Internal Medicine

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Internal Medicine

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Internal Medicine

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Internal Medicine

15 Authority record results for Internal Medicine

15 results directly related Exclude narrower terms

Byers, John R.

  • Person
  • 1876-1961

John R. Byers was born in Iowa on April 20, 1876 (gravestone says 1874) and died in Fort Dodge, Iowa, on February 25, 1961. He is buried at Cedar Township Cemetery in Fonda. He was living in South Palmyra, Macoupin County, Illinois, in 1920, and in Fonda, Pocahontas County, Iowa, in 1930. Lake Forest University operated the Rush Medical School from 1887 to 1898. His brother, Dr. Albert G. Byers, died in 1957 in Coggan/Coggon, Linn County, Iowa.

Chapman, Don

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n99254652
  • Person
  • 1916-2007

Donald Wilton Chapman was born in Bridgewater, Iowa, on May 21, 1916 and earned both his BA and MD from the University of Iowa. He served as a major in the US Army Medical Corps in the European Theater during World War II. Chapman moved to Houston in 1944 to become one of the ten original faculty members of Baylor College of Medicine. He taught and practiced for fifty years, was a member of numerous professional organizations, and taught as a visiting professor in medical schools around the United States and the world. The Harris County Medical Society awarded him the John P. McGovern Compleat Physician Award in 1976. Dr. Chapman died on May 3, 2007 in Houston.

Doak, Edmund K.

  • Person
  • 1909-2000

Edmond King Doak, (Jr.?) was born October 3, 1909, in Taylor, Texas, and died 29 November 2000 in Houston. His father was Edmond King Doak, Sr., MD, born August 9, 1878, in Lexington, Texas, and died December 20, 1971 in Taylor, Texas. Doak, Sr., was among the doctors who built a new hospital in Taylor in 1920.
Doak, Jr., graduated from the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1934 and was on the faculty at Baylor College of Medicine. He had an office in the Hermann Professional Building in 1974. Member of the American Diabetes Association; was on the Council 1959-1960.
He has (two?) entries in the Gazetteer of Texas Physicians and his papers are MS 049 at the Texas Medical Center archives. His portrait is N-1003.

Folley, Jarrett H.

  • Person
  • 1913-1991

Dr. Jarrett H. Folley served as the Medical Director of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) from 1950 to 1951, during his leave of absence from the Hichcock Clinic, Hanover, New Hampshire. The Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission was authorized by directive of the President of the United States in 1946. During the same year it was established under the auspices of the National Research Council with the support of the Atomic Energy Commission for the purpose of studying long-term medical effects of the atomic bombs exploded in Japan in 1945. In 1948 the ABCC initiated the first survey of the incidence of leukemia in populations exposed to high energy radiation by the explosion of an atomic bomb. Folley published his report on the incidence of leukemia in the survivors of the bombing in Hiroshima and Nagasaki in the American Journal of Medicine in 1952.

Folley was born August 25, 1913, in Syracuse, New York. He graduated from Harvard Medical School. His medical training included Mary Hitchock Memorial Hospital, New Haven Hospital, and University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Jarrett H. Folley's major interest was in the field of internal medicine. Jarrett H. Folley, M.D. served as the President of the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Clinic, Hanover, New Hampshire from 1964 to 1974. He died in May 8, 1991 in Windsor, Connecticut.

Fred, Herbert L.

  • https://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n88090673.html
  • Person
  • 1929-2018

Herbert Leonard Fred, MD was born June 11, 1929 in Waco, Texas. He was known for his contribution to medical education. He was an award-winning clinician, diagnostician, and professor of internal medicine. Dr. Fred, an emeritus American Osler Society member, centered his medical practice on the patient, championing the use of the mind and five senses to develop medical diagnoses.

