Medical centers

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Medical centers

11 Archival description results for Medical centers

11 results directly related Exclude narrower terms

Interview with Dr. Richard T. Eastwood

Interview with Dr. Richard T. Eastwood by Don Macon. An MDA-TV Production, Medical Communication. Produced for the University of Texas - Texas Medical Cent Historical Resources Project. Video Recorded 8/28/75. MDAH Master # 365-1-75. Runtime is 31:28 minutes.
(0:18) Don Macon introduces the program and Richard T. Eastwood, Executive Vice President and Director of Texas Medical Center, Inc.
(0:50) Eastwood offers some details of his biography, beginning on a farm in Nebraska.
(2:53) Eastwood describes his time working on the farm, including shucking corn. He cites his decision to go to college.
(6:20) Eastwood cites his attendance at Tarkio College in Missouri, where he finished 1936. He reports considering a law career, teaching high school business and history courses, and in 1938 deciding to go back to school. He recounts helping build tennis courts in the summer of 1934.
(8:52) He speaks of the University of Nebraska, where he got his master’s degree in 1939. He recounts further education and work at the University of Wisconsin and University of Alabama.
(11:38) He describes his activities during World War II, including a commission and brief time at Harvard.
(12:07) Eastwood speaks about meeting his wife, Elizabeth Comer [sp?], whom he married in 1942.
(12:45) Returning to the topic of the war, he describes a move to New Orleans, where he was in charge of a training program at Fleet Operational Training Command. He then applied for sea duty and went to the Pacific, including the Okinawa campaign.
(13:58) Eastwood describes the end of the war and his return to Alabama and Wisconsin. He speaks in more detail about his role at Alabama and the evolution of programs at Birmingham and the Medical Center.
(17:55) He begins discussing how he came to Houston. He was to visit TIRR and meet with Dr. William Spencer, and then attend the Alabama-Houston football game.
(18:45) Eastwood mentions how his name came up for the TMC position. Macon and Eastwood speak about Dr. Frederick Elliott, who was retiring in 1962. Eastwood speaks in more detail about his decision to take the TMC job.
(23:09) Macon talks about the TMC and the responsibilities of the job. Eastwood discusses projects underway and his vision for more centralized resources such as a computer facility.
(26:03) Eastwood discusses highlights of his tenure. He mentions specific instances of cooperation and centralization, such as the childcare facility, laundry, computer facility, residence halls, heating and cooling facility, library expansion, and changes to parking and traffic.
(29:51) Macon concludes the interview by thanking Eastwood for his efforts.

Eastwood, Richard T.

“The Texas Medical Center”, Methodist Hospital, Raymond O’Leary, production by TMC, Inc, color

This film contains a program titled “The Texas Medical Center” from approximately 1972. It begins with an overview of the TMC and its history. The bulk of the program is dedicated to a video tour of the TMC, offering brief characterizations of many of its hospitals and educational institutions.

The credits read: “The Texas Medical Center. This film was made possible through the cooperation of the administrators and staff of all institutions in the Texas Medical Center. Production coordinated by Texas Medical Center, Inc. with the full support and cooperation of the Council of Directors and Administrators. These people made special contributions of their technical skills: Manfred Gygli, William R. Pittman, Gloria J. Heard, Herbert R. Smith, Mario Paoloski, Ken Wiedower, Joachim Zwer. Narrated by Don Macon. Produced and Directed by Raymond O’Leary.”

The U-matic tape AVV-IC002-005 is a transfer/duplicate of this program.

