Physiology

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Physiology

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Physiology

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Physiology

7 Authority record results for Physiology

7 results directly related Exclude narrower terms

Bruch, Hilde

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n50055887.html
  • Person
  • 1904-1984

Hilde Bruch was born in Dulken, Germany on March 11, 1904; her family was Jewish. An uncle encouraged her to study medicine and she graduated from Albert Ludwig University with a doctorate in 1929. She took academic and research positions with the University of Kiel and then the University of Leipzig, but left academia for private pediatric practice in 1932 because of rising anti-Semitism. She had already begun a career in pediatric physiology before she left Germany in 1933 after Hitler came into power. She then spent a year in England, where she worked at the East End Maternity Hospital, which served a Jewish community in an impoverished part of London. She moved to the United States in 1934 and worked at the Babies’ Hospital at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in New York City. She obtained her American medical license in 1935 and, in 1937, began research on childhood obesity, the beginning of her career studying eating disorders. She became an American citizen in 1940.
From 1941 to 1943 Bruch studied psychiatry at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore before returning to New York to open her own psychiatric practice and teach at Columbia University. She took a position in psychiatry at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston in 1964 and remained in Houston for the rest of her life. She died on December 15, 1984.

Schultz, Stanley G.

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n79086970
  • Person
  • 1931-2014

Stanley Schultz was born in New York City in 1931. He earned his undergraduate degree from Columbia University in 1952 and then his MD from New York University College of Medicine. His postgraduate studies at Belleville Hospital and Harvard Medical School were interrupted by a stint in the Air Force medical corps. When his Harvard studies were completed, he spent nine years at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine before joining UT Health in 1979. He was known for is work on ion movement across membranes and his significant contributions to oral rehydration therapy. He died October 23, 2014.

Vallbona, Carlos

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n81102713
  • Person
  • 1927-2015

Carlos Vallbona-Calbo’ was born in Granollers, Barcelona, Spain, on July 29, 1927. His father was abducted by a revolutionary security patrol in 1937 and never returned. Vallbona earned a medical degree in Barcelona in 1950 and did post-graduate work in Paris. He and his wife arrived in the US in the 1953, during the polio epidemic.
Vallbona began his career in the US at the University of Louisville School of Medicine in Kentucky but moved to Houston in 1955 to work for Baylor College of Medicine and for the Southwestern Poliomyelitis Respiratory Center, now The Institute for Rehabilitation and Research (TIRR). He stayed at Baylor for over 50 years. He did extensive work on post-polio syndrome and the use of magnets to relieve pain. He also worked with the Harris County Hospital District (Harris Health) to assist underserved communities. Dr. Vallbona died August 5, 2015, in Houston.

Hoff, Hebbel

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n85809755
  • Person
  • 1907-1987

Hebbel Edward Hoff was born December 2, 1907, in Urbana, Illinois. His family moved to Washington state when he was a child and he was the valedictorian of the 1924 class of Bothell High School, Bothell, Washington. He studied medicine at the Universisty of Washington for four years before being awarded a Rhodes Scholarship to study at Oxford University in England. He completed his M.D. at Harvard University in 1936 and continued to do research in electrocardiology at Yale University. He won the Warren Scientific Treatise Prize in 1941 while working at Yale. He was chair of the McGill University (Toronto, Ontario, Canada) Physiology Department from 1943 to 1948, when he took a position with Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. He was dean of Baylor until his death on May 1, 1987.

Spencer, William

  • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n95803665
  • Person
  • 1922-2009

William Albert Spencer born on February 16, 1922 in Oklahoma City. He went to Georgetown University for his Bachelor’s degree and was first in his class in medical school at John Hopkins University. Beginning in 1951 Dr. Spencer would lead staff at Baylor College of Medicine to address the polio epidemic. This research paved the way for Baylor to become one of the most prominent rehabilitation facilities in the country. He would become founder of The Institute of Rehabilitation and Research, or TIRR, which opened its doors on May 30, 1959. Today the hospital is officially part of the Memorial Hermann Hospital system. Throughout his life Dr. Spencer would treat patients, often children and young adults, and conduct research regarding traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injuries. Dr. Spencer served twenty-eight years as TIRR’s president and became known as the “Father of Modern Rehabilitation”; hospitals around the globe modeled their rehabilitation programs after it (Wendler, 2009, p.16). The TIRR was a facility ahead of its time under Dr.Spencer’s leadership. After the development of personal computers, Dr.Spencer petitioned IBM to link the computers (now known as networking) at TIRR and Baylor College of Medicine.
In his nonmedical life, Dr. Spencer would tinker with a number of inventions or other projects. These engineering projects would lead him to develop the physiography, which ended up being an early version of its predecessor the EKG. Dr. Spencer was married twice, first to Helen Hart in 1945 and then to Jean Amspoker in 1984. Jean predeceased him in 2005. Dr. Spencer died on February 18, 2009.

