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Reel #3. Side #1. Recording of a meeting

This sound recording comes from Side 1 of a 5" Audio Reel-to-Reel labeled "Reel #3." It is dated 10/24/68 and 10/28/68. It records the meeting(s) of an unidentified organization. The agenda items focus on the approval and administration of medical programs with a focus on the Houston area. The recordings feature the introduction of proposals/items, debate, amendments, and voting.

(0:40) Proposal 5 "Reduce complications from radiotherapy." A speaker notes the dollar amount for the program had increased since Steering had previously considered the item. He explains that the purpose is to inform facilities in Texas of the results of study carried out by UT Dental Branch and M. D. Anderson Hospital. The program supports dentist involvement, and also aims to inform and assist other regions in establishing such programs. He highlights new information just reported at a joint meeting of American Dental Association and the American Cancer Society in June. There is a recommendation to approve, but also acknowledgement of some concern that Baylor School of Dentistry wasn't involved. However, the speaker notes Dr. Randolph at Baylor was aware and will support the proposal. The group debates the need for written endorsement by entities including Baylor College of Medicine Dental School, the Texas Dental Association, and Dr. Robert Walker, who is in charge of the dental program at [unspecified] Medical School. There is a move to approve the proposal subject to receiving requested documentation, followed by a vote in favor.

(18:42) Proposal 6 “Houston neighborhood health services program.” A speaker explains this is a proposal from Baylor University College of Medicine. Originally it had included attachments from San Antonio and Galveston, but those had since been withdrawn. Steering approved the project in principle, while noting the need to establish the role of Southwestern. The proposal concerns “comprehensive neighborhood health centers.” However, one speaker criticizes it for not being comprehensive and having key omissions. (23:09) Another speaker criticizes the motion as yet another survey, proposal, or grant for a particular area, noting the “negro communities" under consideration "have been surveyed, restudied, resurveyed...everybody knows where the poor folks are. Everybody know who needs [...] healthcare. Everybody knows the death rate is higher over there. Everybody here knows that my life expectancy is seven years shorter than yours. Everybody knows that the infant mortality rate in our community is five, anywhere from three to five times higher. You drop lower first year, then it goes up to ten times. I don’t see that we need to spend any more money on this type of proposal." There is a suggestion of taking time to consider ironing out local problems and then returning the item to the steering committee. The recording concludes by recounting an earlier proposal for additional clinics in the Hospital District.

Sans titre

Reel #3. Side #2. Recording of a meeting

This sound recording comes from Side 2 of a 5" Audio Reel-to-Reel labeled "Reel #3." It is dated 10/28/68 and appears to be a continuation of the same meeting taking place at the end of Side 1 of the Audio Reel-to-Reel. It records the meeting of an unidentified organization. The agenda items focus on the approval and administration of medical programs with a focus on the Houston area. The recordings feature the introduction of proposals/items, debate, amendments, and voting.

The recording opens with a vote of disapproval, followed by a movement to re-open and motion to defer. There is a motion for reconsideration of Proposal 6. Following a discussion of the program and funds, the motion is withdrawn.

(8:02) Items 7, 8, and 9. "Projects relating to recruitment, education, improved training for allied health personnel.” It is recommended that it be referred back to the coordinator of Regional Medical Programs and that he form a special committee or task force to develop a proposal. An Amendment is proposed to consider Item 9 relating to junior colleges separately. Other programs up for discussion and vote are an educational media instructional program and a program for medical service assistants, clinical research, and administration. There is discussion of whether these proposals should be considered separately. There is a vote on an amendment to consider 9 separately. There is consideration of the role of junior colleges in paramedical training. There is a vote with 19 in favor to send Items 7 and 8 to committee.

(20:10) Item 9 “Recruitment of allied healthcare workers.” There is a movement for approval followed by discussion. A speaker notes that it would augment and amplify an existing project and establish an advisory committee. One speaker addresses Dr. Eastwood (possibly Dr. Richard T. Eastwood, President of the TMC). It is noted that one aspect of the proposal was intended to bring together elements related to junior colleges, but more important was total recruitment of allied healthcare workers. There is a vote with 19 in favor.

(27.42) Proposal 10 “Extending primary care nursing training based in Riverside and St. Joseph's.” The Steering committee had recommended deferring action on this proposal and appointing a subcommittee, after which there was a recommendation for approval. There is a motion to approve Item 10. A speaker alludes to a program already ongoing, but the recording ends abruptly.

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Harris County Medical Society commercials (4)

This Harris County Medical Society sound recording comes from a 12" phonograph record. It contains four commercials, each one minute in length, regarding an upcoming vote for the location of the new Jefferson Davis Hospital. The segments cite increased traffic; duplication of administrative, maintenance, and personnel costs; and the geographic location of existing paitents as reasons to oppose a new facility in the Texas Medical Center and support a hospital on the present site. While the claims are mostly the same, each segment offers a slightly different way to frame the argument. The segments evoke radio programs such as quiz shows and mysteries. While the claims are mostly the same, each segment offers a slightly different way to frame the argument. Each segment concludes with a variation of the refrain "On July 26 vote for the new Jefferson Davis Hospital on the present site. Vote 'for' the hospital issue on July 26." Each segment runs approximately one minute, with a total recording time of 4:12 minutes.
Segment 1 (0:01) "The truth about Jefferson Davis Hospital" poses "Did you Know?" questions and concludes responses with "That's the Truth About JD."
Segment 2 (1:01) "The Case of the Dislocated Hospital" poses a mixture of questions and statements and invites "you the taxpayer to solve the case." This segment offers additional statistics and other information about the patients served by the hospital.
Segment 3 (2:06) uses the framing "Your Dr. Recommends...." to make the case.
Segment 4 (3:05) "Here's the case of tax vs. fiction on the hospital issue" frames opponents' arguments as "Fiction has it..." and then tells the audience "Fact has it...."

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“The Texas Medical Center”, Methodist Hospital, Raymond O’Leary, production by TMC, Inc, color

This film contains a program titled “The Texas Medical Center” from approximately 1972. It begins with an overview of the TMC and its history. The bulk of the program is dedicated to a video tour of the TMC, offering brief characterizations of many of its hospitals and educational institutions.

The credits read: “The Texas Medical Center. This film was made possible through the cooperation of the administrators and staff of all institutions in the Texas Medical Center. Production coordinated by Texas Medical Center, Inc. with the full support and cooperation of the Council of Directors and Administrators. These people made special contributions of their technical skills: Manfred Gygli, William R. Pittman, Gloria J. Heard, Herbert R. Smith, Mario Paoloski, Ken Wiedower, Joachim Zwer. Narrated by Don Macon. Produced and Directed by Raymond O’Leary.”

