approximately 1972. It begins with an overview of the TMC and its history. The bulk of the program is dedicated to a video tour of the TMC, offering brief characterizations of many of its hospitals and educational institutions.

The credits read: “The Texas Medical Center. This film was made possible through the cooperation of the administrators and staff of all institutions in the Texas Medical Center. Production coordinated by Texas Medical Center, Inc. with the full support and cooperation of the Council of Directors and Administrators. These people made special contributions of their technical skills: Manfred Gygli, William R. Pittman, Gloria J. Heard, Herbert R. Smith, Mario Paoloski, Ken Wiedower, Joachim Zwer. Narrated by Don Macon. Produced and Directed by Raymond O’Leary.”

The U-matic tape AVV-IC002-005 is a transfer/duplicate of this program.

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Interview with W. Leland Anderson

W. Leland Anderson. Interviewed by Don Macon. Mr. Anderson, President of the Board of TMC, Inc., discusses the Anderson Clayton Company and the family relationship with the founders. He talks about his uncle, Mr. M. D. Anderson, Dr. E. W. Bertner and the trustees of the M. D. Anderson Foundation. He discusses the evolution of the Texas Medical Center and the formation of the TMC, Inc., defining the function of its Board of Directors. (MDAH Master #64-1-73)

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Interview with Hines H. Baker

Hines H. Baker. Interviewed by Don Macon. Mr. Baker, former President of Humble Oil & Refining Company, reviews his long association there and later with Standard Oil. He tells of his early life on farms in Big Valley and Medina, Texas and the basis of his decision to become a lawyer. He recalls his education in a rural school and the home study required to secure entrance credits into the University of Texas, part of which he earned by passing the examination for a teacher's certificate. Graduating with academic and law degrees, Mr. Baker practiced for a time before joining Humble Oil & Refining Company in 1919. He discusses his participation in the Ex-Student Association and the Development Board of the University of Texas, his membership on the Board of TMC, Inc. and his work with the Houston Chamber of Commerce and their successful fundraising campaign for construction in the Texas Medical Center. Mr. Baker reveals his love for his family and his church. He pays tribute to the University of Texas for the important part it played in his life as he says what education means. (MDAH Master #48-1-73)

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Interview with Colonel William B. Bates, Part 1 of 3

Col. William B. Bates, Part 1 of 3. Interviewed by Don Macon. Col. Bates, a prominent attorney, educator and philanthropist, tells of his childhood on a farm in Nacogdoches where he was one of 13 children. He worked his way through school and graduated from the University of Texas School of Law in Austin in 1915, after which he established his first law practice in Bay City; this was interrupted by World War I where Col. Bates had an illustrious military career. (Continued in Part 2) (MDAH Master #29-1-73)

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Interview with Colonel William B. Bates, Part 2 of 3

Col. William B. Bates, Part 2 of 3. Interviewed by Don Macon. Col. Bates discusses some of his experiences as district attorney in three East Texas counties shortly after World War I. These include bootleggers and members of the Klu Klux Klan. In later 1922, he traveled to Houston seeking a connection to further his career in law. He joined the firm of Fulbright & Crooker on January 1, 1923. Mr. John Freeman became a partner in the firm, as did Col. Bates. Col. Bates worked closely with members of the Anderson-Clayton firm for many years. He tells of his association with Mr. M. D. Anderson and the eventual establishment of the M. D. Anderson Foundation. Col. Bates relates the story of the planning and implementation of the state cancer research hospital, its temporary quarters in the Baker estate, the concept of a Texas Medical Center and acquisition of its land, the move of Baylor College of Medicine from Dallas to Houston, the permanent structure for the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Research Institute, the University of Texas Dental Branch, and other institutions in the medical center. (MDAH Master #29-1-73)

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Interview with Colonel William B. Bates, Part 3 of 3

Col. William B. Bates, Part 3 of 3. Interviewed by Don Macon. Col. Bates discusses further the relationships of the M. D. Anderson Foundation and the institutions in the Texas Medical Center. He speaks of Dr. E. W. Bertner and Dr. R. Lee Clark. Col. Bates then turns to his interest in education and Texas History. He describes the evolution of the University of Houston and his participation in the San Jacinto historical Association. A discussion of the involvement of the Houston Chamber of Commerce in the development of the Texas Medical Center concludes the series. (MDAH Master #30-1-73)

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Interview with Isaac Berenblum, MD, and Philippe Shubik, D.Phil., DM

"Video Profiles": An interview with Isaac Berenblum, MD, and Philippe Shubik, D.Phil., DM, Recipients of the 1978 Ernst W. Bertner Memorial Award. Interviewed by Don Macon. An MDA-TV Presentation. Department of Medical Communication. Produced for Office of the President. 3/3/1978. (Program #94-1-78). The recording runs 28:43 minutes.
(0:01) Don Macon introduces the program and speakers. He notes the occasion of the 31st Annual Symposium on Fundamental Cancer Research, held in Houston and sponsored by M. D. Anderson, the National Cancer Institute, and the American Cancer Society, Texas Division, as well as in cooperation with the University of Texas Health Science Center and the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences. He introduces Professor Isaac Berenblum, Professor Emeritus at the Weizmann Institute in Israel, and Dr. Philippe Shubik of the Eppley Institute for Research in Cancer in Nebraska.
(2:24) The interview starts with Berenblum explaining their relationship and how they devised experiments together at Oxford. Berenblum then gives an account of his time as a medical student, primarily interested in research rather than practicing medicine. At the time a new cancer department was being established at Leeds University. After eight years at Leeds he received a fellowship and went to Oxford.
(6:12) Shubik offers his own account of medical school at Oxford and his desire to do research. He then served as a doctor during the war. He discusses the School of Pathology at Oxford and the opportunity to study with the discoverers of penicillin as well as Berenblum. During his clinical education he saw the first patients treated with penicillin. He speaks about Berenblum’s approach and influence. He notes how his exposure to tropical medicine, preventative medicine, and environmental factors influenced his approach to cancer research.
(9:13) Macon steers the conversation to the Bertner Award they have just received. work. Berenblum discusses the phases of their work with carcinogenesis. He describes their initial excitement, a “latent period,” where others did not show much interest, and a time about 10 years ago when the idea gained traction. He says clinicians and epidemiologists noticed that what they'd been studying in animals could have application to people. He notes there are now 20-25 research centers actively pursuing the two-step mechanism.
(11:45) Shubik notes how the slow-running experiments offered him time to do research and chemistry, as well as to get his license to work with animals. Berenblum had done work on environmental carcinogens. He reflects on their small but fairly comprehensive program in carcinogenesis.
(14:50) Berenblum discusses his move to start a new department at the Weizmann Institute in Israel in 1950. They had suggested a department of cancer research, whereas he proposed a department of experimental biology. He notes a colleague did the same for biochemistry.
(17:50) Berenblum speaks to the development of academic excellence at that Institute and within Israel generally.
(20:24) Shubik discusses his move from Oxford to Nebraska, including at stop at Northwestern University. He then had the opportunity to build a new department at the new Chicago Medical School, which allowed him to run some experiments he was interested in. He discusses experiments. He notes he moved to Omaha in the late 1960s and highlights that program’s emphasis on carcinogenesis.
(26:32) Berenblum interjects with a story relating to the question of scholarship in Israel.
(27:24) The interview wraps up.