In Waco, the Fred family was known for community service, keen athletic team support, and their jewelry store, L. Fred and Son. His father, Isadore (Isie) Fred (1897-1969) received a posthumous City of Waco Commemoration for contributions to the community. Famous for his zest for life and his warm heart, Isie was a friend of many community and national leaders in athletics and film. Dr. Fred’s mother was Helen Louise Marks (1905-1985). He had one sister, Shirley Fred Strauss (1932-2014). Dr. Fred’s paternal grandparents were Louis Fred (died 1940), a Prussian immigrant who became a naturalized citizen of the United States in 1908, and Pauline (Peshi) Fred (1866-1950). Dr. Fred’s maternal grandparents were Samuel Marks (1866-1932) and Fannie Marks (1869-1956). Dr. Fred married Lucille (Lucy) Therese Maule (born 1928) in 1954. They had three children: Stuart Fred (born 1955) and twins Nancy Lynn Fred Sadick and Michael Fred (born 1957). Dr. Fred and Lucy divorced in 1976. Dr. Fred married Judith Ann Edgar Biddington in 1978. She had four children from her first marriage: Lisa Collette Biddington (born 1961), Floyd Wesley Biddington (born 1965), Gregory Leonard Biddington (born 1969), and Stefani Biddington, (birth date unknown).

Dr. Fred spent his boyhood in Waco, Texas, graduating from Waco High School in 1946. He attended then Rice Institute (today Rice University) in Houston, TX, graduating in 1950. He attended medical school at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland from 1950 to 1954. He completed his medical training as an internist with a two year internship and residency at The University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah in 1957. Dr. Fred served as a Captain in the United States Air Force Medical Corps from 1957-1959, acting as Chief of Medicine at the Amarillo Air Force Base Hospital in Amarillo, Texas. He then returned to Salt Lake City first as Chief Resident, Department of Internal Medicine, at the Salt Lake City General Hospital and then as an Instructor in Medicine at the University of Utah College of Medicine from 1959 to 1961. In 1962, Dr. Fred and his young family moved to Houston, Texas where Dr. Fred accepted an appointment as Instructor in Medicine at Baylor University College of Medicine.

Dr. Fred worked at institutions in Houston, Texas for the remainder of his career. After holding a number of academic positions at Baylor from 1962 to 1969, Dr. Fred left Baylor to accept a position as Director of Medical Education at St. Joseph Hospital in 1969 where he continued until 1988. In addition, he accepted positions as Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine at the University Of Texas Graduate School Of Biomedical Sciences in 1968 and as Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, at The University of Texas Health Science Center in 1971, retaining both appointments today. From 1979 to 2002, Dr. Fred served as Adjunct Professor, Human Performance and Health Sciences, at his alma mater, Rice University. From 1988 to 1993, Dr. Fred held a position as the Educational Coordinator at the HCA Center for Health Excellence. Beginning in 1982, Dr. Fred served as a medical expert witness in a number of medical malpractice trials. Records pertaining to these trials from 1988 to 2011 are located in the Legal Series. These folders are restricted due to the use of patient names until 2050. Dr. Fred is a member of thirteen medical societies including the American Medical Joggers Association, American College of Physicians, American College of Chest Physicians, American College of Sports Medicine, American Medical Writers Association, and American Osler Society.

Dr. Fred received numerous awards for teaching excellence from students and peers. Highlights include: Outstanding Full-Time Clinical Faculty Member at Baylor University College of Medicine in 1964 and 1967; a citation from President Ronald Reagan in October 4, 1988 for 27 years as a medical educator; The Benjy F. Brooks, M.D. Outstanding Clinical Faculty Award from the Alumni Association of the University of Texas Medical School in Houston in 1999; honoree of The Herb Fred Medical Society, Inc., a corporation established in 2002 by former students; The American College of Physicians – American Society of Internal Medicine Distinguished Teacher Award along with election to Mastership in The American College of Physicians in 2004; the TIAA-CREF Distinguished Medical Educator Award in 2005; and The American College of Physicians Laureate Award in 2012.