The U-matic tape AVV-IC002-005 is a transfer/duplicate of this program.

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Jesse H. Jones Library Dedication, workprint, color

This 16mm color film is a workprint with no sound. It records the dedication ceremony of an expansion to the Jesse H. Jones Library, home of the Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center Library, on May 25, 1973.
(0:01) The film opens with images of people milling about. Some of them are holding scissors and ribbons.
(0:16) The film cuts to two men in front of the Library building doors, exchanging a ceremonial key.
(0:23) The next segment cuts to a stage with a podium and microphone in front of Library. There are images of people walking around, seemingly in preparation for the event.
(0:31) As this segment begins, the event is underway. A man stands speaking at the podium, with others seated behind him on stage. The Library is visible in the background.
(1:10) A plaque honoring John T. Armstrong, MD is unveiled.
(1:36) Presentation of a portrait--a drawing of a man's head in three-quarter profile.
(2:10) TMC President Richard T. Eastwood is presented with a framed text, which appears to be a resolution by the Houston Academy of Medicine.
(2:29) As the program continues, the film cuts from a close-up on the activity on stage to several wider views also showing the stage as well as the seated audience in front of the Jones Library exterior.
Note: This workprint corresponds to the original film AVF-IC002-006. It contains the same scenes at the original, but the first two scenes of this workprint appear at the end of the original.

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Jesse H. Jones Library Dedication, original footage, color

This 16mm color film is an original with no sound. It records the dedication ceremony of an expansion to the Jesse H. Jones Library, home of the Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center Library, on May 25, 1973.
The film opens on a scene on a stage with a podium and microphone in front of Library. There are images of people walking around, seemingly in preparation for the event.
(0:08) As this segment begins, the event is underway. A man stands speaking at the podium, with others seated behind him on stage. The Library is visible in the background.
(0:49) A plaque honoring John T. Armstrong, MD is unveiled.
(1:16) Presentation of a portrait--a drawing of a man's head in three-quarter profile.
(1:49) TMC President Richard T. Eastwood is presented with a framed text, which appears to be a resolution by the Houston Academy of Medicine.
(2:09) As the program continues, the film cuts from a close-up on the activity on stage to several wider views showing the stage as well as the seated audience in front of the Jones Library exterior.
Note: This original film corresponds to the workprint AVF-IC002-005. It contains the same scenes at the workprint, but the final two scenes of this film appear at the beginning of the workprint.

Sans titre

Jesse H. Jones Library Groundbreaking, workprint, color

This 16mm color film is a workprint with no sound. It records the groundbreaking ceremony of an expansion to the Jesse H. Jones Library, home of the Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center Library, on May 25, 1973. The film opens with a very brief shot of three men seated in chairs conversing. The men may be Dr. Frederick C. Elliott, William B. Bates, and W. Leland Anderson. Beyond them stands the Library, a podium, an easel, and ceremonial shovels in the ground.
(0:04) The film cuts to TMC President Richard T. Eastwood speaking at the podium in front of the Library.
(0:13) The film focuses on the ceremonial shovels in the disturbed earth, before panning out to show Eastwood, the seated audience, the Library exterior, and the easel with an image, presumably of the Library expansion.
(0:29) In this segment a new, unidentified speaker is at the podium.
(1:02) Another unidentified man speaks at the podium.
(1:12) The film cuts to Eastwood and two other men with the shovels for the ceremonial groundbreaking.
(1:29) William Bates and two other men use the shoves to continue breaking ground.
(1:54) A group of other men take their turns breaking ground.
(2:38) A different group of men take their turns with the shovels.
(2:55) Frederick Elliott shovels dirt alongside Richard Eastwood and another man as William Bates and another man look on.
(3:06) The film cuts to a bulldozer beginning to tear up the turf.
(3:40) Three unidentified men break ground with the shovels.
(3:49) In a segment shot from behind the podium, the camera pans across the greenspace where the event was held as people walk around.
Note: This workprint corresponds to the original film AVF-IC002-008. The two appear to be identical, save for a slight difference in timing.

Sans titre

Jesse H. Jones Library Groundbreaking, original footage, color

This 16mm color film is an original with no sound. It records the groundbreaking ceremony of an expansion to the Jesse H. Jones Library, home of the Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center Library, on May 25, 1973. The film opens with a very brief shot of three men seated in chairs conversing. The men may be Dr. Frederick C. Elliott, William B. Bates, and W. Leland Anderson. Beyond them stands the Library, a podium, an easel, and ceremonial shovels in the ground.
(0:04) The film cuts to TMC President Richard T. Eastwood speaking at the podium in front of the Library.
(0:13) The film focuses on the ceremonial shovels in the disturbed earth, before panning out to show Eastwood, the seated audience, the Library exterior, and the easel with an image, presumably of the Library expansion.
(0:29) In this segment a new, unidentified speaker is at the podium.
(1:02) Another unidentified man speaks at the podium.
(1:12) The film cuts to Eastwood and two other men with the shovels for the ceremonial groundbreaking.
(1:29) William Bates and two other men then use the shoves to continue breaking ground.
(1:54) A group of other men then take their turns breaking ground.
(2:38) A different group of men take their turns with the shovels.
(2:55) Frederick Elliott shovels dirt alongside Richard Eastwood and another man as William Bates and another man look on.
(3:06) The film cuts to a bulldozer beginning to tear up the turf.
(3:40) Three unidentified men break ground with the shovels.
(3:49) In a segment shot from behind the podium, the camera pans across the greenspace where the event was held as people walk around.
Note: This workprint corresponds to the original film AVF-IC002-008. The two appear to be identical, save for a slight difference in timing.

Sans titre

Greffe du Coeur Humain

Demonstration dated 04/17/1969 of transplantation of the human heart. A plastic bubble oxygenator is used. Film has voice over narration by Lucien Stervinou and illustrations by Barry Baker.

Surgical Treatment of Ventricular Septal Defects: Technique & Results in 292 Cases

Summary from 1961 of techniques used in surgical treatment of ventricular septal defects, including demonstration of pediatric surgery. Two treatment techniques are demonstrated: suture and Dacron patch graft prothesis. A pump oxygenator is used. Film has voice over by Don Macon and illustrations by Barbara Tuttle.

Prosthesis for Aortic Valve Replacement

Demonstration from 1968 of Cooley-Liotta-Cromie prosthesis for aortic valve and surgical replacement of the aortic valve with the prosthesis. Prosthesis is a titanium ball in Dacron velour covered prosthesis for aortic valve replacement. The film has voice over narration by Don Macon and illustrations.