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Interview with Ted Bowen

Mr. Ted Bowen. Interviewed by Don Macon. Video tape recorded 4/26/1974. Approximately 30min. Color-sound. MDAH Master #94-1-74. Produced for Texas Medical Center Historical Resources Project. Summary: Mr. Bowen discussed his youth in Alto, Texas and college in Nacogdoches, after which he returned home to work as cashier at a local bank. He spoke of his military service at Camp Gruber, Oklahoma where as a member of the medical detachment he was an administrative officer for the large hospital there. He attributes his interest in hospital administration to this experience. After the war, Mr. Bowen said he attended Washington University and on graduation with an MA in Hospital Administration went to Barnes Hospital in St. Louis. Mr. Bowen discussed Mrs. Josie Roberts, Mrs. Ella Fondren, Mr. Hines H. Baker and others. He also discussed The Methodist Hospital's plans for the future.

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Interview with Dr. Benjamin F. Byrd, Jr.

Dr. Benjamin F. Byrd, Jr. Interviewed by Don Macon. Video tape recorded 1/23/1976. Approximately 25min, Color-sound, MDAHH Master #473-1-76. Produced for the University of Texas - Texas Medical Center Historical Resources Project. Summary: Dr. Byrd, current President of the American Cancer Society, discussed his educational training at Vanderbilt in Nashville, Tennessee where he was born and raised. He spoke of his own studies in cancer and those of the American Cancer Society and the American College of Surgeons Cancer Commission. Emphasis was lent to environmental and nutritional factors in breast cancer.

Interview with Benjamin L. Bird

Video Profiles: Interview with Benjamin L. Bird by Don Macon. An MDA-TV Presentation. Department of Medical Communication. Produced for the Office of the President. 6/22/1977. The recording runs 20:02 minutes.
(0:17) Don Macon introduces Ben Bird and explains his connection to the M. D. Anderson Hospital.
(1:46) Bird shares some details of his biography. He grew up, was educated, and worked in Oklahoma and Texas. He studied law at the University of Texas in Austin. He notes his associations with members of the University’s Board of Regents.
(6:53) He outlines the tax and legal issues he was brought in to sort out on behalf of M. D. Anderson Cancer Hospital. He discusses the creation of the Association of Physicians as well as the University Cancer Foundation. This balanced M. D. Anderson’s tax-exempt status with R. Lee Clark’s desire to attract and retain top talent.
(12:26) Bird continues to elaborate on the legal and tax instruments he helped establish for M. D. Anderson: the Institutional Plan, the Director’s Regulations, and the University Cancer Foundation.
(15:36) Bird’s discusses his other work and interests. He highlights his work for Abilene Christian College.

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Interview with Benjamin L. Bird

Video Profiles: Interview with Benjamin L. Bird by Don Macon. An MDA-TV Presentation. Department of Medical Communication. Produced for the Office of the President. 6/21/1977. The recording runs 37:29 minutes.
(0:20) Don Macon introduces Benjamin L. Byrd and explains his connection to the M. D. Anderson Hospital.
(1:28) Bird shares some details of his biography. He grew up, was educated, and worked in Oklahoma and Texas. He discusses his time in the oil field, as well as at Harvard. He later studied law at the University of Texas in Austin.
(6:40) Bird discusses his involvement in debate and public speaking. He notes his associations with members of the University of Texas’ Board of Regents—Tom Sealy, Bob Sorrell, and Leroy Jeffers.
(8:32) Bird elaborates on this time at the law school, including a role as law librarian.
(10:43) He discusses the beginning of his law practice in Fort Worth in 1931.
(11:50) Bird discusses the development of his career and his expertise in tax law. He notes a 2-year stint in Washington, D.C., followed by time in St. Louis, and his return to Texas to form the firm Weeks, Bird, and Cannon (later Appleman).
(16:03) Bird talks of meeting his wife, Emily Loving. He got to know her while working for her father, a U.S. District Court Judge.
(17:50) Bird speaks of his partner Weeks, Dr. R. Lee Clark, and their Wichita Falls connection.
(18:40) Bird recounts his emergent professional connection with the University of Texas in the 1950s. He outlines the tax and legal issues he was brought in to sort out on behalf of the University and the M. D. Anderson Cancer Hospital.
(22:06) He elaborates on the tax matters and his interactions with R. Lee Clark. He mentions the Physicians’ Referral Service and the question of whether a Charitable Hospital could have Unrelated Business Income.
(26:16) Macon offers a history of the origins of M. D. Anderson Hospital and the Texas Medical Center.
(30:24) Bird elaborates on the legal and tax instruments he helped establish for M. D. Anderson: University Cancer Foundation, Constitution for the Hospital, Director’s Regulations.
(36:18) Macon wraps up the interview.

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Interview with Randolph Lee Clark, MD

Randolph Lee Clark, MD. Interviewed by Don Macon. Dr. Clark was the son of educators and long-time president of MD Anderson Hospital. Dr. Clark discusses his personal and family history in the Texas towns of Hereford, Midland, and Wichita Falls. He talked about the founding of Add-Ran College, now known as Texas Christian University in Fort Worth, named after his great uncles Addison and Randolph Clark. Dr. Clark related his early interest in sports and activities at the summer resort of the College of the YMCA at Blue Ridge, South Carolina, where he worked for two seasons. He revealed the impact on his professional years of the 18 months he directed research for DuPont at their Newark, New Jersey Plant, after his graduation from the Universality of South Carolina with degrees in Chemical Engineering, English and Pre-Med, and before receiving his MD from the Medical College of Virginia in 1932. He talks about his fascinating career, his professional associations at home and abroad, his pioneering work in surgery and his long association with and love for the Anderson. The interview ends when he receives a phone call from the University of Texas. 11/30/1973, Color-sound. Produced for Texas Medical Center Historical Resources Project.

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Interview with Jared E. Clarke, MD

Jared E. Clarke, MD. Interview by Don Macon. Dr. Clarke, long time Houston physician, discusses his personal family history and his interest in medicine due to physicians in his family. He discusses his education and noted that he knew Dr. Bertner at the University of Texas Medical branch in Galveston although he was two years behind him, graduating in 1913. Dr. Clarke spoke of the hospital facilities in Houston after his return from World War I and the services of doctors prior to the era of the founding and development of the Texas medical Center. Dr. Clarke talked about the founding of the Houston Academy of Medicine and the beginnings of the library now housed in the Jesse H. Jones - TMC Library building. 2/11/1974, 43min, Color-sound (MDAH Master #83-1-74).

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Interview with Dr. Edward J. Cooksey, Part 1 of 2

Dr. Edward J. Cooksey, Part 1 of 2. Interviewed by Don Macon. Dr. Cooksey describes his early years growing up in Houston and of his first career as a pharmacist, before entering the Texas Dental College, where he taught pharmacology while studying for his DDS; he continued to teach there for many years. He tells how the school became part of the University of Texas System. He recounts his personal interest in the Houston Dental Society and his role in planning the Doctors Club. (Continued in Part 2). 5/2/1974, 25:30, (MDAH Master #96-1-74)

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Interview with Dr. Edward J. Cooksey, Part 2 of 2

Dr. Edward J. Cooksey, Part 2 of 2. Interviewed by Don Macon. Dr. Cooksey continues his discussion about the Doctors Club and its planning, rules and management style. Having served as the president, he recalls the care, attention to service, and pride in the end product that are characteristic of the club. He talks about the various managers and the uneven financial stability of the club before the arrival of the current manager, Eddie Marks. He tells of the days before the TMC was formed when Hermann Hospital and Rice Institute were in the country and land could be purchased for $5.00 an acre. 5/2/1974, 26min (MDAH Master #96-2-74)