Dr. Fred’s running and medical practices intersected. Some of his scholarly articles include clinical descriptions of long distance running effects on the human body and promote running as preventive medicine. He often combined participation in running events with visiting professorships and Grand Rounds at other medical institutions. Dr. Fred began his competitive running career by running marathons but later switched to ultra-marathons, 100 mile races lasting 24-26 hours. Dr. Fred holds 3 National Age Records. By 2011, Dr. Fred had run a total of 244,950 miles.

Dr. Fred’s writing career arose from his medical practice and running competition. A tenacious advocate of clarity and precision in medical discourse both in his teaching and as an author, Dr. Fred determined to improve the accuracy of medical communication, written and spoken. Dr. Fred wrote over 450 scholarly medical articles. He served as editor-in-chief of the Houston Medical Journal from 1984 to 1988 and Houston Medicine from 1988 to1993. Other editorial responsibilities included positions with Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise from 1979 to 1986, Annals of Sports Medicine from 1982 to 1985, Circulation from 1995 to 2004, Resident and Staff Physician from 2003 to 2008, and Texas Heart Institute Journal from 2011to the present. Dr. Fred served as a peer reviewer for Southern Medical Journal, Chest, Journal of the American Medical Association, and Circulation. He was a correspondent for Ultrarunning magazine from 1981 to 1986. Dr. Fred authored several books in his career, including "Elephant Medicine and More", "Say Aah, Medical Writing: A Practical Guide", "Looking Back (and Forth): Reflections Of An Old-Fashioned Doctor", "Images of Memorable Cases: 50 Years At The Bedside", and "The Best of Herb Fred, MD".

Dr. Fred served on the Board of Trustees for the Houston Congregation for Reform Judaism from 1995 to 2004, acting as President of the Board from 1996 to 1998. Additionally, he joined the Board of Directors for the Friends of the Texas Medical Center Library in 2007, acting as Secretary from January 2011 to the present.

Dr. Fred continued to practice medicine and ran 11 miles a day on his treadmill until 2016. He retired in 2016. Dr. Fred died on December 30, 2018 and is buried in Agudath Jacob Cemetery in Waco.

Greer, Alvis

  • Person
  • 1885-1975

Alvis Eugene Greer was born May 6, 1885, in Gallatin, Illinois. He earned his MD from Northwestern University in 1908 and received an Alpha Omega Alpha key at graduation. He spent two years at Harvard Postgraduate Medical School and served in the Army Medical Corps in World War I. Geer specialized in internal medicine and diseases of the chest. Taught at Baylor College of Medicine and was on staff at the Houston Tuberculosis Hospital, Memorial Hospital, and Jefferson Davis Hospital. He was a member of the American College of Chest Physicians, serving on its board of examiners from 1946 to 1952 and president from 1953 to 1954. He died in Houston on August 8, 1975, and is buried at Forest Park Cemetery.

Ivan F. Duff, MD

  • Person
  • 1915-1994

Dr. Ivan Frances Duff was born July 20, 1915 in Pendleton, Oregon. He died in October 1994. He graduated from the University of Oregon and the University of Michigan Medical School, where he completed his internship and residency training in internal medicine. In 1946 he joined the faculty of the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Michigan, as an instructor, becoming a Professor in 1960. Dr. Duff founded the Turner Geriatric Clinic at the University of Michigan Medical Center. His major interest was in the field of rheumatic diseases.

Dr. Duff was a member of U.S. Naval Reserve and served on active duty as a commander in the Submarine Medical Service in the Pacific theater from 1942 to 1946. After the war, he returned to the University of Michigan where he joined the faculty of the Department of Internal Medicine.

Dr. Duff's interest in epidemiology led to studies with the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) beginning in 1964. He was a researcher with the ABCC from 1967-1975 and then with the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) from 1975-1986. He studied the incidence and prevelance of rheumatoid arthritis and gout in Hiroshima and Nagasaki patients.