Cardiac Valve Replacement Using An Improved Prosthesis

Demonstration circa 1966 of replacement of cardiac valves using the SCDK-Cutter double caged valve prosthesis. Surgeries use disposable bubble oxygenators and replace mitral or aortic valves. Statistics on surgeries for 250 patients are provided. The film has voice over narration by Don Macon and illustrations by Herb Smith, Kathleen Norris, and Robin Hanson.

Surgical Treatment of Atrial Septal Defects

  • Discussion and demonstration from 1963 of surgical treatments for atrial septal defects. For a pediatric patient, sutures are used
  • for one adult and one child, Dacron patch grafts are implanted. Both surgeries use pump oxygenators. The film has voice over narration by Don Macon and illustrations by Barbara Tuttle.

Cardiac Monitoring in the Prevention and Treatment of Catastrophic Arrest

Discussion circa 1953 by Denton A. Cooley and an anaesthesiologist of cardiac arrest during surgical treatment of patients, with information on both prevention and treatment. Primary treatments include heart massage and ventilation. Some elements are illustrated with surgery on a dog. Film has voice over by Don Macon.

Comprehensive Surgical Management of Tetralogy of Fallot

Demonstration circa 1974 of surgical management of tetralogy of fallot in multiple pediatric patients. Palliative surgeries as well as later, total correction are demonstrated. A disposable bubble oxygenator is used. Film has voice over narration by Don Macon and illustrations by Barry Baker, Robin Hanson, Paulette Wells, and Herb Smith.

Two Stage Surgical Treatment of Transposition of Great Vessels

Demonstration circa 1966 through multiple surgeries of treatment for children born with aorta and pulmonary artery transposed. Using techniques developed by Blalock and Hamlin, palliative surgery is done in infancy with full correction done when the patient is older using the Mustard procedure. A pump oxygenator is used in the later surgery. Film has voice over by Don Macon and illustrations by Barry Baker, Herb Smith, and Paulette Wells.

Surgical Treatment of Post Infarction Left Ventricular Aneurysm

Demonstration circa 1968 of surgical treatment of left ventricular aneurysm, along with dissection of post-mortem heart. A disposable bubble oxygenator and Dacron sutures are used. Some statistical analysis of patient outcomes follows the demonstration. Film has voice over narration by Don Macon and illustrations by Herb Smith.

Aneurysm of Ascending Aorta and Arch With Aortic Regurgitation: Prosthetic Replacement of the Aortic Valve and Aortic Arch

Demonstration circa 1966 of surgical replacement of aortic valve and aortic arch. A Dacron patch and Smeloff-Cutter valve prosthesis are implanted and a disposable bubble oxygenator is used. The film also summarizes surgical techniques, prostheses, and patient outcomes for similar surgeries. Film has voice over narration by Don Macon and illustrations by Herb Smith, Kathleen Norris, and Robin Hanson.

Mitral Valve Replacement In Childhood

Demonstration circa 1968 of insertion of prosthesis to replace mitral valve in seven year old patient. A disposable bubble oxygenator is used. Statistics are included on the hospital's treatment of children with mitral valve stenosis. Film has voice over narration by Don Macon and illustrations by Barry Baker.

Cardiovascular Surgery in the First Year of Life

Demonstration dated 07/07/1979 of palliative surgery in infants with congenital heart disease. Because full surgical correction with cardiopulmonary bypass is too risky for infants, palliative surgery is performed. Conditions and treatments discussed include tricupid artresia potts anastomosis, transposition of the great vessels and creation of atrial septal defect, patent ductus arteriosis suture ligation, coarctation resection and anastomosis, congenital aortic vacsular ring division of couble aortic arch, ventricular septal defect pulmonary artery banding, and aortic stenosis valvotomy with modified caval occlusion. Statistics on patients and outcomes are included. Film has voice over narration by Don Macon.

Staged Cardiac Replacement

Demonstration from 4/7/1969 of cardiac replacement in two stages. First, after a failed attempt at surgical repair of the heart, a Liotta-Cooley artificial heart, Dacron tubes, and a Wada-Cutter hingeless valve prosthesis are implanted as a palliative measure. A donated heart is transplanted in a later surgery. A disposable bubble oxygenator is used. Film has voice over narration by Don Macon and illustrations.

Houston Hearts BBC Documentary

Documentary from 1968 discussing Denton A. Cooley's work, including surgical techniques, operating room atmosphere, and heart transplantation. Cooley and patients are interviewed, including footage of Cooley's family and band, The Heart Beats.

Camera Original Footage With Magnetic Sound-On-Film Stripe, Liotta Total Artificial Heart Console and Interview With Karp, Haskell 12 Hours After His Artificial Heart Implant April 4, 1969

Footage of Liotta Total Artificial Heart console and interview with Haskell Karp, the first recipient of an artificial heart, as he wakes up 12 hours after surgery. The Liotta-Cooley Artificial Heart was designed to allow patients in heart failure to wait until a human heart was available for transplantation.

The Houston Academy of Medicine - Texas Medical Center Library Meeting the Challenge

This 1” open-reel video tape opens with a graphic announcing the “Houston Academy of Medicine Texas Medical Center Library” The production highlights the history, purpose, value, and future of the Library. While the recording lasts 7:12, the actual content runs about 5:30.
Narration is by Ron Stone. The video was made possible by a gift from the Friends of the Texas Medical Center Library. It is a production of UT Television, the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1997.
The recording starts with color bars and test sound, followed by a blank screen. Content begins at 1:43.
(1:43) The video opens with historical images from the TMC Library, as the voiceover notes it “has never hesitated to meet the challenge of the future.”
(2:18) The video cuts to the present day, featuring images of students studying, including at computers. The narrator reiterates the Library’s purpose “to make knowledge accessible to the entire community.” The TMC Library’s new five-year plan is introduced.
(2:34) Naomi C. Broering, MLS, MA, Executive Director, HAM-TMC Library. She cites the support of the Houston Endowment and the M. D. Anderson Foundation. She highlights the plan to develop a Health Informatics Education Center, Consumer Health Information Service Area, Knowledge Management Center, and Conferences in Computers in Health Care. She cites the TMC Library’s involvement in telemedicine, teleconferencing, and remote distance learning.
(3:25) Damon Camille, Public Affairs Services, HAM-TMC Library. He stresses the importance of supporting library users in the places where they work and study. As the video shows images of students and faculty using computers, he talks about teaching people to access information online via the TMC Library.
(3:53) Larry S. Jefferson, MD, Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children’s Hospital. He testifies to the value of electronic access to MedLine, which he says is used on a daily basis. As he speaks, the video shows images of children and physicians in the hospital.
(4:25) Barbara Skjonsby, RN, BSN, Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children’s Hospital. The video shows images of children and caregivers in the hospital, while she highlights the TMC Library for access to medical studies that benefit patients.
(5:05) Randall Sharer, University of Texas-Houston Medical School. He highlights access to resources across schools and programs, saying the TMC Library Addresses everyone’s needs. The video shows images of students and/or colleagues studying.
(5:30) The video cuts to an exterior view of TMC Library and highlights its role as one of National Library of Medicine’s eight Regional Medical Libraries. It shows the MedLine website to highlight online access.
(5:50) The McGovern Historical Collections and Research Center is featured.
(6:08) The video cuts back to the TMC Library website. The narrator highlights the TMC Library’s ability to improve lives through the power of the IT infrastructure and the reach of the TMC Library’s information.
(6:35) Naomi C. Broering, MLS, MA, Executive Director, HAM-TMC Library. She highlights the Friends of the Library, the Library Board, foundations, institutions, and individuals who help support the Library. She praises their support for a program that will “build the library for the 21st century, the virtual library for the next millennium.”