Texas Medical Center

The Texas Medical Center. Narrated by Don Macon, Produced/Directed by Raymond O’Leary, U-matic (3/4”)

This ¾” U-Matic tape contains a program titled “The Texas Medical Center” from approximately 1972. It begins with an overview of the TMC and its history. The bulk of the program is dedicated to a video tour of the TMC, offering brief characterizations of many of its hospitals and educational institutions.
The credits read: “The Texas Medical Center. This film was made possible through the cooperation of the administrators and staff of all institutions in the Texas Medical Center. Production coordinated by Texas Medical Center, Inc. with the full support and cooperation of the Council of Directors and Administrators. These people made special contributions of their technical skills: Manfred Gygli, William R. Pittman, Gloria J. Heard, Herbert R. Smith, Mario Paoloski, Ken Wiedower, Joachim Zwer. Narrated by Don Macon. Produced and Directed by Raymond O’Leary.” The video runs 29:24.
(0:01) The introduction to this program frames the Texas Medical Center as a city, explaining the variety of facilities and services there. The visuals include a mixture of images of buildings and people.
(1:18) The video tells of the origins of the TMC, going back to the trustees of the M. D. Anderson Foundation in 1941. The narrator recounts the acquisition of a 134-acre tract of land from the City of Houston. He introduces the Texas Medical Center, Inc., which he says is responsible for development and coordination across the TMC. He names the TMC leaders Dr. E. W. Bertner, Dr. Frederick Elliott, and Dr. Richard T. Eastwood. He relates that that TMC was designed to attract institutions dedicated to health ed, research, patient care and service.
(3:07) The program offers an overview of the buildings and institutions of the TMC. Hermann Hospital and its Nurses Residence predate the TMC, having been established in 1925. Baylor College of Medicine began construction in 1946. Soon came the Methodist Hospital, Shriner’s Hospital for Crippled Children, the Houston Academy of Medicine’s Jones Library Building, Texas Children’s Hospital, St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital, The University of Texas in Houston’s M. D. Anderson Cancer Hospital and Tumor Institute, and the University of Texas Dental Branch. By 1963, new buildings included the Texas Institute for Rehabilitation and Research, the Houston Speech and Hearing Center, the Texas Research Institute for Mental Sciences, Texas Women’s University College of Nursing, the Institute of Religion and Human Development, and Ben Taub General Hospital. There were also expansions and new buildings for existing institutions.
(5:38) The program changes its focus to people in the TMC He narrators explains over 3,000 people receive care daily. In 1970, 105,000 people “lived” there, at least for a while. There were approximately 950,000 patient visits in 1970. He highlights the growth of specialized services. Approximately 15,000 people work in the TMC, and there are 3,700 volunteers.
(7:06) Ben Taub General Hospital. The video cuts to an ambulance followed by an Emergency Room scene at Ben Taub General Hospital, which is a 435-bed hospital in the Harris County Hospital District.
(8:11) City of Houston Department of Public Health. The program presents the City of Houston Department of Public Health, which offers environmental and special health services for the prevention, early detection, and treatment of disease.
(8:43) Hermann Hospital. The program notes Hermann Hospital’s community contributions. The narrator describes the modernized hospital and its affiliation with the University of Texas as a teaching hospital.
(9:15) Methodist Hospital. The program highlights Methodist’s worldwide reputation. The narrator cites its high goals in medical education, research, patient care, and advanced techniques. He mentions its strengths in internal medicine, cardiovascular surgery, neurological surgery, orthopedic surgery, and organ transplantation.
(9:53) St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital. Cutting to a video of a birth and then showing the premature nursery, the program features St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital. The narrator mentions other specialized facilities, such as coronary and intensive care units, a heart catheterization laboratory, a urodynamics lab, and a heart transplant unit.
(10:45) Texas Children’s Hospital. The program describes the 174-bed pediatric hospital connected to St. Luke’s and touts it hematology research laboratory.
(11:03) Texas Heart Institute. Showing a video of heart surgery, the program discusses the Texas Heart Institute.
(11:20) Shriner’s Hospital for Crippled Children. The program shows scenes of rehabilitation, including in a pool, at Shriner’s Hospital for Crippled Children.
(11:58) Houston Speech and Hearing Center. The program describes Houston Speech and Hearing Center’s programs testing, training, and treating patients, as well as teaching professionals. The narrator highlights its New Institute for Research in Human Communication and its Disorders.
(12:35) Texas Institute for Rehabilitation and Research. The program tells of the comprehensive rehabilitation care provided by the Texas Institute for Rehabilitation and Research. The narrator tells of the medical, psychological, and social care and support there.
(13:16) Texas Research Institute Mental Sciences. The program describes the Texas Research Institute for Mental Sciences’ research to solve “the problems of the mind.” It tells of research into drug abuse and the development of therapies to alleviate pain and suffering.
(14:02) M. D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute. The program features the M. D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute. It highlights the germ-free environments of Life Island and the Laminar air flow room.
