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Archival description
Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission Epidemiology
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Ivan F. Duff, MD papers

  • MS 090
  • Collection
  • 1967-1993

The Ivan Frances Duff, MD, papers, MS 90, consists of Dr. Duff's work in the field of rheumatology and his professional work in China and in Japan. The collection covers the years 1966-1993.

Dr. Ivan Frances Duff was born July 20, 1915 in Pendleton, Oregon. He died in October 1994. He graduated from the Univ. of Oregon and the Univ. of Michigan Medical School, where he completed his internship and residency training in internal medicine. In 1946 he joined the faculty of the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Michigan, as an instructor, becoming a Professor in 1960. Dr. Duff founded the Turner Geriatric Clinic a the University of Michigan Medical Center. His major interest was in the field of rheumatic diseases.

Dr. Duff was a member of U.S. Naval Reserve and served on active duty a commander in the Submarine Medical Service in the Pacific theater from 1942 to 1946. After the war, the returned to the University of Michigan where he joined the faculty of the Department of Internal Medicine.

Dr. Duff's interest in epidemiology led to studies with the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) beginning in 1964. He was a researcher with the ABCC from 1967-1975 and then with the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) from 1975-1986. He studied the incidence and prevelance of rheumatoid arthritis and gout in Hiroshima and Nagasak patients.

In 1980, Dr. Duff was a member of an American Physician Exchange Group of twelve doctors visiting the People's Republic of China at the invitation of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences. This initial visit led to a long relationship between Dr. Duff and the Chinese medical community. From 1981 to 1991, he was a research consultant at Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences Beijing, People's Republic of China, where he collaborated in epidemiologic studies of rheumatic diseases.

Dr. Duff was a leader in the field of rheumatology. He was the recipient of many awards and honors and served on many national panels. For a complete list of his accomplishments, please see Dr. Duff's vitae and obituary in this collection.

Dr. Duff died at his home in Ann Arbor, Michigan on Oct. 27, 1994 at the age of 79.

The materials are in good shape. However, some items were damaged and separated as a result of the 2001 flooding by Tropical Storm Allison, which devestated the Texas Medical Center and the archive of the HAM-TMC Library where this collection was stored. In the fall of 2013, an archivist discovered the missing folders in another collection where they had been stashed during the recovery process. The archivist reintegrated the newly discovered Duff files into MS 90. Old finding aids have been preserved to provide some scholars reference to the missing material. Where ever appropriate, Chinese or Japanese names are written with the surname first followed by the personal name. Some of the materials in this collection show water damage. Most of the damaged papers are in the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission papers in series III. The processing archivist made photo copies if the paper was badly degraded or flaking to pieces. Most of the materials are in good shape. The collection consists of 3.75 cubic feet (6 boxes).

Ivan F. Duff, MD

Robert W. Miller, MD papers

  • MS 101
  • Collection
  • 1921-2006

The Robert W. Miller, MD, papers, MS 101, includes materials from 1953 through 1998 related to the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) and the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF). Miller was the chief pediatric physician on the team that conducted the research and observations in Hiroshima. This collection encompasses this period of time in Dr. Miller's career, as well as scholarly work relating to the results of the ABCC's research. Dr. Miller donated his collection of personal and business correspondence, journal articles, book reviews, business reports, newspaper articles, pamphlets, and a book to the John P. McGovern Historical Collections and Research Center between 1994 and 1998. The materials are in good condition. The collection is 0.5 cubic feet (one box).

This collection contains four series: I. Biographical; II. Correspondence; III. Publications; and IV. Ephemera. This collection contains many journal articles that analyze the results of the research collected by the ABCC. One of the highlights of this collection is the personal letters written by Dr. Miller to his family during his time in Hiroshima, which gives a glimpse into the day to day life of the time.

Miller, Robert W.

William J. Schull, PhD papers

  • MS 067
  • Collection
  • 1945-2014

MS 67 the William J. Schull papers contains correspondence, interoffice memorandums, presentations, scientific works, journal reprints, monograph drafts, report drafts, travel diaries, travel receipts and itineraries, travel ephemera, other printed material, news clips, exhlbit material, photographs, 35 mm slides, audios tapes, video tapes, film, maps and realia in eighty-six cubic feet of material documenting his the life and works. Over 60 percent of the collection documents his life and work at the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) and Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) in Japan. Twenty five percent of the collection contains papers from his work for various governmental and non-governmental bodies about the effects of ionizing radiation. Another 8 cubic feet contains lbs from his personal life. Dr. Schull created travel diaries about the many international trips required for his work. The collection contains 62 typewritten travel diaries as well as many lbs of travel ephemera, mainly from Japan, collected by Dr. Schull. Dr. Schull wrote several books and the collection contains copies of the historical documents and photographs used in the creation of his books, notably "Song Among The Ruins," his memoir about his time at the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission. The major theme of this collection is epidemiological and genetic scientific innovation used to quantify the threat posed to the human race by ionizing radiation; to establish the probability of health outcomes to alleviate the fear of survivors, especially about the health of unborn generations; and to provide governments with facts about the consequences of the use of atomic weapons for war and nuclear energy for industrial purposes.

In addition to the records for ABCC and RERF (1945-2014), organizations with a large number of records in the collection include: ICRP, International Commission On Radiological Protection (1980-1995); ICRHER, International Consortium For Research On The Effects of Radiation (1990-2002); UNSCEAR, United Nations, Scientific Committee On The Effects Of Atomic Radiation (1987); WHO, United Nations World Health Organization, Health Effects of Chernobyl Accident (1990s); United States Department of Energy, Advisory Council On Nuclear Facility Safety (1990); United States Environmental Protection Agency, Science Advisory Board, Radiation Advisory Committee (1984-1990); and BRER, United States National Academy of Sciences, National Research Council, Board On Radiation Effects Research (1990s).

While the material is generally in good condition, some of the material suffered flood damage during tropical storm Allison in 2001. Although archivists discarded several lbs that could not be salvaged, they did preserve some material that may have value although flood damage is evident. With the damaged papers, some pages may be stuck together and handwritten notes may be faded beyond recognition. This damaged material is limited to four folders in two boxes, including box 40 folder 1; and box 42, folders 1, 2 and 3.

Dr. Schull collected and preserved all of the material in this collection in the course of his professional career and private life from 1945 to 2014. The collection consists of approximately 135 boxes including oversize and audiovisual. It consists of approximately 86 cubic feet of material.

Schull, William Jackson