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"AIDS: Protect Yourself!"

This ¾” U-Matic tape contains a program titled “AIDS: Protect Yourself!” from 1987. A project of the Harris County Medical Society and Houston Academy of Medicine, the educational program attempts to answer questions about AIDS and preventing its spread. The runtime is 16:03.
Credits:
“Special Thanks to: Baylor College of Medicine; Gulf Coast Regional Blood Center; Harris County Department of Education; Houston Community College; Instant Video Replay; Jefferson Davis Hospital; Ragin’ Cajun Restaurant; Region IV Education Service Center; Spring Branch Independent School District; Westchester Education Center; World Kook Sul Karate Association (Houston Branch).”
“Writer/Producer: Jay Olivier; Production Supervisor: Bob L. Gaspard; Production Coordinators: Wendy Olivier, Bob L. Gaspard, Jere Castillo; Susan Huff; Camera: Bob L. Gaspard, Jere Castillo, Jaroslav Vodenahl; Additional Video Provided by: The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, UT-TV, National Cancer Institute, KRPC-TV, Science Videos; Post Production Facility: The Editing Company, Houston; Art Work: Chartworks; Best Boy: Adam Cone. A Public Service Project of Harris County Medical Society and Houston Academy of Medicine, An Olivier Video Production, copyright Harris County Medical Society, 1987.”
Credits also list song credits and cast.
(0:01) Introduction featuring the song “Sign O’ the Times” by Prince
(1:06) Hosts Pip Newson and Jeff Bennett introduce the topic by posting questions about AIDS.
(1:40) Music resumes accompanying a montage of headlines about AIDS and images of people.
(2:19) In a shot of a school classroom, a young Attica Locke is briefly on camera.
(2:24) Accompanied by graphics and reenactments, the speakers explain AIDS—Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome—and how it works.
(4:57) The program stresses prevention and discusses how AIDS is spread. It also addresses rumors or misunderstandings regarding the potential spread of AIDS. A montage of activities that do not spread AIDS is set to Herbie Hancock’s song “Rockit.”
(8:08) The program talks about ways of protecting yourself, emphasizing saying “no” to drug use and casual sexual intercourse.
(9:55) The program discusses the spread of the AIDS epidemic worldwide.
(12:28) Child Psychiatrist Eileen Starbranch, MD interview. Dr. Starbranch discusses fear of AIDS and sexuality.
(13:16) Sam A. Nixon, MD interview. Dr. Nixon discusses AIDS prevention.
(13:49) The narration suggests talking to a doctor, parent, trusted teacher, or school nurse. It also suggests reaching out to a local medical society or the National AIDS Hotline.
(14:49) The program reviews the information presented with text graphics accompanied by Cyndi Lauper’s song “Boy Blue.”
(14:52) The hosts conclude the program: “AIDS is a dangerous and deadly disease. So be smart.” A school classroom answers: “Protect Yourself!”

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Conversations with the Past: "The Pioneering Spirit in American Medicine" by Dr. Virginia Allen

This 3/4” U-Matic tape contains a lecture titled "The Pioneering Spirit in American Medicine" by Dr. Virginia Allen of the Office of Scientific Publications in the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The lecture took place April 16, 1980, and it was a part of the series “Conversations with the Past: History of Health Sciences.” The recording runs 42:36, with about 41 minutes of lecture content. According to the credits, it was a Medical Community Television System Production. The recording is a duplication, in color.
(0:01) Video starts with blank screen, color bars, and countdown.
(0:29) Program begins with TMC Librarian Beth White at a podium introducing medical historian Dr. Virginia Allen.
(1:14) Dr. Allen begins her talk, “Pioneering Spirit in American Medicine.”
(3:36) Dr. John Potts, early Physician General to the Virginia Colony.
(4:08) Preacher physicians.
(4:45) Cotton Mather of Boston, a preacher and—according to Dr. Allen—the first significant figure in American medicine.
(9:10) Mather’s chief medical accomplishment: promoting smallpox inoculation. In an early instance of applying statistical analysis in medicine, he tracked mortality for those inoculated compared to the general population.
(13:05) Mather wrote the first general treatise on medicine in the United States, The Angel of Bethesda, 1724. However, it was not published.
(16:22) Dr. Ephraim McDowell, raised in Kentucky and practiced there, and was educated in Edinburgh, Scotland.
(20:28) McDowell diagnosed and removed an ovarian tumor in Jane Crawford. It was the first time such an operation had been performed and the patient lived.
(28:17) Dr. William Beaumont of Connecticut, licensed in 1812, became an Army surgeon and in 1820 was stationed at Fort Mackinac.
(32:23) In 1822, seventeen-year-old Alexis St. Martin, an employee of the American Fur Company, was accidentally shot. Beaumont cared for him, eventually moving him into his home. There remained a hole in St. Martin’s stomach; Beaumont did experiments and discovered the basics of digestion. He published his Observations in 1832.
(40:30) Dr. Allen notes she is out of time but had wanted to speak about Elizabeth Blackwell and Daniel Drake. She concludes by reflecting on the pioneering spirit at work in the Texas Medical Center.