(14:47) UT System in Houston health sciences education. The narrator notes the M. A. Anderson Hospital offers clinical residency programs, as well as pre- and post-doctoral fellowships in basic sciences.
(15:13) University of Texas in Houston School of Public Health. The program reports that the new School of Public Health mixes research plus community outreach.
(15:46) University of Texas Dental Branch. The program emphasizes the University of Texas Dental Branch’s new teaching methods, including the use of television. The narrator highlights laboratories and a 400-seat auditorium. The Postgraduate School of Dentistry offers continuing professional education. The School also offers graduate programs and advanced courses in cooperation with the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences. The Dental Science Institute is its research arm.
(16:50) The narrator notes the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences offers life sciences courses to engineers, scientist, technicians, doctors, and nurses. The Division of Continuing Education allows practicing physicians to obtain new medical knowledge through courses with specialists.
(17:14) University of Texas Medical School. The program introduces the University of Texas’s new Medical School in Houston, noting Hermann Hospital’s status as a primary teaching unit. The video shows images of the proposed Medical School facility, not yet completed. The narrator reports it will have 800 students once it reaches capacity. The program highlights the medical community television system, designed for sharing learning resources, with cables connected across the 22 TMC institutions through the Jones Library.
(18:14) Baylor College of Medicine. The program notes that Baylor College of Medicine is one of the top medical schools in the country. It reports Baylor’s research activities range from elemental analysis of biological compounds to the development of artificial heart components. Baylor’s research areas include lipids, virology, epidemiology, cardiovascular disease, and more. Baylor’s affiliates and teaching hospitals include Methodist Hospital, Ben Taub General Hospital, St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital, Texas Children’s Hospital, the Veteran’s Administration Hospital, Texas Institute Rehabilitation and Research, Texas Research Institute for Mental Sciences.
(19:32) Texas Woman’s University College of Nursing. The narrator relates that TWU offers both BS and MS degrees. He adds the Schools of Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy have undergraduate and master’s programs. The program highlights the new facilities, with an enrollment planned to grow to 500.
(20:26) Institute of Religion and Human Development. The program reports that Institute of Religion and Human Development carries out graduate education and research in ministerial service, marriage and family counseling, and post-doctoral interdisciplinary ethical studies. It adds, the Institute’s education and training balance theology and science. The program shows images of the dedication of Rothko chapel, including views of the Broken Obelisk, reflecting pool and Chapel.
(21:21) Child Care Center. The narrator explains the Child Care Center opened in April 1968 and serves seven participating hospitals, accepting children aged three months to seven years, seven days a week.
(21:58) Harris County Medical Society. As library images are onscreen, the narrator says the Harris County Medical Society created the Houston Academy of Medicine to start a medical library in 1915. The HAM-TMC Library serves all TMC institutions plus the entire Houston academic and medical community, as well as Texas and the region. He adds the University of Texas Dental Branch and M. D. Anderson Hospital also have libraries. The Library participates in MEDLARS , which provides automatic storage and retrieval of information. The TMC Common Computer and Research Facility offers computer support for TMC scientists and academic community.
(23:29) The program reflects on the growth and changes of the TMC and looks to future. It highlights new planned facilities: the TMC Bertner Street Garage, the University of Texas Medical School, the University of Texas School of Public Health, the M. D. Anderson Outpatient Clinic and Lutheran Hospital, and the Hermann Hospital Emergency Room Facility. The narrator highlights the expansion of programs to train and educate, as well as the expansion and improvement of inpatient, outpatient, and ambulatory care facilities. He calls attention to the TMC’s ongoing emphasis on cancer, heart disease, organ transplantation, mental health, virology, pharmacology, lipid research, and rehabilitation.
(26:33) The program highlights applied research in improving the delivery of health care. In doing so it points out Baylor College of Medicine and its Institute for Health Services Research, the Xerox Center, and its Community Medicine Department.
(27:01) The program describes a future focus on increasing the accessibility of high-standard health services. The narrator touts a goal of closer relationships with other hospitals and community clinics, as the program shows images of Center Pavilion Hospital, Riverside General Hospital, the St. Anthony Center, and TIRR Priester Rehabilitation Unit. The discussion moves to the prevention of sickness and injury by preserving a healthy environment and educate individuals. The narrator mentions the City of Houston Department of Public Health, University of Texas School of Public Health, and Harris County Hospital District.
(28:16) The program closes by touting the “Comprehensive medical complex which has established Goals of excellence in medical education, biomedical research, patient care and health services to the community of the nation."