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Interview with Pierre Denoix, MD

Interview with Pierre Denoix, MD by Don Macon. An MDA-TV Production, Medical Communication. Produced for the Office of the President. September 30, 1976. Program# 648-1-76. Runtime is 29:53 minutes.
(0:17) Macon introduces Pierre Denoix, Director of the Institut Gustave Roussy in Paris, France. He was visiting Houston for the rededication of the expanded MD Anderson Cancer Center and for meetings of the International Union Against Cancer, Committee on International Collaborative Activates.
(1:08) Denoix offers details of his biography, beginning with his birth and education in Paris.
(4:30) Denoix describes the beginning of his professional career. He also discusses his involvement in the French underground and his arrest during World War II.
(7:49) He describes the Institute and his early career there. He highlights the multi-disciplinary approach. He also recounts his experience spending three months at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Maryland.
(11:02) Denoix offers his thoughts on how to design and operate a comprehensive cancer center, highlighting protocols, regulations, and relationships.
(13:44) He describes his role as Surgeon General of France. He also speaks about the national healthcare system in France.
(16:16) He speaks to issues of motivation, including financial, for physicians. He also discusses the projected supply and demographics of French doctors. Continuing education is also addressed.
(20:07) Denoix discusses the knowledge and attitude of “typical” French citizens regarding health. He reflects on strategies to improve the connection between citizens and doctors. He speaks to the importance of family doctors and diagnosis.
(22:31) He discusses the importance of basic research and clinical research. He speaks to how it is organized at his Institute.
(24:13) Denoix speaks to his international involvement, including in the International Union Against Cancer. He also discusses his focus on comprehensive cancer care and prevention.
(26:51) He discusses progress in the “conquest” of cancer.
(27:39) The interview concludes with Macon prompting a discussion of the Louvre.

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Interview with Dr. Richard T. Eastwood

Interview with Dr. Richard T. Eastwood by Don Macon. An MDA-TV Production, Medical Communication. Produced for the University of Texas - Texas Medical Cent Historical Resources Project. Video Recorded 8/28/75. MDAH Master # 365-1-75. Runtime is 31:28 minutes.
(0:18) Don Macon introduces the program and Richard T. Eastwood, Executive Vice President and Director of Texas Medical Center, Inc.
(0:50) Eastwood offers some details of his biography, beginning on a farm in Nebraska.
(2:53) Eastwood describes his time working on the farm, including shucking corn. He cites his decision to go to college.
(6:20) Eastwood cites his attendance at Tarkio College in Missouri, where he finished 1936. He reports considering a law career, teaching high school business and history courses, and in 1938 deciding to go back to school. He recounts helping build tennis courts in the summer of 1934.
(8:52) He speaks of the University of Nebraska, where he got his master’s degree in 1939. He recounts further education and work at the University of Wisconsin and University of Alabama.
(11:38) He describes his activities during World War II, including a commission and brief time at Harvard.
(12:07) Eastwood speaks about meeting his wife, Elizabeth Comer [sp?], whom he married in 1942.
(12:45) Returning to the topic of the war, he describes a move to New Orleans, where he was in charge of a training program at Fleet Operational Training Command. He then applied for sea duty and went to the Pacific, including the Okinawa campaign.
(13:58) Eastwood describes the end of the war and his return to Alabama and Wisconsin. He speaks in more detail about his role at Alabama and the evolution of programs at Birmingham and the Medical Center.
(17:55) He begins discussing how he came to Houston. He was to visit TIRR and meet with Dr. William Spencer, and then attend the Alabama-Houston football game.
(18:45) Eastwood mentions how his name came up for the TMC position. Macon and Eastwood speak about Dr. Frederick Elliott, who was retiring in 1962. Eastwood speaks in more detail about his decision to take the TMC job.
(23:09) Macon talks about the TMC and the responsibilities of the job. Eastwood discusses projects underway and his vision for more centralized resources such as a computer facility.
(26:03) Eastwood discusses highlights of his tenure. He mentions specific instances of cooperation and centralization, such as the childcare facility, laundry, computer facility, residence halls, heating and cooling facility, library expansion, and changes to parking and traffic.
(29:51) Macon concludes the interview by thanking Eastwood for his efforts.

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Interview with Frederick C. Elliott, DDS, Part 1 of 5

Frederick C. Elliott, DDS, Interview, Part 1 of 5, U-matic Tape, Master. 1893-1932. Interviewed by Don Macon. Video tape recorded 7/19/1973. Approximately 30min. MDAH Master # 35-1-73. Produced for Texas Medical Center Historical Resources Project. Part 1 of this five part series introduces Dr. Fred Elliott and covers his early years in Pittsburg, Kansas. Son of a small town pharmacist, young Fred Elliott worked in his father's drug store while going to school. He set forth on his own at the age of 15 years, worked in drug stores in Oklahoma and Western Kansas, acquired his license in the dental profession and learned about the Kansas City Dental College. Dr. Elliott graduated from this school in 1918, immediately joined its faculty, and later combined dental practice with his teaching. Shortly after his marriage in 1928, Dr. Elliott joined the faculty of the University of Tennessee Dental College at Memphis. In 1932, Dr. Elliott accepted the Deanship of the Texas Dental College at Houston.

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Interview with Frederick C. Elliott, DDS, Part 2 of 5

Frederick C. Elliott, DDS, Interview, Part 2 of 5, U-matic Tape, Master. 1932-1943. Interviewed by Don Macon. Video recorded 7/23/1973. Produced for the Texas Medical Center Historical Resources Project. Part 2 of this series covers Dr. Elliott's activities from 1932, when he became Dean of the Texas Dental College, until 1943 when the school was brought into the University of Texas System as the Dental Branch in Houston. The Texas Dental College faced financial problems. The faculty was primarily composed of part time staff. Dr. Elliott went to work to improve teaching methods, recruit student and patients for the clinic. Dr. Elliott served on numerous health committees such as the Houston Board of Health and the Public health Commission of the Houston Chamber of Commerce. The image of the Texas Dental College changed from a place that only trained dentists to a health education and awareness institution. During these years Dr. Elliott met Col. William B. Bates who was Chairman of the School Board and Dr. E. W. Bertner who also served on the Houston Board of Health. Efforts to make the Texas Dental College a state school were revived in 1939. House Bill #278 was passed in 1943, and the University of Texas Dental Branch came into being on September 1st. of that year.

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Interview with Frederick C. Elliott, DDS, Part 3 of 5

Frederick C. Elliott, DDS, Interview, Part 3 of 5, U-matic Tape, Master. 1943-1953. Interviewed by Don Macon. Video Tape Recorded 7/25/1973. Approximately 30min. MDAH Master # 38-1-73. Produced for Texas Medical Center Historical Resources Project. Part 3 begins with a review of material that has gone before. Dr. Elliott discusses the study made by a committee appointed by the University of Texas Board of Regents to recommend locations of the Univeristy of Texas Health Units. He describes the planning and construction of a new building to house the Dental Branch at Houston. Dr. Elliott discusses this association during these years with Dr. E.W. Bertner, Col. William B. Bates, Mr. John Freeman and Dr. R. Lee Clark. He gives insight to the man, Dr. E. W. Bertner, and touches briefly on his tragic illness and death. In 1954 Dr. Elliott was asked to become Executive Director of the Texas Medical Center, Inc. Dr. Elliot tells of his decision to leave the dental school to head a busy medical center that was in the midst of active development.