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Conversations with the Past: "Dentistry" by Ernest Beerstecher, PhD

This 3/4” U-Matic tape contains a lecture titled "Dentistry" by Ernest Beerstecher, PhD. The lecture took place April 23, 1980, and it was a part of the series “Conversations with the Past.” The recording runs 50:55, with about 50 minutes of lecture content. According to the credits, it was a Medical Community Television System Production. Sally Webb is Producer/Director. Mark Adamcik, Linda A. Morales, and Marilyn Caplovitz were the Technical Staff. The recording is a duplication, in color.
(0:01) The recording begins with videotape leader and a countdown.
(0:20) Program begins with TMC Librarian Beth White at a podium introducing Dr. Ernest Beerstecher, Chairman of Department of Biochemistry at UT Dental Branch and Professor of Dental History.
(0:45) Dr. Beerstecher begins his talk by discussing the history of the TMC land, which he claims was owned by a physician in Spanish Texas in 1820.
(2:46) Dr. Beerstecher discusses his interest in history and its role in predicting the future.
(3:53) He discusses present challenges in dentistry and other medical professions, particularly in reference to advertising and the Federal Trade Commission.
(6:25) History of dentistry. Glossing over ancient history, starting with the Renaissance. He discusses the historical role of priests and barbers.
(8:39) Dentistry as a craft and dentistry as a branch of medicine. These two paths crossed in the U.S. around 1800.
(9:41) Dentistry’s patron saint, Saint Apollonia.
(11:15) Dentistry in art. Presentation slides show art depicting the craftsman dentist.
(14:33) Professional tradition of dentistry, emergent in France. Images and discussions of dental literature. In 1728 Pierre Fauchard published his book The Surgical Dentist. Some of his students came to America. Dr. Beerstecher notes that France had been an early leader in dentistry, but after the French Revolution and the revocation of professional licensing standards, French dentistry declined.
(18:26) American dentists. He mentions George Washington and his dental troubles. Paul Revere practiced dentistry. Revere can be considered the father of American forensic dentistry because he identified General Warren’s body from the Battle of Bunker Hill based on his teeth.
(23:33) Spanish Texas required a license to practice dentistry. Don Pedro Lartique, one of Fauchard's students, received his license in San Antonio in 1806. Dr. Beerstecher claims it’s the oldest dental license in America, and that it became a model for other licenses. After Independence in Texas, there were no more licensing requirements, so more dentists appeared.
(28:51) Texas dentists advertised in newspapers. Dr. Davis in Galveston, Dr. Evans in Houston, Dr. Marks in Houston, barber-surgeon Henry Doebelmann in Houston. Presentation slides show advertisements as well as statistics about dentists in Texas.
(33:22) Organization of dental societies, dental journals, dental schools, and licensing starting in Texas in the 1830s.
(35:18) Dr. Beerstecher uses Doc Holliday to illustrate the experience of dental students.
(41:00) Holliday was born in Georgia then attended the Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery. It was in a medical center near medical schools, hospitals, and the like. Dr. Beerstecher describes what it was like to study dentistry there.
(45:00) After dental school, Holliday had a practice in Georgia, but moved west after learning he had tuberculosis. In Dallas he began making dentures and doing other behind-the-scenes dental work, even winning awards. He started playing cards and eventually left town. He later died of tuberculosis.
(47:15) Emphasis on dental education in Texas in 1870s and 1880s, although there was no school. Eventually a school was planned for Galveston, but did not come to pass. In Houston in 1905, a group of citizens including John Henry Kirby advocated and raised money for a dental school at Travis and Congress.
(49:01) Concluding his talk, Dr. Beerstecher emphasizes that an interest in education has been central to the history of Texas dentistry.

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Conversations with the Past: "History of Malaria" by Richard Conklin, MD

This 3/4” U-Matic tape contains a lecture titled "History of Malaria" by Richard Conklin, MD, Assistant Professor of Pathology & Lab Medicine at University of Texas Medical School. The lecture took place May 21, 1980, and it was a part of the series “Conversations with the Past.” The recording runs 46:02, with about 44 minutes of lecture content. According to the credits, it was a Medical Community Television System Production. The recording is a duplication, in color, with stereo sound.
(0:01) The recording begins with color bars and black screen.
(0:33) Title card
(0:55) Dr. Conklin introduces his talk, noting the long history of malaria, as well as rising concern among Europeans when they began colonizing the tropics.
(3:10) He notes the Greeks understood the association with marshes, described the clinical syndromes, and attempted control measures.
(3:48) New developments beginning in the 16th century: therapy, discovery of the parasite, the mosquito’s role, and control.
(4:40) Therapy. Cinchona bark.
(8:20) Jesuit Juan Lopez, first recorded person to bring cinchona bark to Europe. Cardinal Juan de Lugo received it, eventually using it and becoming an advocate for it.
(10:30) In England, [Oliver] Cromwell opposed it. Later Dr. [Thomas] Sydenham did trials on it, finding it worked on intermittent fevers. In Italy, Dr. [Francesco] Torti separated continuous and intermittent fevers in his testing.
(11:36) Astronomer Dr. [Charles Marie] de la Condamine described the trees and sent results to [Carl] Linnaeus, who cataloged it.
(12:28) [Charles] Ledger, born 1818 in London, introduced alpacas from Peru to Australia.
(17:38) Ledger sent his assistant Manuel to gather cinchona seeds. The British acquired their own cinchona seeds. The Dutch purchased Ledger’s seeds and planted them in the Dutch East Indies (Java). Ledger’s seeds outperformed the British ones.
(21:18) At the outbreak of World War II, Java produced all the world’s quinine. An expedition to the Philippines gathered seeds and gave them to Merck Company, which planted them in Guatemala. After the war, synthetic options were available, and the plantations in Guatemala were abandoned. But they were restored, and new ones were planted once resistant strains emerged.
(23:28) Parasite. Charles Alphonse Laveran, born in Paris, the first person to see a malaria parasite. He went to Algeria in 1878, began to study malaria patients, and made observations. In 1907 he received the Nobel Prize. [Camillo] Golgi distinguished three different parasites.
(28:34) Vector: the mosquito. An American, Dr. Albert Freeman Africanus King outlined this possibility. British and Russian researchers also looked at vectors.
(30:15) Patrick Manson, founder of the London School of Tropical Medicine. He was the first to report the mosquito as vector for a human parasite, including for malaria. However, he thought the mosquito got the parasite from water, not from another human. [Robert] Koch was first to suggest human-to-mosquito-to-human transmission.
(32:56) Theobald Smith, from Albany, New York, studied cattle disease caused by ticks. He proved an insect could transmit to disease to humans. David Bruce also showed transmission of disease among cattle by the tsetse fly.
(34:25) Ronald Ross, a student of Manson’s, studied the mosquito-malaria hypothesis in India and established the linkage. Others confirmed his work. Dr. Manson and Dr. [Giovanni Battista] Grassi tested this on human subjects.
(37:26) News travelled to America. Walter Reid learned about it and started exploring control.
(38:20) Control. Walter Reed and [Dr. William C.] Gorgas went to Cuba to work on control for yellow fever and malaria. Gorgas then worked on control for the building of the Panama Canal.
(40:38) New phase of control begins when a new mosquito was introduced to Brazil. Rockefeller Foundation supported control efforts across large areas.
(42:42) World War II. Synthetic insecticides. WHO set out to eradicate malaria worldwide. But these efforts also resulted in pollution and resistance in some mosquitos.
(44:16) Next phase: biological controls.