Texas Medical Center

The Texas Medical Center: as featured on Television by Humble Oil & Refinery Co., DVD

Video transfer to DVD of "The Texas Medical Center" as featured on television by Humble Oil & Refining Co. Related to AVF.IC002.003.

While the runtime for this DVD is longer than the original film, the content ends at the same point (around 9:03), with nearly four minutes of an empty recording.

Humble Oil and Refining Company (Incorporated in Tex.)

Texas Medical Center "Visions" U-matic (3/4”)

This ¾” U-Matic tape contains a 1985 program about the Texas Medical Center. The cassette case is labeled "Visions," while the program concludes with the words, “Visions Fulfilled….” It was produced by UT-TV Houston, Executive Director N. Don Macon, Production Supervisor Greg West, Producer/Writer Carla Diebold, Photographer/Editor Daniel Blust, Copyright 1985 Texas Medical Center. The recording runs 8:12, although the content stops around the 7:31 mark.
(0:03) Introductory sequence featuring a montage of TMC images.
(0:28) Narration begins introducing the TMC.
(0:50) The program features historical images and recounts the genesis of the Texas Medical Center. The narrator tells of Monroe Anderson’s fortune and the vision of trustees John Freeman, Horace Wilkins, and William Bates for a Medical Center.
(1:23) Interview with John Freeman, who discusses the acquisitions of land, establishment of institutions, and granting of funds.
(1:38) Discussions of financial support from Houston and elsewhere.
(2:14) November 1, 1945 TMC chartered.
(2:38) Historical images give way to contemporary images as the narration continues. The video prominently features images of buildings, facilities, and technology.
(3:05) The TMC includes 33 institutions. There is a focus on technology and medical advances, highlighting areas like immunology and curing cancer.
(4:32) The program highlights heart surgeries, research, and new techniques.
(5:00) Showing images of children, patients, and technology, the program looks towards the future. The narrator highlights further advances, patient education, and technology and communication.
(6:13) The program concludes by returning the interview with John Freeman.