In 1980, Dr. Duff was a member of an American Physician Exchange Group of twelve doctors visiting the People's Republic of China at the invitation of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences. This initial visit led to a long relationship between Dr. Duff and the Chinese medical community. From 1981 to 1991, Dr. Duff was a research consultant at Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences Beijing, People's Republic of China, where he collaborated in epidemiologic studies of rheumatic diseases.

Dr. Duff was a leader in the field of rheumatology. He was the recipient of many awards and honors and served on many national panels.

Dr. Duff died at his home in Ann Arbor, Michigan on Oct. 27, 1994 at the age of 79.

Kelsey, John

  • Person
  • 1922-2010

John Roger Kelsey was born in May 1922 in Deport, Texas. He graduated from Baylor College of Medicine and later became a fellow in internal medicine and gastroenterology at Mayo Clinic. While in Minnesota, he earned his Master of Science degree from the University of Minnesota. He served as clinical professor of medicine at Baylor College of Medicine and as chief of the gastroenterology department at Methodist Hospital. Dr. Kelsey, along with Dr. William Seybold and Dr. William Kelsey developed Houston’s Kelsey-Seybold Clinics.
Citation: CHRONICLE, CINDY HORSWELL HOUSTON. "John Kelsey, Founder of Clinic Bearing His Name, Dies." Houston Chronicle. N.p., 24 July 2010. Web.

Kelsey, Mavis P.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n80061247
  • Person
  • 1912-2013

Dr. Mavis Parrott Kelsey, founder and senior partner of the Kelsey-Seybold Clinic, P.A., was born in Deport, Texas on October 7, 1912. In 1932 he received his Bachelor of Science degree from Texas A&M College. Inspired by his grandfather, country doctor Dr. Joseph Benson Kelsey, he attended the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, earning his MD in 1936. Dr. Kelsey served a rotating internship at New York City's Bellevue Hospital before returning to UTMB for a year as an Instructor in Pathology. From 1938 to 1939 he served on the Junior staff of Scott and White Clinic in Temple, Texas. On September 17, 1939, Dr. Mavis P. Kelsey married Mary Randolph Wilson. In that same year he accepted a three-year fellowship in internal medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, where he befriended Dr. William Dempesey Seybold, whom he had first met at UTMB. Dr. Kelsey's stint at the Mayo Clinic was interrupted by his service in the U.S. Army Air Force, Medical Corps from 1941-1945. His assignments a included Certified Flight Surgeon's rating; Surgeon of the 11th Fighter Command in Alaska, 1942-1943; Editor-in-Chief of the Air Surgeon's Bulletin. Dr. Kelsey attained the rank of Lieutenant Colonel and was awarded the Legion of Merit in 1945. For awhile during the war, the Kelseys were stationed in Dayton, Ohio, where Dr. Kelsey worked at the Aero Medical Research Laboratory, Wright Field Air Force Base.

After the War, Dr. Kelsey completed his training at the Mayo Clinic receiving a Masters of Science in Internal Medicine from the University of Minnesota, Mayo Foundation, in 1947. He was appointed to the Mayo Clinic staff as an Instructor in Medicine. After some deliberation, the Kelseys returned to Houston on January 15, 1949. Dr. Kelsey leased office space in the new Hermann Professional building with the intent to practice internal medicine with an emphasis on endocrinology. Unfortunately, construction was running behind and the office was not ready, so Dr. E.W. Bertner and Dr. George Waldron each offered free office space. Dr. Kelsey divided his time between the two offices until May. In 1950 Dr. Kelsey encouraged Drs. Leary and Seybold to reconsider the prospect of establishing a clinic in Houston, and idea they had discussed while working together at the Mayo Clinic, Leary in chest diseases and Seybold in surgery. Seybold moved to Houston in October of 1950 and Leary in January of 1951 and the three physicians founded the Kelsey-Leary-Seybold Clinic. The Clinic first resided on the fourteenth and eighth floors of the Hermann Professional Building.