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Conversations with the Past: "Development of the Texas Medical Center" by Dr. William Seybold

This 3/4” U-Matic tape contains a lecture titled "Development of the Texas Medical Center " by Dr. William Seybold. The lecture took place April 30, 1980, and it was a part of the series “Conversations with the Past.” The recording runs 31:31 with about 30 minutes of lecture content. According to the credits, it was a Medical Community Television System Production. The recording is a duplication, in color.
(0:01) The recording begins with color bars.
(0:16) Program begins with TMC Librarian Beth White at a podium introducing Dr. William Seybold, recently retired.
(0:58) Dr. Seybold comes to the podium and begins his talk.
(2:53) Beginnings of the TMC. “In the beginning there was a dream.” Almost 40 years ago. Monroe D. Anderson, Colonel W. B Bates, John H. Freeman, Arthur Cato, Dean John W. Spies, Dr. E. W. Bertner, Dr. Frederick C. Elliott.
(5:04) Monroe D. Anderson of Anderson Clayton Company. William Bates and John Freeman helped establish the Anderson Foundation.
(7:32) Anderson died, and the Foundation was chief beneficiary. Horace Wilkins was a new trustee.
(8:55) Texas Legislature authorized a state cancer hospital in 1941. Cato, Bertner, and Spies had all been interested in a cancer hospital. Various organizations supported.
(12:18) Trustees of the Anderson Foundation met with University of Texas officials. Agreement to locate the cancer hospital in Houston. Foundation offered temporary facilities and matching funds.
(13:03) Dr. Bertner was appointed Acting Director. Land was acquired from the City of Houston, but construction had to wait until after the war. Drs. Bertner and Elliot articulated plans for a medical center.
(15:20) In 1943 the private Dental College in Houston becomes part of the University of Texas and got a site in the medical center. Bertner and Elliott envisioned Schools of Medicine, Nursing, and Public Health, as well as hospitals.
(15:55) Hermann Hospital, Methodist Hospital, a children’s hospital, a tuberculosis hospital, and perhaps others.
(16:23) Baylor College of Medicine decided to leave Dallas. Trustees of Baylor and Trustees of the Anderson Foundation made arrangements to bring the school to Houston.
(18:44) Advancement of the Medical Center after World War II. Texas Medical Center, Inc. chartered and Dr. Bertner elected President. The Anderson Foundation provided land and funds to TMC entities. Support also came from the Cullens and the Chamber of Commerce.
(21:30) Dr. Bertner’s vision for the Medical Center, including his speech to the Kiwanis.
(23:07) Dr. Seybold contends the war had established public support for medical research.
(24:18) Dr. R. Lee Clark, Jr.’s appointment as Director of M. D. Anderson Hospital for Cancer Research in 1946. The opening of Baylor’s new building in 1948. The appointment of Dr. Michael DeBakey as Head of Department of Surgery. In 1950, the construction of the new Methodist Hospital. The appointment of Leland Anderson to lead the Medical Center Board. In 1952, Dr. Elliot named Vice-President and Executive Director of the Medical Center.
(26:37) Dr. Seybold offers information from the Texas Medical Center’s 1979 Annual Report. In conclusion, he reflects on its future.

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Conversations with the Past: "Sir William Osler: On the Student, Teacher, Libraries, and Medicine" by John P. McGovern, MD

Thi 3/4” U-Matic tape contains a lecture titled, "Sir William Osler: On the Student, Teacher, Libraries, and Medicine " by John P. McGovern, MD. The lecture took place May 14, 1980, and it was a part of the series “Conversations with the Past.” The recording runs 49:12 with about 48 minutes of lecture content. According to the credits, it was a Medical Community Television System Production. The recording is a duplication, in color, with stereo sound.
(0:01) The recording begins with a countdown and title card.
(0:12) Program begins with TMC Librarian Beth White at a podium introducing Dr. John P. McGovern, Director of the McGovern Allergy Clinic and Clinical Professor at Baylor College of Medicine and UT Medical School.
(1:07) Dr. McGovern approaches the podium and begins his talk.
(4:37) Dr. McGovern begins recounting Osler’s influence on modern American medicine and medical education.
(8:11) Dr. McGovern begins offering a biography of Sir William Osler. Osler was born in Ontario, July 12, 1949, went to Trinity College in Toronto, and then studied medicine at McGill in Montreal in 1872. He opened his practice and also served as a lecturer and did research at McGill.
(12:23) Dr. McGovern notes Osler then became the Chair of Clinical Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania in June 1884. He taught at the bedside and in the clinic.
(14:04) Dr. McGovern adds that in 1889 Osler became the first Physician-in-Chief at the new Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. He wrote his Principles and Practice of Medicine. He married Grace Revere Osler and they had a son, Revere.
(15:39) Dr. McGovern tells of Osler taking the position Chair as Regius Professor of Medicine of at Oxford in 1904/1905. Osler helped organize medical corps and hospital system in England when World War I started. His son died in Flanders. Osler died December 29, 1919.
(17:38) Students. Dr. McGovern reads quotations from or about Osler regarding students.
(24:11) Teachers. Dr. McGovern reads quotations from or about Osler regarding teachers.
(29:46) Libraries. Dr. McGovern reads quotations from or about Osler regarding libraries. The Osler Library at McGill.
(35:36) Medicine. Dr. McGovern reads quotations from or about Osler regarding medicine.
(38:21) Patients. Dr. McGovern reads quotations from or about Osler regarding patients.
(40:10) Physicians. Dr. McGovern reads quotations from or about Osler regarding physicians.
(43:46) Dr. McGovern concludes his talk with quotations from others about Osler.