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Interview with Frederick C. Elliott, DDS, Part 4 of 5

Frederick C. Elliott, DDS, Interview, Part 4 of 5, U-matic Tape, Master. 1953-1963. Interviewed by Don Macon. Video Tape Recorded 7/27/1973. Approximately 30min. MDAH Master # 38-2-1973. Produced for Texas Medical Center Historical Resources Project. Dr. Elliott discusses development of Texas Medical Center institutions. He also tells about ideas for institutions and programs that did not find support at an earlier date. Subsequently, however, some of these ideas have been implemented and operated successfully. Dr. Elliott, as a member of the committee for the Governor's Survey of Mental health Training and Research, assisted in developing programs for improvement in this field. Over the years, Dr. Elliott was gratified by recognition of his work from many quarters. Honors bestowed upon him included the 1960 Pierre Fauchard Award and designation as Dentist of the Century in commemoration of the Centennial of the American Dental Association. Dr. Elliott's recommendation in 1962 lead to the appointment of Dr. Richard Eastwood as Executive Director of the Texas medical Center, Inc. The following year Dr. Elliott retired.

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Interview with Frederick C. Elliott, DDS, Part 5 of 5

Frederick C. Elliott, DDS, Interview, Part 5 of 5, U-matic Tape, Master. 1963-1973. Interviewed by Don Macon. Video Recorded 7/31/1973. Produced for Texas Medical Center Historical Resources Project. Part 5, the last of the series, acquaints us with the man, Fred Elliott, his philosophy, his faith, his talents and the principles that haveguided his life. Describing retirement as "freedom from the impediments of salary," Dr. Elliott remains active as a Board Member of Texas Medical Center, Inc. and a Trustee of the Johnson Foundation. He pursues the personally fulfilling benefits of creative writing in his collection called "God's Promptings." He writes in the early morning hours to clear the brain before getting on with the business of the day. Fred Elliott, a gentle, creative man is also revealed as an inventor. Among his inventions: a Wafflewich to make dripless sandwiches, a Guardog to sound an alarm for prowlers, and an alarm to warn when air pressure in an auto tire is too low. Dr. Elliott's strong influence on those whose lives he touched is easily understood from this chapter of his life.

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Interview with Ella Fondren

Mrs. Ella Fondren. Interview by Don Macon. Mrs. Ella Fondren, born in 1880, talks about her early childhood in Kentucky, her move to Corsicana, Texas and later meeting and corresponding with Mr. Fondren for two years while he was working in the oil fields. She recalls Spindletop, the formation of the Humble Oil and Refining Co. and the establishment of the Fondren Foundation. She recounts her role in the establishment and growth of Methodist Hospital; she tells of her travels with Mrs. Josie Roberts, who was administrator of the hospital. TMC Historical Resources Project (MDAH #64-2-73). 18:15min. 10/25/1973

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Interview with John H. Freeman, Part 1 of 2

John H. Freeman, Part 1 of 2. Interviewed by Don Macon. Mr. Freeman, prominent attorney, member of the TMC Board of Directors, and Chairman of the Board of the MD Anderson Foundation, discusses his personal history from birth through receiving his law degree from the U of Chicago. He describes his professional career, his association with Dr. E. W. Bertner, the forming of the MD Anderson Foundation in 1939, the creation of a state cancer research hospital and early concepts of the Texas Medical Center. (Continued in Part 2). MDAH Master #39-2-73. 29:45min 8/2/1973

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Interview with John H. Freeman, Part 2 of 2

John H. Freeman, Part 2 of 2. Interviewed by Don Macon. Mr. Freeman continues the story of the state cancer hospital and the role of the Anderson Foundation in establishing it in Houston. He gives an account of the purchase of the land for the permanent site of the hospital and other institutions in the TMC; he discusses the philosophy underlying the MD Anderson Foundation's approach to assisting all of the various institutions. He looks at the future with an emphasis on preventative medicine. MDAH Master #41-1-73. 28min. 8/2/1973

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Interview with Frances Goff, Part 2 of 3

Frances Goff, Part 2 of 3. Interviewed by Don Macon. Ms. Goff recalls the years 1941 through 1954 in this segment of the interview. In 1941 she took the position of Personnel Director for the Texas Railroad Commission, but later that year she joined the Women's Army Corps. After the war she returned to Austin and resumed her activities as Budget Director fro the Senate Finance Committee. In 1951 she came to work for Dr. R. Lee Clark at Anderson; the first phase of the new hospital was completed in 1954. (Continued in Part 3). 6/7/1977. TMC Historical Resources Project (MDAH Master #746-1-77B) 34:30

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Interview with Frances Goff, Part 1 of 3

Frances Goff, Part 1 of 3. Interview by Don Macon. Ms. Goff, who has served as Director of Special Projects for MD Anderson Hospital since 1951, talks about her youth in Kenedy, Texas and her early interest in political matters. Some of her first positions included working in the legislative offices in Austin, acting as an aide to Governor O'Daniel and Budget Officer for the Senate Finance Committee. It was during these years in Austin that she cultivated a close association with members of the legislature. (Continued in Part 2). 6/7/1977. MDAH Master #746A-1-77. 31:00

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Interview with Frances Goff, Part 3 of 3

Frances Goff, Part 3 of 3. Interview by Don Macon. Ms. Goff tells of the many responsibilties she has had at MD Anderson Hospital; these range from the intricate planning detail through the many phases of expansion of the hospital to operational duties such as the phone system and the print shop. Having just celebrated her 25th year as Director of Bluebonnet Girls State, she recalls what a gratifying experience that has been. 6/7/1977. MDAH Master #746C-1-77. 40:00

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Interview with Earl C. Hankamer

Earl C. Hankamer. Interview by Don Macon. Mr. Hankamer, member of the boards of Baylor College of Medicine and TMC, Inc., reviews his early life in Turtle Bayou, now Hankamer, Texas. He recalls his business endeavors in the mercantile and oil business and tells how material success has enabled him to serve his fellow man. He played a principle role in bringing Baylor College of medicine to the Texas Medical Center. He tells of this historical move and speaks with pride of his family, his church and his involvement through the years with Baylor University. 9/19/1973. MDAH Master #41-2-73. 27:30

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Interview with William A. Kirkland

William A. Kirkland. Interview by Don Macon. A native Houstonian, Mr. Kirkland tells of his early years in Houston and his time at prep school before going to Princeton. He recalls early job hunting before deciding to enter the banking business. He tells about his family and his activities in both World Wars. Serving on the Houston School Board and the City Council, his interest in community affairs expanded with his appointment to the Board of Trustees of Rice Institute in 1946, and later to the Board of TMC, Inc. MDAH Master #47-1-73. 9/20/1973. 29:10

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Interview with Chauncey D. Leake, PhD.

Chauncey D. Leake, PhD. Interview by Don Macon. Former Executive Vice President and Dean of UTMB in Galveston, Dr. Leake began his administrative duties there in 1942, a time when the school was experiencing much turmoil. He led the institution out of this problem era and became active in health care endeavors on a state-wide basis. He worked closely with TMC pioneers such as Drs. Fred Elliott, Bill Bertner and Lee Clark and was instrumental in the early development of the TMC. MDAH #571-1-76. 5/14/1976. 58:10.