Huggins, Russell A.

  • Person
  • 1910-2001

Russell Arno Huggins was born 1910 June 25 in Cleveland, Ohio. Huggins graduated from Aurora College in Illinois and earned his Ph.D. in biology from the Case School of Applied Science, now Case Western Reserve University, in the later 1930s. He taught at the University of South Dakota Medical School from 1943 to 1945 and the University of Georgia College of Medicine in Augusta from 1945 to 1947. He joined the Baylor College of Medicine faculty in the department of pharmacology in 1947, then moved to physiology in 1960 and pediatrics in 1980. He contributed to the development of the departments of physiology at the University of San Juan, Puerto Rico, and Mahidol University in Bangkok, Thailand. Dr. Huggins was noted for his work in cardiovascular physiology and pharmacology, which contributed to the development of techniques for heart catheterization. He was a founding staff member of the USDA-Baylor Children’s Nutritional Research Center.
Dr. Huggins was married to Professor Sara Elizabeth Huggins, the University of Houston’s first female chair of the biology department. He died August 1, 2001, in Ithaca, New York, and is buried in Memorial Oaks Cemetery in Houston.

Wigodsky, Herman

  • Person
  • 1915-2005

Herman S. Wigodsky was born in Sioux City, Iowa on June 12, 1915. His undergraduate education took place in South Dakota. In 1936 he received his Bachelor of Arts in the field of biology from Yankton College, Yankton, South Dakota. While at University of South Dakota, he was a laboratory instructor in the Department of Physiology and Pharmacology in the School of Medicine. The following year he received a Bachelor of Science degree in the field of medicine from the University of South Dakota, Vermillion South Dakota. From 1937 to 1941 he studied at Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, Illinois. During his years at Northwestern he served as a research associate in the Department of Physiology. In 1938 he received a Master of Science degree in the field of physiology. After two more years of study he graduated with a Bachelor of Medicine and a Doctorate in physiology. Finally in 1941 he graduated with a Doctor of Medicine degree. Dr. Wigodsky completed an internship at Evanston Hospital, Evanston, Illinois, 1940-1941. After his internship Dr. Wigodsky taught at Northwestern University as an Instructor in the Department of Physiology. 1940-1946.

Dr. Wigodsky's service with the United States Military began in 1939. He served in the U.S. Army and Air Force Reserves, in ranks First Lieutenant to Lieutenant Colonel from 1939-1971. His first assignment with the United States Air Force was as Chief of the Department of Physiology, USAF School of Aviation Medicine, Randolph Field, Texas. From the period, 1939 to 1947 Dr. Wigodsky accepted ten assignments from the United States Air Force.

Dr. Wigodsky became associated with the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) in 1947. He was the Professional Associate on the Committee on Atomic Casualties, National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council, Washington, D.C. His assignment with the ABCC concluded in 1950 but his interest in nuclear accidents and radiation research continued.

Dr. Wigodsky was affiliated with the University of Texas Health Science Center and Medical School at San Antonio, starting in 1955. His first appointment was from 1955-1961, as the Director of the University of Texas Post-Graduate School of Medicine, San Antonio, Texas. Dr. Wigodsky served as a consultant and later as an Associate Coordinator for the University's Regional Medical Program Planning Office, 1967- 1968, 1968-1970. For eight years, 1970-1978 he was a lecturer in the Department of Pathology. In 1978 he was promoted to Clinical Professor. He was very active as a physician, professor, consultant and administrator. He coauthored a chapter entitled "Humans as Research Subjects" for the book In Birth to Death: Biology, Science, and Bioethics editors T. Kushmer and D. Thomasma. His principal research interest is "Pathophysiology of atherosclerosis utilizing the baboon as an animal model for human cardiovascular disease risk factors."

Dr. Wigodsky married Jo Ann Pincus in 1946. They had three grown children - John, Dan and Ann. He died January 24, 2005.