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Interview with W. Leland Anderson

W. Leland Anderson. Interviewed by Don Macon. Mr. Anderson, President of the Board of TMC, Inc., discusses the Anderson Clayton Company and the family relationship with the founders. He talks about his uncle, Mr. M. D. Anderson, Dr. E. W. Bertner and the trustees of the M. D. Anderson Foundation. He discusses the evolution of the Texas Medical Center and the formation of the TMC, Inc., defining the function of its Board of Directors. (MDAH Master #64-1-73)

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Interview with Hines H. Baker

Hines H. Baker. Interviewed by Don Macon. Mr. Baker, former President of Humble Oil & Refining Company, reviews his long association there and later with Standard Oil. He tells of his early life on farms in Big Valley and Medina, Texas and the basis of his decision to become a lawyer. He recalls his education in a rural school and the home study required to secure entrance credits into the University of Texas, part of which he earned by passing the examination for a teacher's certificate. Graduating with academic and law degrees, Mr. Baker practiced for a time before joining Humble Oil & Refining Company in 1919. He discusses his participation in the Ex-Student Association and the Development Board of the University of Texas, his membership on the Board of TMC, Inc. and his work with the Houston Chamber of Commerce and their successful fundraising campaign for construction in the Texas Medical Center. Mr. Baker reveals his love for his family and his church. He pays tribute to the University of Texas for the important part it played in his life as he says what education means. (MDAH Master #48-1-73)

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Interview with Colonel William B. Bates, Part 1 of 3

Col. William B. Bates, Part 1 of 3. Interviewed by Don Macon. Col. Bates, a prominent attorney, educator and philanthropist, tells of his childhood on a farm in Nacogdoches where he was one of 13 children. He worked his way through school and graduated from the University of Texas School of Law in Austin in 1915, after which he established his first law practice in Bay City; this was interrupted by World War I where Col. Bates had an illustrious military career. (Continued in Part 2) (MDAH Master #29-1-73)

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Interview with Colonel William B. Bates, Part 2 of 3

Col. William B. Bates, Part 2 of 3. Interviewed by Don Macon. Col. Bates discusses some of his experiences as district attorney in three East Texas counties shortly after World War I. These include bootleggers and members of the Klu Klux Klan. In later 1922, he traveled to Houston seeking a connection to further his career in law. He joined the firm of Fulbright & Crooker on January 1, 1923. Mr. John Freeman became a partner in the firm, as did Col. Bates. Col. Bates worked closely with members of the Anderson-Clayton firm for many years. He tells of his association with Mr. M. D. Anderson and the eventual establishment of the M. D. Anderson Foundation. Col. Bates relates the story of the planning and implementation of the state cancer research hospital, its temporary quarters in the Baker estate, the concept of a Texas Medical Center and acquisition of its land, the move of Baylor College of Medicine from Dallas to Houston, the permanent structure for the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Research Institute, the University of Texas Dental Branch, and other institutions in the medical center. (MDAH Master #29-1-73)

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Interview with Colonel William B. Bates, Part 3 of 3

Col. William B. Bates, Part 3 of 3. Interviewed by Don Macon. Col. Bates discusses further the relationships of the M. D. Anderson Foundation and the institutions in the Texas Medical Center. He speaks of Dr. E. W. Bertner and Dr. R. Lee Clark. Col. Bates then turns to his interest in education and Texas History. He describes the evolution of the University of Houston and his participation in the San Jacinto historical Association. A discussion of the involvement of the Houston Chamber of Commerce in the development of the Texas Medical Center concludes the series. (MDAH Master #30-1-73)

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Interview with Isaac Berenblum, MD, and Philippe Shubik, D.Phil., DM

"Video Profiles": An interview with Isaac Berenblum, MD, and Philippe Shubik, D.Phil., DM, Recipients of the 1978 Ernst W. Bertner Memorial Award. Interviewed by Don Macon. An MDA-TV Presentation. Department of Medical Communication. Produced for Office of the President. 3/3/1978. (Program #94-1-78). The recording runs 28:43 minutes.
(0:01) Don Macon introduces the program and speakers. He notes the occasion of the 31st Annual Symposium on Fundamental Cancer Research, held in Houston and sponsored by M. D. Anderson, the National Cancer Institute, and the American Cancer Society, Texas Division, as well as in cooperation with the University of Texas Health Science Center and the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences. He introduces Professor Isaac Berenblum, Professor Emeritus at the Weizmann Institute in Israel, and Dr. Philippe Shubik of the Eppley Institute for Research in Cancer in Nebraska.
(2:24) The interview starts with Berenblum explaining their relationship and how they devised experiments together at Oxford. Berenblum then gives an account of his time as a medical student, primarily interested in research rather than practicing medicine. At the time a new cancer department was being established at Leeds University. After eight years at Leeds he received a fellowship and went to Oxford.
(6:12) Shubik offers his own account of medical school at Oxford and his desire to do research. He then served as a doctor during the war. He discusses the School of Pathology at Oxford and the opportunity to study with the discoverers of penicillin as well as Berenblum. During his clinical education he saw the first patients treated with penicillin. He speaks about Berenblum’s approach and influence. He notes how his exposure to tropical medicine, preventative medicine, and environmental factors influenced his approach to cancer research.
(9:13) Macon steers the conversation to the Bertner Award they have just received. work. Berenblum discusses the phases of their work with carcinogenesis. He describes their initial excitement, a “latent period,” where others did not show much interest, and a time about 10 years ago when the idea gained traction. He says clinicians and epidemiologists noticed that what they'd been studying in animals could have application to people. He notes there are now 20-25 research centers actively pursuing the two-step mechanism.
(11:45) Shubik notes how the slow-running experiments offered him time to do research and chemistry, as well as to get his license to work with animals. Berenblum had done work on environmental carcinogens. He reflects on their small but fairly comprehensive program in carcinogenesis.
(14:50) Berenblum discusses his move to start a new department at the Weizmann Institute in Israel in 1950. They had suggested a department of cancer research, whereas he proposed a department of experimental biology. He notes a colleague did the same for biochemistry.
(17:50) Berenblum speaks to the development of academic excellence at that Institute and within Israel generally.
(20:24) Shubik discusses his move from Oxford to Nebraska, including at stop at Northwestern University. He then had the opportunity to build a new department at the new Chicago Medical School, which allowed him to run some experiments he was interested in. He discusses experiments. He notes he moved to Omaha in the late 1960s and highlights that program’s emphasis on carcinogenesis.
(26:32) Berenblum interjects with a story relating to the question of scholarship in Israel.
(27:24) The interview wraps up.

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Interview with Ted Bowen

Mr. Ted Bowen. Interviewed by Don Macon. Video tape recorded 4/26/1974. Approximately 30min. Color-sound. MDAH Master #94-1-74. Produced for Texas Medical Center Historical Resources Project. Summary: Mr. Bowen discussed his youth in Alto, Texas and college in Nacogdoches, after which he returned home to work as cashier at a local bank. He spoke of his military service at Camp Gruber, Oklahoma where as a member of the medical detachment he was an administrative officer for the large hospital there. He attributes his interest in hospital administration to this experience. After the war, Mr. Bowen said he attended Washington University and on graduation with an MA in Hospital Administration went to Barnes Hospital in St. Louis. Mr. Bowen discussed Mrs. Josie Roberts, Mrs. Ella Fondren, Mr. Hines H. Baker and others. He also discussed The Methodist Hospital's plans for the future.