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Interview with A. Hamblin Letton, MD, FACS

“Video Profiles.” An Interview with A. Hamblin Letton, MD by N. Don Macon. An MDA-TV Presentation. Department of Medical Communication. Presented by The University of Texas System Cancer Center. M. D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute. MDAH #778-1-77. Video recorded 8/11/1977. Runtime is 26:34 minutes.
(0:20) Don Macon introduces the program and A. Hamblin Letton, a surgeon from Atlanta, Georgia, and the 1972 President of the American Cancer Society.
(1:10) Letton notes his presidency was dubbed “The Year of the Patient.”
(1:43) Letton offers some details of his biography, beginning in Florida. He was educated at and joined the faculty at Emory University. He discusses his children.
(2:38) He discusses his recent visit to China and the state of medical care there, including “barefoot doctors.”
(7:49) Letton describes the process for pursuing medical education in China.
(9:57) Letton speaks to the quality of medical care in China.
(12:20) He offers his observations on the general health of the population in China.
(14:34) Letton relays details of his 21-day trip to China. His group from the American Cancer Society was invited by China.
(17:35) He offers additional observations on Chinese society.
(18:32) He speaks about his perception of the mental health of China.
(19:35) Macon prompts Letton to consider lessons from China that might be applied in the U.S. Letton cites China’s success in getting healthcare to people in the countryside. They mention the Regional Medical Program. Letton cites his neighbor Willis Hurst, president of the American Heart Association. Letton brings up the ideas of pharmaceutical representatives or television networks playing a role in communicating health information.
(23:29) He returns to the topic of the organization of Chinese society.

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Interview with Maynard W. Martin, MD

Maynard W. Martin, MD. Interview by Don Macon. Although Dr. Martin's early interest was in Pediatrics, he entered a career in hospital administration. After serving in Cleveland, New York and St. Louis, He came to Houston in 1954 to head the joint administration program of St. Luke's and Texas Children's Hospital. He stayed there until his retirement in 1972. He spoke of the physical plants of the institutions, his methods of working through difficulties and some of the dynamic individuals he worked with such as Mr. Leopold Meyer and Dr. Denton Cooley. MDAH Master #71-2-74. 4/4/1974. 27:30

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Interview with Leopold L. Meyer

Leopold L. Meyer. Interview by Don Macon. Former President of the Board of Texas Children's Hospital, Mr. Meyer discusses his personal history and his roots in Galveston. He relates his merchandising and his contributions to retail credit methods. He talks about his work with carious civic organizations such as the Community Chest, Peace Officers Awards, Houston Council for Retarded Children, as well as his significant efforts directed toward Baylor, Methodist, St. Luke's and Texas Children's Hospitals. MDAH Master #69-1-73. 11/20/1973/ 37:10

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Interview with Dr. Gerald P. Murphy

Interview with Dr. Gerald P. Murphy by Don Macon. MDA-TV Production. Medical Communication. MDAH #647-1-76. 9/30/1976. Runtime is 27:38 minutes.
(0:17) Don Macon introduces the program and Gerald P. Murphy, MD, Director of Roswell Park Memorial Institute, Buffalo, New York. Murphy is also a member of the Committee for International Collaborative Activities of the Internal Union Against Cancer.
(1:05) Murphy offers details of his biography. He was born in Montana, grew up in the Pacific Northwest, studied at Johns Hopkins, and served in the Army at Walter Reid. He joined Roswell Park in 1968.
(2:41) He discusses his influences, his specialty in urology, and his interest in cancer care.
(4:42) Murphy recounts joining Roswell Park Memorial Institute and becoming director. He describes the Institute and its history.
(8:35) He reflects on the team approach to cancer care as well as the importance of leadership and programs.
(10:31) Murphy speaks about the national cancer program. He mentions the passage of the National Cancer Act of 1971 and its renewal in 1973. He addresses research and clinical work.
(14:02) He discusses milestones, highlighting the translation of research to clinical investigation. He cities the speed of communications, new developments in monitoring, findings in cell biology, the development of a national cancer control program.
(17:58) Murphy offers his definition of “cancer control.”
(20:41) He discusses community involvement and volunteer organizations. He speaks to the prevalence of fear of cancer.
(26:15) Macon brings the interview to a close and thanks Murphy.

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Interview with Julia Williams Bertner Naylor

Julia Williams Bertner Naylor. Interview by Don Macon. Mrs. Naylor discusses elements of her personal history, her marriage to Dr. E. W. Bertner in 1922, their home at the Rice Hotel for 28 years and their leisure homes at Lake Jackson and the farm near Hempstead. She talks about Dr. Bertner's background, his family history, his education, and his close association with members of the MD Anderson Foundation and others instrumental in the founding and development of the Texas Medical Center. MDAH Master #60-1-73. 10/4/1973. 32:00

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Interview with Gregory O'Conor, MD

Interview with Gregory O'Conor, MD by Don Macon. MDA-TV Production. Medical Communication. MDAH Master #649-1-76. 10/1/1976. Runtime is 3:33 minutes.
(0:13) Don Macon introduces the “Video Profiles” program and Gregory T. O'Conor, MD, Associate Director for International Affairs, National Cancer Institute. Along with other members of the Committee for International Collaborative Activities of the Internal Union Against Cancer, O’Conor was visiting M. D. Anderson Hospital on the occasion of its rededication and expansion.
(0:43) O’Conor reflects on his decision to become a doctor. He went to medical school at Cornell. He started out in obstetrics and gynecology, but switched to pathology.
(2:54) He describes his decision to leave a job in laboratory medicine and go to work in Uganda at the University of East Africa around 1960. Murphy reports working with Dr. Denis Burkitt.
(6:35) O’Conor speaks to differences in patterns of cancer, geographic pathology, and environmental factors in Africa.
(9:04) He reflects on the influence of his time in Africa on his interest in cancer. He recounts working in the medical school with students, doing research, and deciding to continue in academic medicine.
(10:12) O’Conor describes his work at the National Cancer Institute.
(11:18) O’Conor describes his work with the World Health Organization. He speaks about the WHO’s International Agency for Research on Cancer, which began operations in 1966. The National Cancer Institute sent him to participate in Switzerland and later France.
(15:24) He recounts his acquaintances with other international figures in cancer research like Pierre Denoix and John Higginson. He talks about his work in epidemiology and geographic pathology.
(17:03) O’Conor speaks about the Committee for International Collaborative Activities of the Internal Union Against Cancer.
(19:39) He describes the development of the International Cancer Research Databank. He notes the creation of databases that have pulled together published cancer literature, abstracts of ongoing research projects, abstracts of clinical research treatment protocols, and a forthcoming database of bibliographies in special subjects related to cancer. Citing MEDLINE, he deems their system CancerLine. He describes the online connectivity of the databases.
(24:50) O’Conor notes that much of the published literature in the databases, including from Europe, is in English. He says articles in French or German still tend to have English abstracts. For the databases, French and German literature is being abstracted in those languages. The Japanese and Russian literature relies on English abstracts.
(26:45) Asked about the fight against cancer, he cites “steady progress.” He elaborates on the state of cancer research and control.
(29:50) Macon brings the interview to a close and thanks O’Conor.