In addition to his clinic practice, Dr. Kelsey held many teaching and administrative posts. Among them were: Instructor of Medicine, Mayo Foundation in the University of Minnesota; Acting Dean, the University of Texas Postgraduate School of Medicine; Clinical Professor of Medicine, University of Texas School of Biomedical Sciences; Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine. Dr. Kelsey also served on the staff of St. Luke's Hospital (Consulting Staff and Vice Chief of Staff), Methodist Hospital and M.D. Anderson Hospital for Cancer Research. Dr. Kelsey also acted as Medical Advisor for many corporations including the Pennzoil Corporation, Roy M. Huffington, Inc. and United Energy Resources. Over the years Dr. Kelsey has been an active member in many professional associations and organizations. They include: Alpha Omega Alpha, Alpha Kappa Kappa, Sigma Xi, he was elected to the Philosophical Society of Texas, Fellowship in the American College of Physicians, Aerospace Medical Association, American Thyroid Association, Harris County Medical Association, Texas Medical Association, The Endocrine Society, American Medical Association, Mayo Alumni Association, American and Texas Diabetes & Endocrine Association, American Cancer Society (Board of Directors, Harris County Unit), Yearbook of Cancer (Editorial Consultant), Kelsey-Seybold Foundation member of the Board of Trustees and Grants Committee, Member of the President's Council for Texas A&M Medical College and the Sterling C. Evans Library, First City National BankMedical Center (Board of Directors), Development Board of University of Texas Medical School-Galveston. Dr. Kelsey's participation in civic and social organizations reflect his interest in the fine arts, history and genealogy and nature. He has devoted time and resources to the Houston Country Club, A&M Association of Former Students, Friends of the A&M University Library, University of Texas Health Science Center-Presidents Club, Allegro, UT Alumni Association, Texas Nurseryman's Association, Texas Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, ASIA Society, Friends of Bayou Bend, American Book Collector's Society, Beaumont Art Museum, Harris County Heritage Society, Southwestern Cattleman's Association, and the Houston Committee on Foreign Relations, a charter member of the American Historical Print Society. Dr. Kelsey is a Distinguished Alumnus of Texas A & M and an Ashbel Smith Distinguished Alumnus of the U.T. Medical School in Galveston.

Dr. Kelsey and his wife, Mary had a great love for American art and Americana. They donated their collections to several museums and university libraries. The Mavis and Mary Kelsey Collection of Winslow Homer Prints is housed in the Museum of Fine Arts Houston. Dr. Kelsey wrote the catalog for this Collection, named "Wilson Homer Graphics", which is an authoritative reference work used by Homer scholars nationwide. The United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland received their collection of Naval Prints. The Kelsey Collection of Thomas Nast Illustrations was donated to Pepperdine University. The University of Houston was given a collection of wood engravings on Social Life and War. The Kelseys’ collection of the letters of John Quincy Adams was given to Bryan Mawr College. Dr. and Mrs. Kelsey gave to the Sterling C.-Evans Library of Texas A&M University their Collection of Americana. Several thousand books, art works and prints make up this outstanding collection. He and his wife traveled extensively and studied their respective family histories. They wrote six books of genealogy.

Dr. Kelsey was an active farmer and rancher for many years and participated in a number of other business activities including oil exploration and apartment building. After his retirement he Mary devoted their time in writing genealogy; cataloging and writing about their extensive collection of historical and art prints, painting and rare books, investing and philanthropy. In 1985, Dr. Kelsey retired from the Kelsey-Seybold Clinic after thirty-seven years. He died November 12, 2103.

Ledbetter, Paul V.

  • Person
  • 1899-1983

Paul V. Ledbetter, MD, established the Ledbetter clinic in Houston in 1925. He died January 21, 1983. He had the first electrocardiographic (EKG) machine in the Houston area. Dr. Ledbetter was born in Sweet Home, Texas in 1899. He received his medical degree from the University of Texas Medical School in 1921. He helped to establish the Houston Society of Internal Medicine in 1945 and the Houston Heart Association in 1948. He was the first physician president. He also was instrumental in forming the St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital Board. He was a fellow of the American College of Physicians and was on the faculty at the Texas University Dental School.

