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Archival description
Awa, Akio. Nagasaki, Japan
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Howard B. Hamilton, MD papers

  • MS 066
  • Collection
  • 1945-1997

The Howard B. Hamilton, MD, papers, MS 066, includes material from 1945-1997 related to the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) and the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF). Hamilton was the Chief of Clinical Laboratories for the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission from 1956 until its dissolution in 1975. He served in the same capacity for the Radiation Effects Research Foundation, which succeeded the ABCC, until 1984. This collection encompasses this period of time in Dr. Hamilton's career, as well as his related scholarly work after his retirement from RERF. Dr. Hamilton donated his collection of letters, reprints, newspaper articles, photographs, memos, and ephemera to the John P. McGovern Historical Collections and Research Center between 1985 and 2002. The collection is in good condition and consists of 3.75 cubic feet (8 boxes).

This collection contains eight series: I. Correspondence; II. Memorandum, Notes, Books; III. Conferences, Congresses, Manuscripts; IV. Reprints; V. Newspaper Articles; VI. Akio Awa Cartoons; VII. Additional Correspondence; VIII. Addendum Series. This collection contains many reprints of articles Hamilton wrote or co-wrote on topics including the structure and function of hemoglobin, biochemical genetics, and the long term after-effects of exposure to ionizing radiation. One highlight of the collection is a series of cartoons, Series VI, created by Hamilton's friend Dr. Akio Awa that gives a unique look into the daily goings-on of the ABCC and RERF. Another collection highlight is the photographs in the Addendum Series, Series VIII, which includes images of former United States Senator Ted Kennedy who visited RERF in the late 1970s. Photos also include group photos from many ABCC and RERF conferences and events.

This collection was donated to the Historical Research Center over a number of years, and the material was processed at different times by different people, which resulted in several different organizational schemes being used. During the most recent processing of the collection the arrangement of the material was left unchanged to maintain continuity and for the sake of scholarly citations that may have been made previously

Hamilton was born in Oak Park Illinois on December 4, 1918. He graduated from the University of Rochester in New York in 1941 and from Yale University School of Medicine in 1945. Hamilton served in the United States Navy from 1942-1945, during World War II. In the late 1940s and early 1950s Hamilton conducted research at Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard University, the Long Island School of Medicine, the New York College of Surgeons, and the University of Tokyo in Japan.

In 1956 Hamilton moved to Hiroshima, Japan, where he lived for the next thirty years. After his move to Japan, Hamilton served as the Chief of Clinical Laboratories for the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) from 1956 until its dissolution in 1975. Hamilton worked in the same capacity for the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF), which succeeded the ABCC, until 1984. Between 1984 and 1986 Dr. Hamilton began transitioning into retirement; he continued to work as a consultant for the RERF during this time.

Hamilton was a consummate scholar and published extensively thoughout his career. Hamilton published papers on topics including endocrinology, steroid chemistry, enzyme kinetics, hemoglobinopathies, the structure and function of hemoglobin, genetic polymorphisms, biochemical genetics, the long term after-effects of exposure to ionizing radiation, and epidemiology of cardio-vascular disease.

Hamilton's hobbies included playing tennis and practicing the Japanese theatrical art of Noh, which features dramatic masks and carefully defined movements. After his retirement, Dr. Hamilton catalogued Noh and Kabuki works and published Noh plays. In some circles, Dr. Hamilton was known as much for his enthusiastic patronage and participation in Noh as he was for his work with the ABCC and RERF. (Source: Washington Post, May 9, 2007)

Hamilton died on May 9, 2007 at his home in Falls Church, Virginia. He was 88 years old.

The collection is in good to excellent condition depending on the age of the individual item and how carefully it was stored and preserved in the years before it entered the HRC's collection. Dr. Hamilton donated his large collection of letters, reprints, newspaper articles, photographs, memos, and ephemera to the John P. McGovern Historical Collections and Research Center between about 1985 and 2002. The collection consists of 3.75 cubic feet (8 boxes) and is collection MS 066.

Hamilton, Howard B.

William J. Schull, PhD papers

  • MS 067
  • Collection
  • 1945-2014

MS 67 the William J. Schull papers contains correspondence, interoffice memorandums, presentations, scientific works, journal reprints, monograph drafts, report drafts, travel diaries, travel receipts and itineraries, travel ephemera, other printed material, news clips, exhlbit material, photographs, 35 mm slides, audios tapes, video tapes, film, maps and realia in eighty-six cubic feet of material documenting his the life and works. Over 60 percent of the collection documents his life and work at the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) and Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) in Japan. Twenty five percent of the collection contains papers from his work for various governmental and non-governmental bodies about the effects of ionizing radiation. Another 8 cubic feet contains lbs from his personal life. Dr. Schull created travel diaries about the many international trips required for his work. The collection contains 62 typewritten travel diaries as well as many lbs of travel ephemera, mainly from Japan, collected by Dr. Schull. Dr. Schull wrote several books and the collection contains copies of the historical documents and photographs used in the creation of his books, notably "Song Among The Ruins," his memoir about his time at the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission. The major theme of this collection is epidemiological and genetic scientific innovation used to quantify the threat posed to the human race by ionizing radiation; to establish the probability of health outcomes to alleviate the fear of survivors, especially about the health of unborn generations; and to provide governments with facts about the consequences of the use of atomic weapons for war and nuclear energy for industrial purposes.

In addition to the records for ABCC and RERF (1945-2014), organizations with a large number of records in the collection include: ICRP, International Commission On Radiological Protection (1980-1995); ICRHER, International Consortium For Research On The Effects of Radiation (1990-2002); UNSCEAR, United Nations, Scientific Committee On The Effects Of Atomic Radiation (1987); WHO, United Nations World Health Organization, Health Effects of Chernobyl Accident (1990s); United States Department of Energy, Advisory Council On Nuclear Facility Safety (1990); United States Environmental Protection Agency, Science Advisory Board, Radiation Advisory Committee (1984-1990); and BRER, United States National Academy of Sciences, National Research Council, Board On Radiation Effects Research (1990s).

While the material is generally in good condition, some of the material suffered flood damage during tropical storm Allison in 2001. Although archivists discarded several lbs that could not be salvaged, they did preserve some material that may have value although flood damage is evident. With the damaged papers, some pages may be stuck together and handwritten notes may be faded beyond recognition. This damaged material is limited to four folders in two boxes, including box 40 folder 1; and box 42, folders 1, 2 and 3.

Dr. Schull collected and preserved all of the material in this collection in the course of his professional career and private life from 1945 to 2014. The collection consists of approximately 135 boxes including oversize and audiovisual. It consists of approximately 86 cubic feet of material.

Schull, William Jackson