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Interview with Stanley W. Olson, MD

Stanely W. Olson, MD. Interview by Don Macon. Dr. Olson, Dean of Baylor College of Medicine from 1953-1966, discusses his personal history as well as his educational and professional background with the Mayo Foundation. He also served as Dean of the University of Illinois College of Medicine and Medical Director of the University of Illinois Research and Educational Hospital. He recalls coming to Houston as the new Dean of Baylor and gives his perspective for the future of the Texas Medical Center. MDAH Master #681-1-73. 11/9/1973. 32:00

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Interview with Carmen Annes Dias Prudente

An interview with Mrs. Carmen Annes Dias Prudente by Don Macon. MDAH Master #743-1-77. 6/3/1977. Runtime is 25:18 minutes.
(0:09) Don Macon introduces the “Video Profiles” program and Mrs. Carmen Annes Dias Prudente from the Foundation Antonio Prudente in Brazil.
(1:50) Prudente discusses her family history, meeting her husband, Dr. Antonio Prudente, and efforts against cancer in Sao Paulo, Brazil. After her husband’s death, the association they established was named the Foundation Antonio Prudente. She is in charge of the volunteers there.
(5:30) She elaborates on grants and fundraising efforts to support their movement. She discusses the hospital, its operations, and its clientele. She stresses the large percentage of poor patients seen by the hospital and the quality of care across all populations.
(9:06) Prudente speaks about the training requirements for volunteers.
(11:43) She speaks about Sao Paulo’s pollution, population, geography, and climate.
(14:55) Prudente reports the hospital has 324 beds and 186 volunteers. She describes their pink uniform with a rosebud symbolizing hope. She describes her philosophy for volunteers—always showing hope.
(17:21) She adds that her volunteers are mostly women, but some men are involved in the religious department, and children are involved in fundraising. She discusses volunteer activities and recruitment.
(20:35) She tells the story of a young boy who came to visit the hospital.
(24:04) Macon concludes the interview.

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Interview with Josie M. Roberts

Josie M. Roberts. Interview by Don Macon. Mrs. Roberts discusses her many years as administrator of Methodist Hospital, beginning in 1925. She gives a history of the hospital from its original location on San Jacinto & Rosalie through its move to the TMC and its growth after the initial building was completed. She discusses the hospital's affiliation with Baylor College of Medicine. She recalls her close association with Mr. & Mrs. W. W. Fondren, Mr. Ted Bowen and others significant in Methodist Hospital's growth. MDAH Master #93-1-74. 3/29/1974. 28:00

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Interview with Richard S. Ruiz, MD

A Conversation with Richard S. Ruiz, MD. with N. Don Macon. Produced by UT/TV Houston, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. Copyright 1911. 1/22/1991. Runtime is 29:52 minutes.
(0:33) Don Macon introduces the program as part of a series on the history of the Texas Medical Center. He introduces the interviewee, Dr. Richard Ruiz, Director of the Hermann Eye Center and Professor and Chairman of Ophthalmology at The University of Texas Medical School. He notes that Dr. Ruiz is a native Houstonian, whose father had also been a physician in Houston. Dr. Ruiz shares some details of his upbringing and education.
(1:53) Ruiz elaborates on his decision to become a doctor and his experience at the UT Medical Branch in Galveston, where he graduated in 1957. He recounts faculty members who were there at the time, like Chauncey Leake, Truman Blocker, and Raymond Gregory.
(3:48) He discusses his selection of a specialty. He had been interested being an internist and spent time at Mylie Durham’s family practice. He decided on a surgical specialty, started his internship at Hermann, and eventually chose to focus on the eye.
(4:59) Ruiz discusses physicians at Hermann at the time of his internship, including Director Leigh Crozier.
(6:22) He elaborates on his selection of ophthalmology as a specialty. He cites the influence of several physicians. He speaks about the current state of getting into ophthalmology programs.
(8:27) Ruiz speaks about his next steps: interning at Hermann, going to Wayne State University in Detroit, completing a retina fellowship at Harvard, and then returning to Houston.
(8:47) He discusses moving into the Herman Professional Building and setting up his practice in Houston. He speaks further about his involvement at Hermann, including in the Residency Training Program. He mentions work at St. Joseph’s, Jefferson Davis/Ben Taub, Baylor College of Medicine, and in Galveston.
(11:26) Ruiz describes an opportunity he had to lead the Ophthalmology Department in Galveston. He reports declining the chance, citing his deep investment and involvement in Houston.
(12:24) He discusses getting involved at M. D. Anderson. He was asked to be Chief of Ophthalmology at Hermann in 1967. He speaks more about forming a group, naming Charlie Russo, Malcom Mazow, Bob Stewart, and Bob Wilkins.
(14:34) From there he relates the development of the Hermann Eye Center. He stresses the role of technology. He also speaks to the politics of its creation and relationship to the medical school. He cites the support of various foundations in raising funds.
(19:40) Ruiz further describes the structure and operations of the Hermann Eye Center. He speaks about the Houston Eye Associates.
(22:15) He speaks to the Eye Center’s service to Hermann Hospital. He highlights the Hermann Eye Fund and how the Center handles indigent patients.
(23:34) He discusses Truman Blocker’s time in Houston and his support for the Eye Center.
(27:14) Ruiz discusses his children and their careers.
(28:32) Macon concludes the interview congratulating Ruiz for his accomplishments.

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Interview with Robert A. Shepherd

Mr. Robert A. Shepherd. interviewed by Don Macon. 2/12/1974. 57min. MDAH Master #84-1-74. Mr. Shepherd, long time attorney with Vinson & Elkins, joined the board of Methodist Hospital in 1943, and served as their legal counsel for many years. Mr. Shepherd discussed his personal family history as residents of Huntsville and later Colorado City, Texas where he was acquainted with the Gus Bertner family and a friend of Bill Bertner. He spoke of his entrance into law school at the Universty of Texas, his military service which interrupted his education, and his studies after the war in the law office of his father, Judge James L. Shepherd. He noted that he was sworn in to the bar on his 27th birthday, 7/7/1921. He gives a history of the Methodist Hospital as well as of the Texas Medical Center. He tells of his roles as board member of Methodist and as their legal representative.

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Interview with Carroll D. Simmons

Carroll D. Simmons. Interviewed by Don Macon. 30:30, 3/1/1974. MDAH Master #89-1-74. Former Vice Chancellor for Business Affairs of the University of Texas System in Austin, Mr. Simmons traces his long career. He tells of his move to Houston to become trust officer in the First National Bank, where he worked with the MD Anderson Hospital account; he recalls the planning of the institution and his roles as secretary of the MD Anderson Foundation and the assistant secretary-treasurer of the Texas Medical Center, Inc.

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Interview with Walter G. Sterling

Walter G. Sterling. Interview by Don Macon. Mr. Sterling, a native of Chambers County, is current Chairman of the Board of Hermann Hospital Estate and has served on that board since 1950. He recalls his personal and family history and talks in some detail about the background and activities of his father, Ross S. Sterling. He discusses his role in the history of the Hermann Hospital Estate, the Hermann Hospital, the Texas Medical Center and the establishment of the UT Medical School at Houston. 28:45. 12/4/1973

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Interview with Jack R. Winston, DDS

Jack R. Winston, DDS. Interview by Gene Allen. A practicing dentist in Houston for 50 years, Dr. Winston has served in a leadership capacity in many dental societies through the years - on local, state, national and international levels. He describes his humble beginnings in Tyler, Texas, the encouragement he received from his parents to pursue an education and the struggle of starting a practice during the depression. He recalls his dynamic career, his great interest in education, nutrition and his pioneering efforts in cosmetic dentistry. 41:00 2/10/1982.

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Interview with Dr. David A. Wood

Dr. David A. Wood. Interviewed by Don Macon. Video recorded 9/25/1975. Approx. 30min. Color-Sound. MDAH Master #401-1-75. Produced for The University of Texas - Texas Medical Center Historical Resources Project. Dr. Wood briefly discussed his early history from his birth near the River of Lost Souls, in New Mexico through events that led to his interest n Pathology. He spoke of his wife who is a RN and his five children, one of whom is a MD, another who is interested in academic medicine. Sketching his career, Dr. Woods provided information about the American Cancer Society. He also talked about Dr. E. W. Bertner, Dr. R. Lee Clark, Dr. Murray Copeland, Dr. Grant Taylor, and Senator Frank Church. Dr. Wood emphasizes that the cancer story is a message of hope.