Texas Medical Center

Texas Medical Center “The Power of a Dream” VHS

This VHS tape contains a program about the Texas Medical Center called "The Power of a Dream." The credits read: “Texas Medical Center. An Organization of Non-Profit Healthcare Providers. Special thanks for the use of photographs and aerial footage: Houston Academy of Medicine Texas Medical Center Library and other Texas Medical Center Institutions; Houston Industries, Inc.; NASA/Johnson Space Center. Produced by Hill and Knowlton, Inc. Through the facilities of UT Television, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center.” The video runs 5:45.
(0:02) Introduction stressing “The Power of a Dream” behind the Texas Medical Center. The video begins with a few historical images of the TMC before cutting to contemporary ones. Patient care, training, and research are highlighted.
(0:56) The program tells of the conception of the Texas Medical Center in the 1940s. The narrator briefly tells the story of Monroe D. Anderson’s dedication of his fortune.
(1:14) The TMC is declared a “monument to those dreams.” A graphical map of the TMC appears on the screen. The speaker notes the TMC has more than 40 member institutions, all of which are not-for-profit, and dedicated to patient care, research, education, and community wellbeing.
(1:40) As the camera pans across the TMC, the speaker touts the 675-acre campus. The program highlights the neighborhoods, shopping, and museums nearby. The program also stresses the way TMC members work independently and together.
(2:36) Responsible for planning and cooperation, the TMC Corporation is identified as the “tie that binds.” The narrator lists off types of TMC institutions: thirteen hospitals, two specialty care facilities, two medical schools, four schools of nursing, a school of public health, a school of pharmacy, a dental school, and others. He also highlights the air ambulance service, heart surgeries and organ transplant, space science, bio-engineering, and bio-technology. The program touts $350 annually in funded research activities.
(3:50) Honing in on patient care, the video shows images of children, nurses, doctors, and caregivers.
(4:13) The video highlights the TMC’s role in dissemination of knowledge and creation of health video programming.
(4:40) The video outlines the economic impact and size of the TMC, noting more than 100,000 people pass through daily.
(5:09) The video concludes, “The Texas Medical Center. Never doubt the power of a dream.”

Texas Medical Center

Multiple news stories about TMC Steam Explosion, U-matic (3/4”)

This video recording contains clips from three different television news stories reporting on a steam explosion in the Texas Medical Center. The videos were recorded on a 3/4" U-matic tape, and the total runtime is just over four minutes.
(0:01) Segment 1 "Explosion," Newscenter 11, anchor Steve Smith. The segment begins with Smith speaking, accompanied by the headline "Explosion" and a graphic showing "Texas Medical Center Gate 7." He reports on a "leak and explosion in a Medical Center steam line." It took place at the intersection of Holcomb and Bertner around 6:30. The clip then cuts to Nancy Carney reporting from the scene. She stands by the TMC Gate 7 sign, which is covered in mud. The segment describes shockwaves, flying concrete and mud, two nurses injured, and ten cars damaged. Then there is an interview Henry Kroeger, TMC Heating & Cooling Cooperative, who describes what happened. Next is an interview with Herman Pressler, "President, Board of Directors, T.M.I." He goes over canceled surgeries including all surgery at St. Luke's/Texas Children's Hospital and all elective surgey at Hermann Hospital. The segment concludes with an image of a crew working in the hole left by the explosion.
(1:24) Segment 2 "Untitled," Unidentified broadcast with unidentified male anchor. He reports that the explosion at the corner of Bertner and Holcomb "caused quite a traffic jam, but little else." As images of the site and ongoing repairs play, he continues his narration. He describes a hole six feet wide and twenty feet deep and damaged cars. He reports that Brown and Root, Fisk Electric, and the Medical Center all have repair crews working.
(2:01) Segment 3 "Medical Center Explosion," Channel 13 Eyewitness News, anchor Dave Ward. Ward leads with the announcement that Medical Center facilities were having to "curtail" medical procedures due to an explosion that "crippled" seven buildings. The segment then cuts to images of construction/machinery and the narration switches to Elma Barrera. She describes a "severe" explosion at the corner of Holcomb and Bertner that "left a gaping hole, scattered "huge concrete blocks," knocked down traffic light poles and street signs, and damage nearby vehicles. She reports, "The explosion had been severe, but no one knew how or why it happened." In the background is the same Gate 7 sign visible in the Newscenter 11 segment. In an interview, R.H. Stuttz. discusses the disruption of steam to the hospitals and the ongoing investigation. There is footage of a man who appears to be Henry Kroeger, TMC Heating & Cooling Cooperative, who also appears in the Newscenter 11 segment, but Barrera continues narrating and his interview is not audible. She reports seven buildings were affected, with the worst impacts on St. Luke's and Texas Children’s, but also MD Anderson and Hermann Hospital. In an interview, P. R. Maddeaux, St. Luke's Hospital describes the impact on surgical schedules, noting "we can't sterilize without the steam." Barrera reports two people were injured, with one treated and released and the other, an unidentified woman, remaining in the hospital in good condition. The segment concludes with more views of construction machinery at work.