Merrill, Joseph

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n77015012
  • Person
  • 1923-

Joseph Melton Merrill was born December 8, 1923 in Andalusia, Alabama. He attended the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa for 15 months before qualifying for medical school. He enlisted in the infantry reserves in 1942 and because special consideration was given to medical students, was sent back to Tuscaloosa to start medical school in September 1944. He was in the Air Force in the early 1950s. As of February 2021, no obituary or other indication of his death have been found.

Murad, Ferid

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/no96063323
  • Person
  • 1936-

Ferid Murad was born in Indiana in 1936. He graduated from DePauw University in Greencastle, Indiana in 1958 and went on to complete an MD-PhD program at Western Reserve University in Cleveland and attended Massachusetts General Hospital for his internship and residency. Later, he went on to work with the NIH as a clinical associate in the Heart Institute as well as with the University of Virginia, Stanford, Abbott Laboratories, and the Molecular Geriatrics Corporation. He came to Houston in 1997 to work with the University of Texas.

[Source: “Ferid Murad – Biographical.” Nobelprize.org. Les Prix Nobel, 1998. Web.]

Renfert, Henry

  • Person
  • 1920-2003

Dr. Henry Renfert, Jr. was born May 5, 1920 in Fort Worth, Texas, to German immigrant Heinrich Renfert and his wife, Wisconsin native Wanda Stresau. He had an older brother and sister, Frederic and Wandy, and a twin sister, Melita. His childhood was spent mostly in Galveston but his parents sent him to Wisconsin to attend high school at the Milwaukee Country Day School (1934-1937). He graduated from Cornell University in 1941. He earned his M.D. from Cornell University Medical College in 1944 and interned at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.

He served as medical officer in 1944-1945 aboard the U.S.S Hydrus and U.S.S. Independence; during this time, the Independence was assigned to atomic bomb experiments on Bikini Atoll. He completed his residency training in internal medicine at the University of Michigan before returning to the Navy to serve as Senior Medical Officer at the U.S. Navy Infirmary in Sasabo, Japan. He was awarded both a Naval commendation medal for the success of his program to control communicable diseases at the Sasabo base, and a Navy Reserve medal for ten years of service to the Navy.

Upon returning the United States, he spent a year as an assistant professor at Ann Arbor and then returned to his home state to go into private practice in Austin. He was joined by Dr. Virgil Lawless in 1956 and went on to found the Austin Diagnostic Clinic; their dream was to build a smaller form of the Mayo Clinic in Central Texas. In 1958, Dr. Renfert returned to Cornell as Associate Dean and Assistant Professor of Medicine, staying two years before returning to Austin to rejoin the Austin Diagnostic Clinic. The Austin Diagnostic Clinic was the first clinic in Austin to provide in-house radiology and laboratory testing, as well as the first to supply its own specialists in many different fields. It eventually grew into the Austin Diagnostic Medical Center, with a hospital and over 130 doctors. Today, it is called the Austin Medical Center and has several branches.

Dr. Renfert died in Austin on January 5, 2003. He was cremated and his ashes scattered in Hitchcock, north of Galveston.

Dr. Renfert was also an avid collector of railroad china and donated his collection, thought to be the largest in the United States, to the Gulf Coast Railroad Museum in Galveston in 1991.