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Texas Medical Center "Visions" U-matic (3/4”)

This ¾” U-Matic tape contains a 1985 program about the Texas Medical Center. The cassette case is labeled "Visions," while the program concludes with the words, “Visions Fulfilled….” It was produced by UT-TV Houston, Executive Director N. Don Macon, Production Supervisor Greg West, Producer/Writer Carla Diebold, Photographer/Editor Daniel Blust, Copyright 1985 Texas Medical Center. The recording runs 8:12, although the content stops around the 7:31 mark.
(0:03) Introductory sequence featuring a montage of TMC images.
(0:28) Narration begins introducing the TMC.
(0:50) The program features historical images and recounts the genesis of the Texas Medical Center. The narrator tells of Monroe Anderson’s fortune and the vision of trustees John Freeman, Horace Wilkins, and William Bates for a Medical Center.
(1:23) Interview with John Freeman, who discusses the acquisitions of land, establishment of institutions, and granting of funds.
(1:38) Discussions of financial support from Houston and elsewhere.
(2:14) November 1, 1945 TMC chartered.
(2:38) Historical images give way to contemporary images as the narration continues. The video prominently features images of buildings, facilities, and technology.
(3:05) The TMC includes 33 institutions. There is a focus on technology and medical advances, highlighting areas like immunology and curing cancer.
(4:32) The program highlights heart surgeries, research, and new techniques.
(5:00) Showing images of children, patients, and technology, the program looks towards the future. The narrator highlights further advances, patient education, and technology and communication.
(6:13) The program concludes by returning the interview with John Freeman.

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The Texas Medical Center. Narrated by Don Macon, Produced/Directed by Raymond O’Leary, U-matic (3/4”)

This ¾” U-Matic tape contains a program titled “The Texas Medical Center” from approximately 1972. It begins with an overview of the TMC and its history. The bulk of the program is dedicated to a video tour of the TMC, offering brief characterizations of many of its hospitals and educational institutions.
The credits read: “The Texas Medical Center. This film was made possible through the cooperation of the administrators and staff of all institutions in the Texas Medical Center. Production coordinated by Texas Medical Center, Inc. with the full support and cooperation of the Council of Directors and Administrators. These people made special contributions of their technical skills: Manfred Gygli, William R. Pittman, Gloria J. Heard, Herbert R. Smith, Mario Paoloski, Ken Wiedower, Joachim Zwer. Narrated by Don Macon. Produced and Directed by Raymond O’Leary.” The video runs 29:24.
(0:01) The introduction to this program frames the Texas Medical Center as a city, explaining the variety of facilities and services there. The visuals include a mixture of images of buildings and people.
(1:18) The video tells of the origins of the TMC, going back to the trustees of the M. D. Anderson Foundation in 1941. The narrator recounts the acquisition of a 134-acre tract of land from the City of Houston. He introduces the Texas Medical Center, Inc., which he says is responsible for development and coordination across the TMC. He names the TMC leaders Dr. E. W. Bertner, Dr. Frederick Elliott, and Dr. Richard T. Eastwood. He relates that that TMC was designed to attract institutions dedicated to health ed, research, patient care and service.
(3:07) The program offers an overview of the buildings and institutions of the TMC. Hermann Hospital and its Nurses Residence predate the TMC, having been established in 1925. Baylor College of Medicine began construction in 1946. Soon came the Methodist Hospital, Shriner’s Hospital for Crippled Children, the Houston Academy of Medicine’s Jones Library Building, Texas Children’s Hospital, St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital, The University of Texas in Houston’s M. D. Anderson Cancer Hospital and Tumor Institute, and the University of Texas Dental Branch. By 1963, new buildings included the Texas Institute for Rehabilitation and Research, the Houston Speech and Hearing Center, the Texas Research Institute for Mental Sciences, Texas Women’s University College of Nursing, the Institute of Religion and Human Development, and Ben Taub General Hospital. There were also expansions and new buildings for existing institutions.
(5:38) The program changes its focus to people in the TMC He narrators explains over 3,000 people receive care daily. In 1970, 105,000 people “lived” there, at least for a while. There were approximately 950,000 patient visits in 1970. He highlights the growth of specialized services. Approximately 15,000 people work in the TMC, and there are 3,700 volunteers.
(7:06) Ben Taub General Hospital. The video cuts to an ambulance followed by an Emergency Room scene at Ben Taub General Hospital, which is a 435-bed hospital in the Harris County Hospital District.
(8:11) City of Houston Department of Public Health. The program presents the City of Houston Department of Public Health, which offers environmental and special health services for the prevention, early detection, and treatment of disease.
(8:43) Hermann Hospital. The program notes Hermann Hospital’s community contributions. The narrator describes the modernized hospital and its affiliation with the University of Texas as a teaching hospital.
(9:15) Methodist Hospital. The program highlights Methodist’s worldwide reputation. The narrator cites its high goals in medical education, research, patient care, and advanced techniques. He mentions its strengths in internal medicine, cardiovascular surgery, neurological surgery, orthopedic surgery, and organ transplantation.
(9:53) St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital. Cutting to a video of a birth and then showing the premature nursery, the program features St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital. The narrator mentions other specialized facilities, such as coronary and intensive care units, a heart catheterization laboratory, a urodynamics lab, and a heart transplant unit.
(10:45) Texas Children’s Hospital. The program describes the 174-bed pediatric hospital connected to St. Luke’s and touts it hematology research laboratory.
(11:03) Texas Heart Institute. Showing a video of heart surgery, the program discusses the Texas Heart Institute.
(11:20) Shriner’s Hospital for Crippled Children. The program shows scenes of rehabilitation, including in a pool, at Shriner’s Hospital for Crippled Children.
(11:58) Houston Speech and Hearing Center. The program describes Houston Speech and Hearing Center’s programs testing, training, and treating patients, as well as teaching professionals. The narrator highlights its New Institute for Research in Human Communication and its Disorders.
(12:35) Texas Institute for Rehabilitation and Research. The program tells of the comprehensive rehabilitation care provided by the Texas Institute for Rehabilitation and Research. The narrator tells of the medical, psychological, and social care and support there.
(13:16) Texas Research Institute Mental Sciences. The program describes the Texas Research Institute for Mental Sciences’ research to solve “the problems of the mind.” It tells of research into drug abuse and the development of therapies to alleviate pain and suffering.
(14:02) M. D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute. The program features the M. D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute. It highlights the germ-free environments of Life Island and the Laminar air flow room.
(14:47) UT System in Houston health sciences education. The narrator notes the M. A. Anderson Hospital offers clinical residency programs, as well as pre- and post-doctoral fellowships in basic sciences.
(15:13) University of Texas in Houston School of Public Health. The program reports that the new School of Public Health mixes research plus community outreach.
(15:46) University of Texas Dental Branch. The program emphasizes the University of Texas Dental Branch’s new teaching methods, including the use of television. The narrator highlights laboratories and a 400-seat auditorium. The Postgraduate School of Dentistry offers continuing professional education. The School also offers graduate programs and advanced courses in cooperation with the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences. The Dental Science Institute is its research arm.
(16:50) The narrator notes the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences offers life sciences courses to engineers, scientist, technicians, doctors, and nurses. The Division of Continuing Education allows practicing physicians to obtain new medical knowledge through courses with specialists.
(17:14) University of Texas Medical School. The program introduces the University of Texas’s new Medical School in Houston, noting Hermann Hospital’s status as a primary teaching unit. The video shows images of the proposed Medical School facility, not yet completed. The narrator reports it will have 800 students once it reaches capacity. The program highlights the medical community television system, designed for sharing learning resources, with cables connected across the 22 TMC institutions through the Jones Library.
(18:14) Baylor College of Medicine. The program notes that Baylor College of Medicine is one of the top medical schools in the country. It reports Baylor’s research activities range from elemental analysis of biological compounds to the development of artificial heart components. Baylor’s research areas include lipids, virology, epidemiology, cardiovascular disease, and more. Baylor’s affiliates and teaching hospitals include Methodist Hospital, Ben Taub General Hospital, St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital, Texas Children’s Hospital, the Veteran’s Administration Hospital, Texas Institute Rehabilitation and Research, Texas Research Institute for Mental Sciences.
(19:32) Texas Woman’s University College of Nursing. The narrator relates that TWU offers both BS and MS degrees. He adds the Schools of Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy have undergraduate and master’s programs. The program highlights the new facilities, with an enrollment planned to grow to 500.
(20:26) Institute of Religion and Human Development. The program reports that Institute of Religion and Human Development carries out graduate education and research in ministerial service, marriage and family counseling, and post-doctoral interdisciplinary ethical studies. It adds, the Institute’s education and training balance theology and science. The program shows images of the dedication of Rothko chapel, including views of the Broken Obelisk, reflecting pool and Chapel.
(21:21) Child Care Center. The narrator explains the Child Care Center opened in April 1968 and serves seven participating hospitals, accepting children aged three months to seven years, seven days a week.
(21:58) Harris County Medical Society. As library images are onscreen, the narrator says the Harris County Medical Society created the Houston Academy of Medicine to start a medical library in 1915. The HAM-TMC Library serves all TMC institutions plus the entire Houston academic and medical community, as well as Texas and the region. He adds the University of Texas Dental Branch and M. D. Anderson Hospital also have libraries. The Library participates in MEDLARS , which provides automatic storage and retrieval of information. The TMC Common Computer and Research Facility offers computer support for TMC scientists and academic community.
(23:29) The program reflects on the growth and changes of the TMC and looks to future. It highlights new planned facilities: the TMC Bertner Street Garage, the University of Texas Medical School, the University of Texas School of Public Health, the M. D. Anderson Outpatient Clinic and Lutheran Hospital, and the Hermann Hospital Emergency Room Facility. The narrator highlights the expansion of programs to train and educate, as well as the expansion and improvement of inpatient, outpatient, and ambulatory care facilities. He calls attention to the TMC’s ongoing emphasis on cancer, heart disease, organ transplantation, mental health, virology, pharmacology, lipid research, and rehabilitation.
(26:33) The program highlights applied research in improving the delivery of health care. In doing so it points out Baylor College of Medicine and its Institute for Health Services Research, the Xerox Center, and its Community Medicine Department.
(27:01) The program describes a future focus on increasing the accessibility of high-standard health services. The narrator touts a goal of closer relationships with other hospitals and community clinics, as the program shows images of Center Pavilion Hospital, Riverside General Hospital, the St. Anthony Center, and TIRR Priester Rehabilitation Unit. The discussion moves to the prevention of sickness and injury by preserving a healthy environment and educate individuals. The narrator mentions the City of Houston Department of Public Health, University of Texas School of Public Health, and Harris County Hospital District.
(28:16) The program closes by touting the “Comprehensive medical complex which has established Goals of excellence in medical education, biomedical research, patient care and health services to the community of the nation."