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Interview with Dr. Benjamin F. Byrd, Jr.

Dr. Benjamin F. Byrd, Jr. Interviewed by Don Macon. Video tape recorded 1/23/1976. Approximately 25min, Color-sound, MDAHH Master #473-1-76. Produced for the University of Texas - Texas Medical Center Historical Resources Project. Summary: Dr. Byrd, current President of the American Cancer Society, discussed his educational training at Vanderbilt in Nashville, Tennessee where he was born and raised. He spoke of his own studies in cancer and those of the American Cancer Society and the American College of Surgeons Cancer Commission. Emphasis was lent to environmental and nutritional factors in breast cancer.

Interview with Benjamin L. Bird

Video Profiles: Interview with Benjamin L. Bird by Don Macon. An MDA-TV Presentation. Department of Medical Communication. Produced for the Office of the President. 6/22/1977. The recording runs 20:02 minutes.
(0:17) Don Macon introduces Ben Bird and explains his connection to the M. D. Anderson Hospital.
(1:46) Bird shares some details of his biography. He grew up, was educated, and worked in Oklahoma and Texas. He studied law at the University of Texas in Austin. He notes his associations with members of the University’s Board of Regents.
(6:53) He outlines the tax and legal issues he was brought in to sort out on behalf of M. D. Anderson Cancer Hospital. He discusses the creation of the Association of Physicians as well as the University Cancer Foundation. This balanced M. D. Anderson’s tax-exempt status with R. Lee Clark’s desire to attract and retain top talent.
(12:26) Bird continues to elaborate on the legal and tax instruments he helped establish for M. D. Anderson: the Institutional Plan, the Director’s Regulations, and the University Cancer Foundation.
(15:36) Bird’s discusses his other work and interests. He highlights his work for Abilene Christian College.

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Interview with Benjamin L. Bird

Video Profiles: Interview with Benjamin L. Bird by Don Macon. An MDA-TV Presentation. Department of Medical Communication. Produced for the Office of the President. 6/21/1977. The recording runs 37:29 minutes.
(0:20) Don Macon introduces Benjamin L. Byrd and explains his connection to the M. D. Anderson Hospital.
(1:28) Bird shares some details of his biography. He grew up, was educated, and worked in Oklahoma and Texas. He discusses his time in the oil field, as well as at Harvard. He later studied law at the University of Texas in Austin.
(6:40) Bird discusses his involvement in debate and public speaking. He notes his associations with members of the University of Texas’ Board of Regents—Tom Sealy, Bob Sorrell, and Leroy Jeffers.
(8:32) Bird elaborates on this time at the law school, including a role as law librarian.
(10:43) He discusses the beginning of his law practice in Fort Worth in 1931.
(11:50) Bird discusses the development of his career and his expertise in tax law. He notes a 2-year stint in Washington, D.C., followed by time in St. Louis, and his return to Texas to form the firm Weeks, Bird, and Cannon (later Appleman).
(16:03) Bird talks of meeting his wife, Emily Loving. He got to know her while working for her father, a U.S. District Court Judge.
(17:50) Bird speaks of his partner Weeks, Dr. R. Lee Clark, and their Wichita Falls connection.
(18:40) Bird recounts his emergent professional connection with the University of Texas in the 1950s. He outlines the tax and legal issues he was brought in to sort out on behalf of the University and the M. D. Anderson Cancer Hospital.
(22:06) He elaborates on the tax matters and his interactions with R. Lee Clark. He mentions the Physicians’ Referral Service and the question of whether a Charitable Hospital could have Unrelated Business Income.
(26:16) Macon offers a history of the origins of M. D. Anderson Hospital and the Texas Medical Center.
(30:24) Bird elaborates on the legal and tax instruments he helped establish for M. D. Anderson: University Cancer Foundation, Constitution for the Hospital, Director’s Regulations.
(36:18) Macon wraps up the interview.

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Interview with Randolph Lee Clark, MD

Randolph Lee Clark, MD. Interviewed by Don Macon. Dr. Clark was the son of educators and long-time president of MD Anderson Hospital. Dr. Clark discusses his personal and family history in the Texas towns of Hereford, Midland, and Wichita Falls. He talked about the founding of Add-Ran College, now known as Texas Christian University in Fort Worth, named after his great uncles Addison and Randolph Clark. Dr. Clark related his early interest in sports and activities at the summer resort of the College of the YMCA at Blue Ridge, South Carolina, where he worked for two seasons. He revealed the impact on his professional years of the 18 months he directed research for DuPont at their Newark, New Jersey Plant, after his graduation from the Universality of South Carolina with degrees in Chemical Engineering, English and Pre-Med, and before receiving his MD from the Medical College of Virginia in 1932. He talks about his fascinating career, his professional associations at home and abroad, his pioneering work in surgery and his long association with and love for the Anderson. The interview ends when he receives a phone call from the University of Texas. 11/30/1973, Color-sound. Produced for Texas Medical Center Historical Resources Project.

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Interview with Jared E. Clarke, MD

Jared E. Clarke, MD. Interview by Don Macon. Dr. Clarke, long time Houston physician, discusses his personal family history and his interest in medicine due to physicians in his family. He discusses his education and noted that he knew Dr. Bertner at the University of Texas Medical branch in Galveston although he was two years behind him, graduating in 1913. Dr. Clarke spoke of the hospital facilities in Houston after his return from World War I and the services of doctors prior to the era of the founding and development of the Texas medical Center. Dr. Clarke talked about the founding of the Houston Academy of Medicine and the beginnings of the library now housed in the Jesse H. Jones - TMC Library building. 2/11/1974, 43min, Color-sound (MDAH Master #83-1-74).

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Interview with Dr. Edward J. Cooksey, Part 1 of 2

Dr. Edward J. Cooksey, Part 1 of 2. Interviewed by Don Macon. Dr. Cooksey describes his early years growing up in Houston and of his first career as a pharmacist, before entering the Texas Dental College, where he taught pharmacology while studying for his DDS; he continued to teach there for many years. He tells how the school became part of the University of Texas System. He recounts his personal interest in the Houston Dental Society and his role in planning the Doctors Club. (Continued in Part 2). 5/2/1974, 25:30, (MDAH Master #96-1-74)

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