Rodgers, L. Rodney

  • Person
  • 1920-2012

Lawrence Rodney Rogers, MD, was born March 9, 1920 in Clovis, New Mexico, to a cowboy and a schoolteacher, and died December 13, 2012, in Houston. He grew up in Amarillo, Texas. He was elected to the Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor Society during his junior year at the University of Texas Medical Branch. He volunteered for the US Army during World War II and served as a battalion surgeon in the 42nd Rainbow Division in the European Theater, including the Battle of the Bulge, for which he earned three Bronze Stars and four Battle Stars. Accounts of his treatment of prisoners at Dachau and Jewish patients in occupied Austria are on video at the Houston Holocaust Museum.
Dr. Rodgers specialized in internal medicine at Philadelphia General Hospital for three years before returning to Texas to practice in Houston from 1949 to 1994. He was chair of the Department of Internal Medicine at Hermann Hospital in 1965 and was active in the effort to establish the University of Texas Medical School at Hermann in 1966-1967 and served the school both as a professor and member of many committees.
Dr. Rodgers served the Harris County Medical Society as TMA delegate, on the executive board, and for a year as vice president, and was for a time editor of the Harris County Physician. He served as President of the Houston Society of Internal Medicine in 1974, of the Houston Academy of Medicine in 1981, of the Doctors’ Club in 1986, and the Houston Philosophical Society in 1994, and supported and participated in many more organizations. He was awarded the Ashbel Smith Distinguished Alumni Award by UTMB, and the American College of Physicians awarded him both a Laureate Internist Award for Texas and Mastership of the College.

Wolf, Edward Trowbridge

  • Person
  • 1900-1987

Edward Trowbridge Wolf, MD was born May 2, 1900 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He received his Bachelor of Science in Pre—Med from Pennsylvania State College and in 1948 was honored with a 25 year Service Award from the Phi Delta Epsilon Medical Fraternity there. He was a June 1933 graduate of Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia, PA. Dr. Wolf served his internship at the Frankford Hospital in Philadelphia from 1933 to 1934 and at the William Beaumont General Hospital while in the US Army. Upon coming to Houston, he established his 46-year Internal Medicine practice at 4411 Fannin.

During WWII, Dr. Wolf was called up for active duty by the US. Army during which time he served at the rank of Major (MAJ), beginning January 1941, until his promotion to Lieutenant Colonel (LTC) in February 1943. In addition to stateside assignments, he was a veteran of two years of service with the medical corps in Australia and in the jungles of New Guinea. Following his service in Australia, he returned to inactive military status separating from the service in August 1945 to resume his Houston practice. LTC Wolf received an Honorable Discharge from the Army in May of 1951.

Dr. Wolf was appointed to the Baylor University College of Medicine Clinical Faculty as Assistant/Associate Professor of Medicine in Sept. 1943 and continuously held the position through June 1975. While a member of the medical staff at the Methodist Hospital in Houston, Dr. Wolf served as the Chairman of the Metabolic, Endocrine, Joint Disease Medical Care Appraisal Committee and Chairman of the Publications Committee. He was the first editor of News Notes published for the Methodist Hospital medical staff, a post he held for 5 years. Dr. Wolf was chairman of the first Blood Bank Committee of the Harris County Medical Society, and is perhaps most widely known as editor, for 10 years, of the Medical Record and Annals.

As a 45-year member of the Harris County Medical Society he served on the Press Committee. Dr. Wolf was Historian of Houston Society of Internal Medicine and in 1951, President of the Postgraduate Medical Assembly of South Texas. He was a member of the Texas Medical Association for 50 years, serving in 1968, as Chairman of the Technical Exhibits Sub-Committee. An Associate of the American College of Physicians, Dr. Wolf also held memberships in the American Medical Association, American Society of Internal Medicine and the NIH Alumni Association. He served as Consulting Internist for the Texas State Highway Patrol, the Southern Pacific Railroad (1961-1965), and was Consulting Internist and a member of the Board of both Planned Parenthood and the Visiting Nurses Association.

In addition to his professional service, Dr. Wolf contributed to many local organizations including the Deptartment of Medicine Library Fund of the Baylor College of Medicine, the Dept. of Medicine Library Fund of the Methodist Hospital, the Ellard Yow Memorial Library at Methodist Hospital, and The Foundation for the Museum of Medical Science. Edward Trowbridge Wolf, MD passed away July 15 1987.