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Texas Medical Center records

  • IC 002
  • Colección
  • 1907-2019

The Texas Medical Center records include TMC charter material, correspondence, committee minutes, interviews and transcripts, photographs and slides, budgetary information, newspapers and clippings, research material for books, surveys, materials related to TMC events and visitors, films and audiocassettes, brochures, architectural renderings, guidebooks and directories, and maps. The materials date from the 1900s to the present. The collection also includes the papers of Mary Schiflett who held leadership positions in the TMC from 1970-2009. The collection has been processed at box and folder level. The material is generally in good condition and consists of 39 cubic feet totaling 93 boxes.

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Texas Medical Center Historical Resources Project records

  • IC 084
  • Colección
  • 1973-1991

The Texas Medical Center (TMC) Historical Resources Project records contain video oral histories of notable personalities associated with the TMC. The initial group of interviews focuses on individuals involved in the founding or early days of the TMC. Later “video profiles” also include significant visitors to the TMC. Several of these feature national and international figures in cancer research on their visits to Houston. In total the collection features thirty-eight individuals.

Don Macon, Director of the TMC Historical Resources Project, serves as interviewer in all but one of the recordings. They are all staged as one-on-one conversations, with the exception of his interview of Isaac Berenblum and Philippe Shubik. A typical interview begins with some biographical information about the interviewee, followed by accounts of their involvement with the Texas Medical Center. They each tend to be approximately 30-60 minutes long; the shortest interview is about 18 minutes, with the longest being 2 hours and 18 minutes.

The bulk of the interviews took place from 1973-1978. There are also interviews from 1982, 1988, and 1991. Most if not all of the interviews were recorded in the studio at M. D. Anderson Cancer Center.

The conversations with thirty-eight different interviewees are spread across nearly one hundred tapes. Some interviews are divided into multiple segments, while many tapes are duplications.

This videotapes are primarily 3/4" U-Matic with some VHS. There are many original master recordings, as well as duplicates on a variety of media--including a dozen interviews transferred to DVDs. Transcripts have been created for some of the interviews.

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Ernst William Bertner, MD papers

  • MS 002
  • Colección
  • 1908-1978

The Ernst W. Bertner, MD papers (MS002) is 6.5 cubic feet and consists of seven documents boxes and two oversize boxes. It contains biographical information, personal and professional correspondence, speeches, certificates, official appointments, newsclippings, scrapbooks, photographs, audiovisual materials, and realia that detail the personal life, professional activities, and leadership of Dr. Ernst W. Bertner in Houston and the Texas Medical Center. The materials are in good condition.

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William B. Bates papers

  • MS 011
  • Colección
  • 1896-1981

The William B. Bates papers contains correspondence and photographs documenting his life and career as a lawyer. Of particular interest are the scrapbook of newspaper clippings dating back to the 1920s and photographs from World War I and Bates' childhood. The collection consists of 14 boxes, including two oversize boxes, and equals 9 cubic feet. The materials are in fair to good condition.

Subjects: Attorney

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Murray M. Copeland, PhD papers

  • MS 114
  • Colección
  • 1902-1982

The Murray M. Copeland papers contains reprints, illustrations, interview by Don Macon transcription, Roswell Park Memorial Institute memorial display, biographical information, publications, and Johns Hopkins background. Collection consists of 2 boxes totaling 1 cubic feet of reprints and other printed materials.

Subjects: Oncology.

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William Kellar interview collection

  • MS 228
  • Colección
  • 1987-2002

The William Kellar interview collection consists of interview transcripts related to his research on the History of the Texas Medical Center. Interviews were conducted by Louis Marchiafava, PhD, N. Don Macon, and William Kellar. They were a product of various projects in the Texas Medical Center: Hermann Eye Center Historical Project, Texas Medical Center Oral History Project, Oral History of MD Anderson Foundation, Elliott Manuscript Project. The collection consists of 2 boxes equaling 1 cubic foot. Materials are in good condition.

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